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December 06, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-06

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',

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER , 1951

_______________________________________ I U

'LITTLE PINK' FADES:
Blumrosen Returns to Law Books

i

Campus
Calendar

By BARNES CONNABLE
Alfred William Blumrosen has
returned to the books.
After five years of encampment
in campus nerve centers, the 22-
year-old Detroiter, now standing
in the top ten of the Law School
junior class, has resigned himself
to the fate of all future barristers
-work.
BLUMROSEN'S resignation yes-
terday as chairman of Men's Ju-
diciary came at the peak of an
activities career which found the
energetic, peripatetic campus fig-
ure running the gamut from Daily
City Editor to tryout on the Mich-
igan Law Review (his present sta-
tus).
Despite a "completely unin-
spiring high school existence,"
the bespectacled chain-smoker
managed to stick a foot into the
hottest controversies in the Uni-
versity's golden post-war era.
As a -freshman in Winchell
House, where "I think I was an
officer or something," Blumrosen
got his first taste -of higher edu-
cation between his theoretical
courses and the down-to-earth
mutterings of army veterans.
WITH A HARD-won academic
cushion to prop him up, he started
on the time-consuming route . to
fame and fortune in the Daily
newsroom. As a reporter on the
political science department beat,
he began to learn the great ideals
of newspaperwork: "Everybody
tries to give you the run-around."

-Daily-Mike Snerer
AL "LITTLE PINK" BLUMROSEN

ing to Willow Run-Airport. In the fall of 1947, he way
appointed assistant night edi-
tor, and undertook the city beat
from which he squeezed ten
stories on the change to day-
light saving time that left a
firmAimprint on the fourth es-
tate.
After a stint as night editor, he
began his role of associate editor,
taking this year's senior editors
under his wing and molding them
9 Tinto journalists "almost as good as
our senior staff."
"THEY'D FILLED all the other
positions so there was only one
N 0W ! place left," Blumrosen recalls. He
refers to the day when he was
named city editor, which set off
what is now solemnly spoken of

* * I'
in the publications building as
"The Age of Blumrosen."
Pulling a green eyeshade down
over his grim features, the ner-
vous, quick-thinking newspaper-
men shook the building with his
tirades against incompetent re-
porters who had missed an an-
gle. His "City Editor's Scratch
Pad," which merrily blasted
away at the forces of reaction,
was an abrupt eye-opener to
early morning coffee-drinkers. -
Little Pink Blumrosen ("my
Michigamua name, of course, has
no reference to any political acti-
vities") was at the scene of the
most fabulous campus news of the
decade-the Phillips debate, the
Birth of a Nation controversy, the
political speakers ban and the Ha-
ven Hall holocaust.
Somehow he managed to sal-
vage a B-average in spite of a
crack at varsity debating; work
for Prof. Preston W. Slosson and
Prof. John P. Dawson, Congres-
sional candidates; and member-
ship in Sigma Delta Chi, Pi Sig-
ma Alpha and Sigma Alpha Mu.
YR's To Replace
President Tonigit
The Young Republicans will
elect a president and secretary
when they meet at 7:30 p.m. to-
day in the Union.
The newly elected officers will
serve until the regular elections,
which will be held at the first
meeting next semester.
Tonight's elections were made
necessary by the resignation last
week of the former president, Dave
Cargo, grad. who held the office
for one year.
The question of who should
speak on campus, Sen. Robert Taft
or Gov. Earl Warren, will be
brought up again at tonight's
meeting. This issue, which came
to a head at last Thursday's meet-
ing, precipitated Cargo's resigna-
tion.

* * *
After spending a year of twelve-
hour days in the city room, June
graduate Blumrosen spent the
summer drumming up publicity
for the Michigan State Fair, which
he vaguely recalls "included every-
thing from running cotton candy
for kids to working with the Voice
of America." Then he entered
Law School.
* * *
DESPITE HIS sudden scholastic
surge, Blumrosen's story-hunting
has not been thrown on the rocks
by a long shot. With professional
experience as a campus corres-
pondent for the Detroit Free Press
under his belt, he is now a local
reporter for Time and Life.
Likewise, Blumrosen the poli-
tician is still around. "A lousy
memory for names poses the
biggest stumbling block to any
political ambitions I m i g h t
have," he admits. "But the Mac-
Arthur debate dispelled any
doubts I had about running for
Congress."
But in spite of the claim of wo-
men, politics, Time, Life and the
Law School, Blumrosen is still The
Daily's, although as a veteran
newsman he is chagrined when
today's try-outs offer to show him
around the composing room.
For Blumrosen's greatest exploit
was as a Daily reporter when he
scored a world beat shortly after
the Red coup in Czechoslovakia.
To the amazement of open-
mouthed senior editors, the enter-
prising sophomore placed a long
distance phone call to Czech Presi-
dent Eduard Benes to get first-
hand information on the revolu-
tion.
As the revered chief of The
Daily's newshawks, Blumrosen's
name is now a byword on May-
nard St. for sensitivity, compas-
sion and tolerance. His memory
still lingers over the night desk i*
the Daily newsroom: a large pho-
tograph in the mouth of a grow-
ling lion.

