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December 09, 1951 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-09

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

PAGE THREE

'SUPERFICIAL FREEDOM':
Italian Views Sex Relations

4

* *

4-

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the fifth
in a series of articles on how Ameri-
cans appear to foreign students. The
writer, a Fulbright scholar, was form-
erly on the editorial staff of Corrieri
di Napoli, a prominent Neapolitan
daily.)
By ALDO CANONICI
No concept is so confused abroad
as the one about the relationship
between men and women in the
United States.
What we know is that complete
freedom is the rule. You have
every opportunity to meet the op-
posite sex and if you are interest-
ed you very easily date them and
go on from there.
FIRST observances confirm the
above impression. The strange at-
mosphere at night in the girls dor-
mitories, the informality of women
and the ease with which you can
be introduced to them are encour-
aging factors in this sense; but it
is a big illusion. Many foreigners
are deceived by this false assump-
tion and need some time to recog-
nize its proper value, for we are
not accustomed to such apparent
freedom.
This is only on the surface.
Underneath we find a puritani-
cal background that from many
standpoints places America in a
circumstance of strictness worse
than that existing in many
Catholic countries. Relationships
Social Scientists
To Talk on Peace
"What are the Social Scientists
doing to Effect Peace?" will be
the subject of a UNESCO panel
at 7:30 p.m. today in Kellogg Au-
4 ditorium.
Prof. Kenneth E. Boulding of
the economics department, Prof.
Robert Angell, of the sociology de-
partment and A. J. Muste, Na-
tional Secretary of the Fellow-
ship of Reconciliation, will be the
speakers. Dave Leonard, Grad.,
will moderate.

COKE DATE-Mr. Canonici is
pleased with the informality of
American women-easy to date
and easy to satisfy.
* * *
between unmarried people have
to be particularly prudent in
order to avoid moral reaction.
This tendency is in sharp con-
trast with the superficial ap-
pearance.
The social contacts between
boys and girls are orientated in
this sense. In effect, the frequent
date has not the intimate mean-
ing we give to it in Europe. It
does not necessarily involve love
or the interest to become engaged,
but is a way for two persons to go
out and be together when they
enjoy each other's company. The
informality of women is a char-
acteristic which does not imply
sustained interest.
EVEN THE custom of boy and
girl friend is a "compromise" we
don't know at all. Abroad and es-
pecially in Latin nations I could
affirm that the men very rarely
have friends of the opposite sex.
They are interested in them only

for precise reasons and when they
have very clear purposes.
Here, on the contrary, the
boy or girl friends are a com-
promise between a personal feel-
ing of sexual affection and so-
cial necessity that is imposed
by the need "to get into the
.act." It is a matter of fact that
very little wish for intimacy is
found among these couples.
They prefer to be in groups and
don't try to isolate themselves.
Dances, parties, picnics, etc.
have to be seen more in terms of
social activities than of personal
desire to be with a specific per-
son.
' *' * *
IN CONTRAST with this liberty
is the special rule on the campus
-which is imposed on women to
be in their dormitories at a set
hour of the night. It is not rare
to observe coeds in a restaurant
or cafe compelled to leave in a
hurry because the hour approach-
es 10:30 p.m., while high-school
girls are able to remain with their
16 - or 17 year old boy friends as
long as they wish.
This contrast is sharp because
American women seem to be
rather mature and equipped to
defend themselves from every
kind of danger. This is in re-
gard to unmarried persons.
For others, one of the most as-
tonishing impression is the num-
ber of very young married couples.
Americans get married much
younger than Europeans in gen-
eral. Why? Many reasons can
be adducted. First of all are the
economic conditions which enable
a young man to find a job early
and in a position to build a family.
Also important is the possibility
that there is no social pressure
which prohibits the wives working
and so making a financial con-
tribution. We have furthermore
to consider the ease with which
divorce is obtained and finally the
above described puritanical feeling
in regard to unmarried persons
that encourages early marriage
thus avoiding moral condemna-
tions.
(NEXT: A view of American women.)J

Union Seeks
Yule Rides,
Riders Now
The Union Travel Service has
begun its drive to obtain rides for
homeward - bound students at
Christmas time this year.
Under the direction of Staff-
man Harry Blum, '54, the service
has set up a map of the United
States in the Union lobby with
colored pins indicating points in
the nation to which drivers are
needed and places to which riders
are in demand.
STUDENTS WHO wish rides
home are asked to fill out red
cards with name, phone number
and destination. Blue cards, pro-
vided for motorists who seek pas-
sengers, require this information
in addition to a summary of the
route the driver plans to take.
The latter information is re-
quested so the service can pro-
vide passengers part way if ne-
cessary.
Blum explained that passengers
share the costs of the trip with
the driver. Drivers are given the
names of prospective passengers
who register and contact them for
final arrangements.
There is no charge for the serv-
ice and any questions or travel
problems may be referred to the
Union Student Offices between 4
and 6 p.m. weekdays, according to
Blum.
Union Sponsors
Fourth Show Trip
Students will have an oppor-
tunity to see the top Broadway
musical hit "Guys and Dolls" when
the Union makes its fourth the-
ater trip of the season to Detroit,
Jan. 11, the first Friday follow-
ing Christmas recess.
Tickets for the trip, which are
limited, will be sold this week only
between 3 and 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday in the Union Lob-
by. The price for the excursion will
be $3.40, including theatre ticket
and round trip bus fare.
The bus will leave the Union
for Detroit at 6:45 p.m., Jan. 11

