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December 11, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-11

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PAGE SIX

THE MT+ TGAI"s .g 1J I _ %L S'T

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1951

TH IHIA OUNLS

TUESDAY, DECEMBER U. 1951 A

Quartet's Finale

ENGINEERING ORATORS:
Debate Team Meels Toledo Tonight

LAST CONCERT--The Stanley Quartet will present its last performance of the year at 8:30 p.m.
today in Rackham Lecture Hall. The Quartet's members are (left to right): Prof. Gilbert Ross,
Prof. Emil Raab, Prof. Robert Courte, and Prof. Olver Edel, all of the music school. Today, the group
will also feature Prof. A. C. Case and Lare Wardrop on the piano and oboe respectively. The concert
is open to the general public.

U.S. Segregation Strongest
Red Weapon, Johnson Says

Communists are using the seg-
regation of Negroes in the South
as their most powerful weapon
againstrthe West, President Mor-
decal Wyatt Johnson, of Howard
University, said last Sunday.
Speaking at Hill Auditorium un-
der the sponsorship of the Student
Religious Association, Johnson,
also pointed out that ample ma-
terial for the Red propaganda
machine can be found in the eco-
Speech Group
To Broadcast
Angell Hall's entire fourth floor
will be converted into a commer-
cial radio station when the an-
nual Operation 4006 project be-
gins at 3:30 p.m. today.
Sponsored by Speech Depart-
ment Radio, Operation 4006 will
carry out a series of programs
simulating a day of broadcasting,
on a major network. The programs,
will originate from, and be piped
into the various studios and lis-
tening rooms on fourth floor An-
gell Hall.
This undertaking is unique inr
that all of the radio programs pre-
sented will consist only of contin-
uous four or nine minute shows.
Scripts for these shows have been
written in this manner so that all
radio students will have a chance
to broadcast.
Broadcasting times will be from
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., and 7:30
p.m. to 9:40 p.m. today and Thurs-
day.

nomic segregation which exists in
the nation's capital.
"NEGROES IN Washington," he
pointed out, "are limited to the
occupations of errand boys or
janitors and can fill no executive
positions."
T h i s situation constitutes
"proof" to the Communists, he
continued, t h a t the United
States will show a similar atti-
tude to the millions of Africans
and Asians.
The one-party system in which
10,000,00 Negroes are "substan-
tially disfranchised," and segrega-
tion in the schools and churches
were cited as further examples of
the existence of a "colonial sys-
tem" in the South.
"Democracy has never healthily
existed south of the Mason-Dixon
line, even in the most enlightened,
productive and capitalistic country
of the world," Johnson declared.
On the positive side of the pic-
ture, Dr. Johnson commended the
Supreme Court decision barring
the white primary in the South
and the work of the NAACP in
showing that these evils can be
eliminated by due process of law.
Last Play Tryouts
To Be Held Today
Tryouts for the Student Players'
second production, "Joan of Lor-
raine" by Maxwell Anderson, will
be held for the last time at 7:30
p.m. today.
The tryouts will be conducted
in the basement of the Zeta Psi
house, 1443 Washtenaw Ave., ac-
cording to Jim Brodhead, presi-
dent pro tempore.

Campus
Calendar
Events Today
LECTURE - George M. Foster,
director of the Institute of Social
Anthropology of the Smithsonian
Institute will speak on "Latin
America; an Anthropological In-
terpretation" under the auspices
of the anthropology department at
4:10 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
* * *
CONCERT-The Michigan Sing-
ers, directed by Prof. Maynard
Klein of the music school will give
a concert at 8:30 p.m. in Rackham
Memorial Auditorium in Detroit.
Coming Events
CONCERT-The Combined Uni-
versity Choirs and the University
Symphony Orchestra will present
a concert of Christmas music at
8:30 p.m., Thursday in Hill Audi-
torium.
CCNY Withdraws
Ban on Robeson
The Student-Faculty Committee
of the City College of New York
has withdrawn its absolute ban on
the appearance of Paul Robeson
as a speaker in their Great Hall.
The committee stipulated, how-
ever, that he should not appear
alone, but only as part of a panel
of speakers.
Previous speakers at The Great
Hall, all of whom spoke solo, have
been Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt,
Henry Wallace, Norman Thomas
and Newbold Morris.
The CCNY Student Council had
labeled the original ban "an
abridgement of academic free-
dom".