Events Today
BANKERS CONFERENCE-The
thirteenth annual Bank Study
Conference will begin at 9:45 a.m.
today in the Union following a
greeting by University President,
Harlan H. Hatcher. The confer-
ence will continue tomorrow.
MACHINE EXHIBIT-The lat-
est models of machines and office
equipment will be exhibited from
1 to 5 p.m. and from 7 to 9 p.m.
today at Rackham Hall. The ex-
hibition is sponsored by the School
of Business Administration, and
will continue tomorrow.
CHILD STUDY-The University
Young Mother's Child Study Group
will meet at 8 p.m. today in the
home of Mrs. Rosemary Lippett,
1916 Cambridge Rd., for a demon-
stration of child training tech-
niques.
Coming Events
JOHNSON SPEECH-Mordecai
W. Johnson, president of Howard
University, will present the second
in the series of Henry Martin
Loud lectures at 10:45 a.m., Sun-
day in the First Methodist Church
sanctuary and at a general assem-
bly at 8 p.m. Sunday in Rack-
ham Auditorium.
STANLEY QUARTET-The fi-
nal program of the fall season by
the Stanley Quartet will be heard
at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. Included on
the program will be works by Mo-
zart, Beethoven and a Walling-
ford Riegger quintet, dedicated to
the Stanley Quartet.
More Athletics
TalksSlate
(Continued from Page 1)
lem," Perry insisted, "lies in get-
ting Big Ten institutions to come
up to our present standards."
PROF. RALPH W. Aigler, facul-
ty member of the Board and re-
presentative to the Big Ten, de-
clined to comment on Prof. Ken-
iston's proposals.
However, he defended the ad-
ministration of the Board.
"There is nothing to indicate,"
he pointed out, "that the Board
is not properly administrating
Michigaikathletics.
"It is our sincere desire here," he
added, "to operate our athletics
program sensibly and with due re-
gard to the fact the program is
part of the activities of an educa-
tional institution."

Korea Peace Petitions
Arouse Debate on Diag
A milling crowd of students "We are not fighting for anyt
gathered spontaneously on the now in Korea."
diag yesterday to hurl shouts back One YP member argued the
and forth in a debate centering it wasn't for President Trun
on the Korean war. statement that hostilities wil
The demonstration, which at- cease until the armistice is si
tracted more than 50 students, there would be no men dyir
was touched off by Young Pro- Korea now."
gressive members who were pass- He was immediately answ
ing out Korean peace petitions. bHewsm teyane
The Young Progressives held, by one of the bystanders
___________________________ retorted, "We are fighting
hold back the North Kore
I C AbLn ountil we can be sure of defi
. 'ioarmistice terms. The North
reans can't be trusted."
Text Exc-hanue The spontaneous debate sw
ed from the Korean war to
AS N uisanceaU.S.S.R. as one Young Progre
interjected that "peace propa
da comes from Russia, but
The Inter-Fraternity Council is propaganda from the U
abandoning its book exchange, States is 'be strong for peac
Norman Thomas, nianager of the "Well laybe the Russian
store this past semester, announc- ple want peace," another byst
ed at the Student Legislature er argued, "but what about
meeting last night. government?"
The exchange has proved in the This question led to succe
three-and-a-half years of IFC op- queries and discussion fol
eration to be more trouble than for more than an hour.
value, Thomas explained.
Lacking adequate facilities <
and the right to sell new books,
such an enterprise can hardly
be successful, he added.I cien s
Owners of the books now in the
custody of the exchange will have CH-
an opportunity to claim their C K ISTMAS
property. If unclaimed, they will
be sold at auction to a local book-
store. DRIVE

r

thing
at "if
man's
1 not
igned
ng in
ered
who
g to
eans
inite
Ko-
ritch-
o the
essive
agan-
t the
'nited
:e'.~
peo-
tand-
t the
eding
Lowed

Noted Critic
To Lecture
here Today
Nationally known drama scholar
and critic George Freedley, has
chosen an intriguing title, "The
Theatre Swallowed a Tapeworm,"
for the Speech Department-spon-
sored lecture at 4 p.m. today in
Kellogg Auditorium.
Freedley is best known for his
creation and development of the
Theatre Collection in the New
York Public Library. This has
been cited the "world's most com-
plete and comprehensive collection
of theatrical information."
As an author Freedley utilizes
a vast knowledge of theatre. le
is author of several books on the
subject, drama feature writer for
the New York "Morning Tele-
graph" and theatre critic for
"Drama Newsletter of London."
A further facet of his theatrical
career has been Freedley's service
in administrative posts on New
York's Critic's Circle and Ameri
'can National Theatre and Aca-
demy.
Travel Comfort
PLUS
SAFETY AND SAVINGS
WHEN YOU
Co ByTrain
ON YOUR HOLIDAY TRIM
ITS MORE FUNI Plan your holi-
day homecbming by train with
a group of friends. Enjo real
comfort. . . wonderful dining
car meals ... room to roam
around and relax.
YOU CAN DEPEND en getting
home as planned-and getting
back after vacation as well.
Day in day out the railroads
offer you worry-free travel.
SAVE MONEY! Get together 25
or more, all heading home in
the same direction at the same
time. You may return indi-
vidually. Then go GROUP
COACH PLAN, and each save
up to 45% compared to one-
way coach tickets!
Ask your Local (Railroad Agent Now 5
about group or single round-trip savings!
EASTERN'RAILROADS

Daily Classifieds

Dec. 7-8, 1951

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