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December 12, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-12

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
U I

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1951

SURVEY SHOWS:

Greeks' Bias Attitudes
Not Affected by Clauses

M

(Continued from Page 1)

tracting pledges, were definitely least ready to admit minority group
members, while fraternities at the bottom of the prestige heap were
most ready to admit.
However, during a year-and-a-half of intensive discussion of the
discrimination issue, a leveling took place, and the correlation be-
tween prestige and admission attitudes tended to disappear.
INTERESTS AND AMBITIONS also seemed to play a role in de-
termining one's attitudes. Students in business administration, pre-
laW, or architecture were more negative towards admission than engi-
neers or pre-med students, while those planning to enter the field of
education showed the most favorable attitude towards admission.
Another interesting correlation could be seen between what
the men expected to be earning in five years and their admis-
sion views. A steady decrease in willingness to admit minority
members could be observed as post-University income estimate
increased. However at the top bracket, those who anticipated an
income of $8,500 or over in half a decade, the trend veered the
other way.
The Research Center pointed out that any number of factors
of minor or major importance might have been omitted in the sur-
vey-but this is mainly due to the very diversity of factors in determ-
ining one's readiness to change the present admission policies or de-
sire to continue it.
(Next: The "feedback" session.)

-Daily--Jeff Pemberton
ON THE AIR-Bernie Kahn, '52, plays the piano while Bob Leo-
pold, '52, beats out the rhythm as the speech department's "Oper-
ation 4006" presents Kahn's original song "Dear One" on a musi-
cal variety show in the mock network operation.
* * * *

,.Campus
Calendar
Events Today
UNESCO-Students from Pakis-
tan, India, Ceylon and Israel will
discuss "How Western Education
Has Influenced the East" at a
UNESCO meeting at 7:30 p.m. in
the Union.
LECTURE-"Some M o d e r n
Plastics" will be the topic of a
lecture by Prof. Leigh C. Ander-
son, chairman of the chemistry
department, at 8 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheatre,
* * *
EXTENSION COURSE - The
Institute of Public Administration
and the Extension Service will
conduct the sixth annual Short
Course for Assessing Officers be-
ginning at 9:30 a.m. in the Union
and continuing through Friday.
* * *
SOCIOLOGY - P r o f. Wilbert
Moore of Princeton University will
lecture on "The Theory of Social
Organization" at 4:15 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
The lecture will be presented
under the auspices of the sociology
department.
Marcelline Hemingway Sanford,
noted theatre critic, lecturer and
author, will speak on "This Season
on Broadway" at the speech de-
partment assembly at 4 p.m. in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Events Tomorrow
DEBATE-An Israeli and an
Arab student wil debate the topic
of the "Impact of Israel on World
Affairs" at an International Rela-
tions Club meeting at 7:15 p.m.
in Rm. 3K of the Union.
Coming Events
POPS CONCERT-The Univer-
sity Concert Orchestra will give a
"pops" concert at, 2:30 p.m. Sun-
day in Alice Lloyd Hall.
GLEE CLUB-A special service
of seasonal music will be given by
the Glee Club at 11 a.m. Sunday
at the First Baptist Church.
G&S Organization
Will Meet today
Gilbert and Sullivan enthusiasts
will have a chance to sign up for
next semester's G & S Society pro-
duction at 7:15 p.m. today in the
League.

From Ann Arbor to
CHICAGO
Connections to all points
West and Northwest

*FARES'

ONE WAY
$550

ROUND TRIP
$990

LEAVE
MICHIGAN
UNION
3:30 p.m.

APPROX.
RUNNING
TIME
61/2 hrs.

Ride the
'HOLIDAY EXPRESS'
STUDENT SPECIAL BUSES
OPERATED NON-STOP
To Give You THE MOST Time at Home
Leave Michigan Union FRIDAY, Dec. 21

Fewer Car Permits Issued;
Streif Interprets Regulations

Network Atmosphere Marks
Speech Department Project

I

Fewer students are requesting
driving permits this year than in
the past, the Office of Student
'Arfars' has reported, and student
driving is thus becoming less of a
problem.
While the drop in enrollment
may be a factor in the decrease,
15 per cent fewer requests have
been received this year than last,
and student enrollment has gone
down less than 10 per cent. There-
fore, the decrease has been attri-
buted to the University's "tighten-
Ing up" policy on violators.
VARIOUS ASPECTS of the stu-
dent driving ban have recently
been clarified by Karl D. Streiff,
assistant to the Dean of Students.
Interpreting the regulation, he
said, "Gaining the use of a car is
banned, as well as the operation
of one.
"Consequently, it Is not per-
missible for a student to use or
ride in his own or his family's
car for social, personal or any
other reasons when the car is
driven by anyone who is not a
member of his immediate fam-
ily,' Streiff continued.
He pointed out that this inter-
pretation does not mean that st-
dents cannot ride in a car as a
passenger, although he emphasized
"they can't sit behind the wheel."
Streiff said that both men and
women students may ride as ass-
engers in a car as long as they are
in no way associated with the
ownership of the car .
Complete responsibility for the
proper use of a car, as specified
on the permit, is in the hands
of the permit holder. Therefore,
a student riding in a car which
i6 driven illegally by a permit
holder is not held responsible for
the violation, Streiff explained.
THE UNIVERSITY has been1
cracking down on violators of the
driving regulations, he empha-
sized, in order to accomplish bet-1
ter control. Warnings have provenE
ineffective in enforcing the regu-
lation.
Violators now receive fines
ranging from ten dollars, which
goes into the general Univ.ersity
fund, to discipline by the Judi-
ciary Councils. Expulsion is
rare but may be imposed if the
case warrants such action. To
date, this semester 145 violators
Generation Will
Analyze_'U' Film
An essay on the filming of
"Metamorphosis" will highlight
the winter issue of Generation
magazine on sale next Monday,
Written by William Hampton,
Grad., producer and director of the
film, the article will present a de-
tailed account of the movie, the
aim of its creators and the prob-
lems they faced.
Following their policy of pre-
senting students' work in a wide
range of arts, the editors have se-
lected two short stories, several
poems, a play and varied examples
of art work to round out the mag-
azine's contents.