Ann Arbor's 1952 March of
Dimes fund raising campaign will
run from Jan. 2 to Jan. 31, double
the length of the 1951 appeal.
Student Players
Call for Tryouts
Tryouts for the Student Players
production of "Joan of Lorraine"
will be held at 7:30 p.m. today,
tomorrow, and Tuesday in the
League.
geeAN

March of Dimes Fund Drive
To Run from January 2-31

-Daly-L. Wilk
NEW OUTLOOK-Student Legislature members Sue Popkin, '54,
and C. A. Mitts, '54, enthusiastically join in the spirit of SL's
"clean up party" in preparation for SL's open house on Wed-

nesday.
Campus
Calendar
Events Today
LECTURES-President Morde-
cai W. Johnson, of Washington's
Howard University, will deliver
two lectures: the first at the 10:45
a.m. services at the First Metho-
dist Church and the second, "The
Negro and Our National Destiny,"
at 8 p.m. in Rackham Assembly
Hall.
* ,'
'U' TV HOUR-A special 40
minute teletour to demonstrate
how law students are trained in
handling court cases, and the reg-
ular telecourse: "Man in His
World: Human Behavior" will be
presented on the University's TV
Hour at 1 p.m. on WWJ-TV, chan-
nel four.
IZFA TALK--Leon Kay, na-
tional vice-president of the Haifa
Technion Society, will speak at
7:30 p.m. at the League on
"The Economic Problems of Is-
rael." The lecture is being spon-
sored by the Intercollegiate Zion-
ist Federation, and is open to the
public.
Coming Events
STANLEY QUARTET-The fi-
nal program of the University
Stanley Quartet will be given at
8:30 p.m. Tuesday in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
EXHIBIT-"Bird Art Today," a
travelling exhibit of the National
Audobon Society, will be on dis-
play during December on the
fourth floor of the Univerity Mu-
seums Bldg.

with Michiga
79c
SCHRISTMAS9~ Ulrich's Boo
CARDS__
CHRISTMAS SU(
lCardsFor R For
Sngle Dad or Son Mo
and Shavemaster Ele
Schick Shaver Ele
Assortments Power Lights Ele
Flash Lights g Pre
Hockey Skates Lar
Electric Drills.C
Tools of all kinds Gir
All kinds of toys for b
at
Book Store FISCHER'S HAI
221 E. Washington

n Seal

Mrs. Douglas Gregory has been
named Ann Arbor chairman of
the 1952 fund drive.
The need for a longer campaign
has been caused by the serious
financial crisis of the National
Foundation for Infantile Paralysis
"In Washtenaw County," Mrs.
Sinn added, "we have had to ask
for more money from the National
Epidemic Aid Fund during the
past three years to meet local
bills, than we have ever raised in,
our county."

k Store

GGESTIONS
r
other or Daughter
ctric Mixers
ctric Irons
ctric Toasters
ctric Waffle Moulds
essure Cookers
rge selection of
Glass Ware
ls' Figure Skates
oys and girls
RD WAR2E
Ph. 2-3295

I

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t

ENGLISH
BICYCLES
Vogel's Bicycle and
Sport Store
113 W. Washington St Ph. 6863

r - - - -- - -

GIFTS

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B'ELTS..
Cowhides, suedes, and
velvets in all, colors.
Priced from 1.00 and up

MAKE
BOOKSTORE
your CHRISTMAS
SHOPPING HEADQUARTERS
Everything in Books, Stationery,
Cards, Seals, and Wrappings
ALSO COMPLETE LINE
OF CHILDREN'S GAMES & TOYS
FOLLETT'S
State Street at North University

for
Sweaters
Nylon
Wool
Cashmere
Zephr
Angora
Slipover - Cardigan
Sleeveless
Colors and White
$398t $1 995/

"HER "

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P'AINT
A ROOM
for CHRISTMAS
YOU CAN DO IT IN A
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California saddle
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Model as shown.
Similar models $2.95 up

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Scarfs... 69c to $2.98
Robes ... $7.95 to $19.95

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Give electrical gifts
for Christmas!
The H. P. JOHNSON CO. have the
largest stock of the finest in electrical
appliances, clocks, and radios. Ask about
our layaway plan. We will gift wrap
or prepare for shipment at no extra cost.

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Cotton, Wool,
Jersey, Crepe,
Nylon, Lace
$398, $1 6

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Skirts
$498 to$1 95
New Formals
and Dresses

ElI I

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