By MIKE SCHERER
Even when the football team
has a bad season, the University{
still has one team that comes out
on the winning end of intercolle-
giate competition.
The Sigma Rho Tau debating
squad, which has won a vast ma-
jority of its meets over a span of
22 years, will defend its record
Colrn oriuit
Tre 1id a6
Emphasizing the trend towards
conformity of ideas in this coun-
try, A. J. Muste, outstanding paci-
fist leader, challenged a UNESCO
group last night with the moral
problem of the social scientist.
Muste pointed out to his audi-
ence, which was composed mostly
of social scientists, the "terrific+
shock the nuclear physicists re-
ceived when they saw what the
government had done with the re-
sults of their atomic research."
A SOCIAL psychologist in the
audience objected to Muste's as-
sertion, claiming that the scien-
tists knew they were making ex-
plosive weapons for war,
Muste remained firm in his
initial thesis and went on to im-
press upon the social scientists
the need for deep concern with
the increasing reduction of free-
dom resulting from a "war psy-
chosis."
Prof. Kenneth Boulding of the
economics department agreed with
Muste as he underlined the danger
of state domination of science.
Taking a slap at the Communist,
negative attitude towards the ob-
jectivity of science, Prof. Boulding
stressed .the necessity for the ab-
solute loyalty to the truth in sci-
ence and warned the scientists
against their being used for ends
other than those which they desire.
Panel To Discuss
Social Structure
The Council of Arts. Sciences
and Professions will present a dis-
cussion on "Freedom and Social
Structure," at 8 p.m. today in the
Hussey Room of the League,
The panel, presided over by
Berkley Eddins, will include Dr.
Elizabeth Douvan, Lawrence K.
Northwood and John Floss.
Read Daily Classifieds .

against the University of Toledo man, Wilbur Bevan, '52E, Gordon
at an open meeting at 8 p.m. o- Brooks, '54E, Jim Evans, '55E, and
day in Rm. 3-G of the Union. Al Lang, '52E.
The conference method of de-
PROF. ROBERT D. BrackctjU of bating will be used because, ac-
the Engineering English depart- cording to Prof. Brackett, "It
ment, coach of the Engineeriny trains men for participation in
debaters, said that "records 0n.actual conferences of business
past performances of the Michi- life."
gan team are hazy, but they have He explained that there is little
won better than 75 per cent of practical value in the two man
their meets." type of formal debate, except for
The squa; on-ed its 1951 show purposes.
season last week with a unmai- The Michigan debating team is
nious decision over Detroit In- one of several speech activities of
stitute of Technoogy Sigma Rho Tau, the Stump
Tonight's topic, the one used Speakers' Society, w h i c h was
throughout "conference" compe- founded to give engineers oppor-
tition, will be "The Relocation of tunities in public speaking.
Northwest Aluminum Plants, Us- This year, in addition to eight
ing Large Amounts of Electrical Sigma Rho Tau "conference"
Power, Is in the Interests of Na- meets, the squad is looking for-
tional Welfare." The Michigan ward to a spring contest with wo-
squad will argue on the negative men from Michigan State Normal
side, although they take varying College in Ypsilanti. A traditional
sides of the question for different affair, the contest generallyt cen-
meets. ters on some humorous topic.
* * * "That is one time the women
THE UNIVERSITY team will don't get in the last word," Prof.
consist of Don Walker, '52E, chair- Brackett chuckled.

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