have been fined generally for
failure to hold permits,
The Office of Student Affairs
has issued 1425 "exempt" permits
to students who are over 26 years
old and to teaching fellows. Even
though a student Ffalls into one
of these categories, he must regis-
ter with the office. About 1075
students have been granted per-
mission to drive for business rea-
sons, commuting purposes and
health handicaps.
These special permits have also
been granted to married students
under 26 years old and to students
driving in Ann Arbor who may
drive with the consent of their
famili'es. Occasionally, temporary
and miscellaneous permission to
drive is granted to students re-
quiring the use of an automobile
for other needs.
Streiff has requested that hold-
ers of permits who are in doubt
about the limitations imposed on
their driving check with the of-
fice. "When in doubt," he said,
"don't drive without checking."
Tour Planned
To Crabrook
Foreign and American students
will have an opportunity to tour
the Cranbrook schools and other
Institutions in Bloomfield Hills
Saturday, on an excursion spon-
sored by the International Center.
George C. Petrossian, assistant
director of the center, announced
that reservations may be made to-
day and tomorrow at the center.
A fee of $1.50 will be charged.
The bus to Cranbrook will leave
the International Center at 12:15
p.m. Saturday and will return late
in the afternoon.
Petrossian explained that the
trip would provide a chance for
the foreign students to see an
American private school as well as
the associated museums, but he
emphasized that American stu-
dents are invited to join the group
on the trip.

3

The fourth floor of Angell Hall
took on the atmosphere of a net-
work radio station yesterday as
the semi-annual speech depart-
ment "Operation 4006" swung in-
to action.
The "operation," in w h i c h
speech department radio students
present two full days of "network
broadcasting" condensed, will be
concluded tomorrow.
IN ORDER TO squeeze a full
broadcast schedule between 3:30
and 9:30 p.m., the programs,
which are aired throughout the
fourth floor of Angell Hall, are
reduced to one-third of their nor-
mal length. Thus, a 15 minute
soap opera lasts approximately five
minutes and a half-hour variety
show takes up slightly less than
10 minutes.
The shows include all the types
which can be heard on a large
network radio station on an'aver-
age weekday. Variety shows, news
programs, interviews, children's
shows and disc jockey features all
appear on the Operation 4006 pro-

gram log.
stems from1
the speech
studios.

The project's name
the room number of
department's radio

CLEVELAND $A40 $795
Connections for Buffalo, 3:30P.m- 5 hrs.
Erie, Boston, Rochester, Albany
Connections to R 3:30p.m. 31/2 hrs.
Muskegon, Traverse City
PITTSBURGH $ 95 $ 55
Connections to Washington, 3:30 p.m. 81/2 hrs,
Harrisburg, New York City
ST. IGNACE $I80 $185
Connections to all $8:10 p.m. 1012 hrs.
points in Upper Peninsula
plus 15 % Fed. Transp. Tax
LIMITED CAPACITY - RESERVATIONS NECESSARY
INFORMATION - TICKETS RESERVATIONS
Available at
THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

A

# I

Production is handled by
speech radio students with the
aid of their instructors. Writ-
ing, direction, sound, engineer-
ing, acting, announcing and of-
ficedwork are also student man-
aged.
The project was originated by
Prof. Garnet Garrison of the
speech department in 1948 as an
attempt to give students an op-
portunity to work under condi-
tions closely approaching a live
radio studio.
Anyone interested in hearing
the broadcasts may visit the lis-
tening room, 4203 Angell Hall, be-
tween 3:30 and 9:30 p.m. tomor-
row.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

A

Michigan Union U
Bus Desk
Phone: 2-4431 1
10:0A.M. to 8:00 P.M.1
Dec. 17-21st
GREYHOUND LINES

nion Bus Depot
16 West Huron
Phone 2-551 1

Michigan League
Building
Phone 2-3251

- - SHORT WAY LINES

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508 E. William

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LIFE
$4 a yea r to
LIFE
students &
LIFE
faculty members
makes an excellent Xmas gift
.. . Handsomely inscribed card
mailed to recipients. Phone or
write Student Periodical Agen-
cy, 330 Municipal Ct. Bldg.,
2-8242.

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