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December 09, 1951 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-09

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE ELEVEN

lH IHGNDIL AEEEE

Safety Council Tells

of Year's

Freak Accidents

r.

HUGO AND TREE
* *i * *
Hugo Procures Yule Tree;
Gives Views on Christmas

Since Chrismas was only
days away, Hugo Martinson, f
Daily neophyte, took axe in ha
and yesterday began to search t
arb for a "kind of big, may
about as tall as I am" Christn
tree.
Hugo is a long-haired Latvi
who had taken to haunting t
Daily city room until his famil
recent acquisition of a televisi
set gave him more importa
things to do.
THE BLOND eight year old w
found his barefoot way to i
Daily one day last summer slipp
on a pair of gymshoes (his cc
cession to winter weather) and i
gan his arb trek in hopes of fir
ing a tree to "fix up with I do
know what you call 'em. Thi
little things, like that," he e
plained pointing to the flash bi
in the photographer's camera.
"Christmas? Sure I kno
what it means," he declared em
phatically. "Christmas mean
when you get toys and sno,
comes down." About Jesus? '
don't know," he frowned. "May
be-maybe not."
"I think I got some eight do
lars," was his answer to a que
on his financial situation.
However Hugo still hasn't cap
tured the true spirit of the hol
day. He doesn't plan to use hi
hoard to purchase gifts for hi
family.
r lIC

He has, however, considered the
desirability of employing his funds
in the purchase of a small jeep
with pedals as a gift for his fa-
ther.
BY THIS TIME, having reached
the arb, he alighted from the car
and dragging an ~ae and a cap
gun in tow he bounded down a
hill and tapped a tall elm tree as
a likely prospect.
"This might be too big for my
house," he decided. After a long-
ing glance at several stately but
denuded maples he decided in
favor of a more traditional ever-
green and cap pistol in one hand
for use in case of an appearance
of campus cops, he proceeded to
make an attempt at felling the
tree.
"S'kinda tough eh?" he said
grinning. But the grin faded as
a dark car drove by. "Oh, oh,
maybe we has better go and come
back later," his voice said emanat-
ing from under a nearby bush.
Still feeling a bit guilty, but
somewhat recoveredhe continued
his stream of consciousness type
monologue on the trip home.
"NO, I HAS never seen Santa
Claus, 'cause always when I get
toys, my father doesn't dress like
Santa Claus."
In answer to the query, "do you
sing Christmas carols in Latvian or
English," his reply was, "Huh."

Do you ever have the feeling
that things in this good old U.S.A.
may just possibly be a little
wacky?
Well, take it from the National
Safety Council-you're right!
The Council has just completed
its annual roundup of odd acci-
dents, and dazedly reports some
mighty queer goings-on in the
field of freak squeaks.
A dog who's a hot rod driver .. .
a fish that caught a fisherman...
an airplane that crashed a red
traffic light ... a horse and wa-
gon that collided with a sailboat
a garden rake that shot the
raker-these and many other dizzy
doings indicate that things have
been slightly screwy in 1951.
THE POOCH who pined to drive
a hot rod was riding in a truck
with his master, William C. Hollis
of Denver. As Hollis drove through
Topeka, Kan., at a prudent pace
the dog stirred impatiently, reach-
ed over and planted a heavy paw
on the accelerator. The truck
leaped forward, went out of con-
trol, collided with a passenger car.
Four persons were injured. The
dog hasn't driven since.
Speaking of dogs, they say it's
news when a man bites one.
Then it must be hot stuff in-
deed when a fish catches a
fisherman. But it happened in
Edwardsburg, Mich. As David
Quinn, Jr., was ice fishing, he
suddenly let out a yelp. Hang-
ing on to his leg for dear life
was a four-pound pickerel. It'
took Quinn and two friends sev-
eral minutes to pry the fish
loose. It had leaped at Quinn
as he had hauled it up through
the ice.
Police in Miami, Fla., are used
to seeing all kinds of traffic on
busy U. S. Highway 1 during the
tourist season. But even they
were startled when Robert Sim-
mons, of Dayton, Ohio, landed his
airplane on the highway one Au-
gust afternoon, rolled through a
red traffic light and nudged a
truck before he stopped. Simmons
had been forced down by carbure-
tor trouble. Nobody was hurt. No
traffic ticket.
And all of us who have greet-
ed a new day by groaning, "I feel
like I've been run over by a
steam roller," can get a first-
hand report on the feeling from
eight - year - old Stanley Wil-
loughby, of Portland, Ore., who
actually underwent the experi-
ence. Fascinated by a three-ton
roller, Stanley grabbed on to a
pipe at its back and walked
along as it rolled. Suddenly the
roller backed up. It knocked
Stanley down, passed over his
legs and hip, and imbedded him
neatly into the hot, soft as-
phalt. He was injured only
slightly.
Haled into court when his auto
sideswiped another car, Joseph
Sylvester, 76, of Logansport, Ind.,

of New York City. Tommy fell 15
stories (120 feet) from a window
in his apartment, landed in some
shrubbery and escaped with a bro-
ken thigh and assorted cuts and
bumps.
And in Richmond, Ind., Stee-
plejack James Swootan went to
the hospital with injuries suf-
fered when he fell-not from a
steeple, but off a bar stool!
In Cincinnati, Clayton Busch's
car was struck by two trains tra-
veling in opposite directions. He
was left standing on the tracks,
steering wheel in hand, suffering
only from cuts and bruises compli-
cated by acute amazement.
* * * -
DRIVING ALONG a highway
near Fort Wayne, Ind., Mr. and
Mrs. James Gibson of that city
were having one of those sprightly
little chats husbands and wives
simetimes have about the hus-
band's driving habits. Mrs. Gibson
ended the discussion by throwing
the car keys out the car window.
Mr. Gibson slammed on the brakes,
and two cars following him piled

4

admitted he had been suffering
from a hangover. "But it was an
ice cream hangover, your honor,"
he told the judge. "I ate so much
that I cut loose with a big burp
and lost control of my car."
TO SKEPTICS who believe chiv-
alry is dead, here is a note of com-
fort: Cab Driver James Deeds, of
Des Moines, Ia., gave up his seat
for a lady-and did it the hard
way. Helping a fair passenger
unload a big sack of groceries
from his cab, Deeds backed into a
passing car, felt a draft, looked
up in time to see the seat of his
pants disappearing down the
street on the door handle of the
offending auto.

il

EVERY YEAR a few lucky peo-
ple survive fantastic falls. In 1951
the champion freak squeak faller
was two-year-old Tommy Paiva,

F

4*1A For Christmas
f TYPEWRITERS'
Corona ALL MAKES

up in a three-car collision. Gibson
was charged with reckless driving.
The driver of the second car was
charged with operating a car with-
out a license. His companion, own-
er of the car, was accused of per-
miting an unlicensed driver to op-
erate the car. The driver of the
third car was charged with im-
proper car registration. No charge
was placed against Mrs. Gibson,
who had merely thrown the keys
out the window.
In COLUMBUS, Ga., a safety
magazine saved the life of Jerrel
Lewis Byrd-but not in exactly the
way the editor had anticipated.
Byrd was shot in the chest in a
hunting accident, but the charge
Read Daily Classifieds

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at reasonable prices
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was diverted from his heart by a
tightly folded safety magazine
published by the Swift Manufac-
turing Co., where he works. He
escaped with slight flesh wounds.
Are you one of those auto
owners who think, "They don't
build 'em like they used to?" Try
to tell that to the Florida East
Coast Railroad! One of its
healthiest freight trains collid-
ed at West Palm Beach, Fla.,
with Ernest Benson's automo-
bile. The sturdy auto upset 18
loaded freight cars, tore up 1,000
feet of track, ruined 1,000 cross
ties, caused damage estimated at
$50,000. Benson was unhurt, but
unhappily reported that his auto
was banged up some.
Yes, it looks like good old 1951
was a little goofy in skots. But, as

th aigge, rntw l

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