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November 28, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-28

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951
U _______________________________________

'IMPETUOUS ROYALTY':
Richard II To Open Tonight
q -

Impetuous royalty will fight for
the throne today through .Satur-
day at Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre when the speech department
presents Shakespeare's historical
play, Richard IL
The saga of a king who prizes
his crown above all else, the play
shows how King Richard (Nafe
Katter, Grad) loses his kingship
through his childishness and folly.
* * *
SCOURGE OF HIS regal blood
is Bolingbroke (Richard Burgwin,
Grad., who dispossesses Richard
to become King Henry IV.
A cast of more than thirty
will appear in the production
as noblemen and citizens in
rugged fourteenth century Eng-
land, taking sides in the clash
for executive supremacy.
Backing the lead royalty will be
Kenneth Rosen, as John of Gaunt
and Conrad Stolzenbach, Grad, as
the Duke of York, both uncles to
Richard, and Gwen Amer and
Marilyn McWood, '53, as the
Queen and the Duchess of York.
THE PLAYERS will form a
fancy pattern garbed in colorful
costumes mostly hand-made by
speech department costumers. The
biggest mass project was creating
armor for the rival armies. Used
for this purpose was muslin and
fish netting.
The production is under the di-
rection of Prof. Claribel Baird of
the speech department.
Tickets for all performances are
on sale at the Mendelssohn box
office from 10 a.m. to theatre time,
8 p.m. Regularly priced at $1.20,
90 cents and 60 cents, students
may purchase tickets at a special
fifty cent rate for today's and
tomorrow's performances.
Santa To Visit
Here Monday
Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus, eight
regular reindeer including red-
nosed Rudolph and an elf help-
mate will arrive in Ann Arbor
Monday for a special visit spon-
gored by the Ann Arbor Retail
Merchants Association.
Santa will tour the country in
his sleigh starting at 2:30 p.m.
University students will have a
chance to see him pass on N. Uni-
versity and State Street.
Read Daily Classifieds

Moody Asks
For Unified
U.S. Poliey
By VIRGINIA VOSS
"It's about time the United
States stopped playing politics
with foreign policy," Sen. Blair'
Moody declared last night in the
first address of the Michigan Con-
ference on Higher Education in
Kellogg Auditorium.
"We go into the international
struggle for men's minds severely
handicapped when we have people
in the United States Senate who
claim our international policy is a
blind giveaway," Sen. Moody ex-
plained.
Lashing out at politicians who
would turn the United States into
an isolationist country, the former
Detroit News Washington corres-
pondent cited a confused foreign
policy as the greatest danger to
America today.

Sparks,f alters To Talk
To Journalists Today
_________- - -

BASSO BUFFO HERE:
Baccaloni To Perform
In Concert Tomorrow

Fred Sparks, noted foreign cor-
respondent for the Chicago Daily
News, will be co-speaker with Basil
L. Walters in the second of the
University Lectures in Journalism
series at 3 p.m. today in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Sparks, who has just returned
from Korea, is the guest of Wal-
ters, director of the American So-
ciety of Newspaper Editors, who is
the scheduled speaker. He will ap-
pear at the lecture and at the cof-
fee hour which will follow at 4
p.m. in the journalism department
news room. Both the lecture and
the coffee hour are open to the
public.
THE TWO newspapermen will
also speak tonight at an initiation
banquet of Sigma Delta Chi, jour-
nalism fraternity.
A former editor of Parade,
national Sunday supplement,
and former professor of journal-

.
w

In a Choral Union concert at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Audi-
torium, Salvatore Baccaloni, basso
buffo will feature such program
specialties as Gounod's "Le veau
d'or" from "Faust" and Mozart's
"Ha, wie will ich triumphieren"
from "Die Entfuhrung aus dem
Serail."
The program will also include
selections from Pergolesi, Verdi,
Schubert, Beethoven, Ravel, Mo-
zart and Moussorgsky.
,, , *
SINCE HIS first American tour
in 1938 Baccaloni has entertained
audiences throughout the country
in operas, concerts, operettas and
over major networks. The Metro-
politan, San Francisco and Chi-
cago Opera Companies are among
the companies which have en-
gaged him.
Now boasting a voice range of
two and a half octaves, from low
E flat to high A, the virtuoso
began his musical training at
CORRECTION:
115 E. Liberty
will be open on
MONDAY EVENINGS
instead of what was
incorrectly stated
in Tuesday's paper.

his home in Rome when six
years old as a boy soprani in
choristers school attached to the
Sistine Choir.
After a brief time spent as an
architect Baccaloni returned to
music under the tutelege of Giu-
seppe Kaschmann, baritone.
FOLLOWING his debut in Rome
when twenty-two years old the
basso buffo met Arturo Toscanini,
who was instrumental in bringing
him to La Scala in Milan.
During the years that Bacca-
loni sang with La Scala he also
performed for audiences in Eng-
land, on the Continent and in
North and South America.
In 1930 he sailed for the United
States to sing with the Chicago
Opera Company and in December,
1940, he opened at the Metropoli-
tan Opera House in New York
with a portrayal of "Don Pas-
quale."

BASIL L. WALTERS

-Daily-Larry Bestmann
REGAL RANCOR-Iing Richard II (Nafe Katter, Grad) defends
his crown from Bolingbroke (Richard Burgwin, kneeling) in the
speech department presentation of Shakespeare's Richard II.
The play will open at 8 p.m. today in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Students for Eisenhower Club
To Be Formed Here Dec. 6

NEW IDEAS IN
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Campus political activity quick-
ened last night with an announce-
ment by Dave Cargo, Grad., that
a "Students for Eisenhower" club
will form here December 6.
The group will seek immediate
recognition then by the Office of
Student Affairs, Cargo reported.
The organizers have already made
tentative plans to invite Milton
Eisenhower, brother of Gen. Eis-
enhower, or Sen. Duff (R-Pa.),
another Eisenhower backer, to
speak here in the spring,
Nucleus of the new group in-
cludes Cargo, Len Wilcox, '52, Dave
Belin, '54L, and Walt Hansen,
'53L.
Football To Be
DebateToi
"To be or not to be" in football
will again be discussed as the rela-
tive merits and criticisms of the
intercollegiate gridiron are aired
at the Speech Department debate
at 4 p.m. today in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
Taking the affirmative side will
be varsity football players, Ralph
Stribe, '52, tackle, Merritt Green,
'53, end, newly appointed captain
for next year's team. Phil Van
Houten '52, pre-law student Glen
Grossman, '52, will on the other
hand review the recent arguments
and criticisms against football.
The debate will be handled more
as a discussion on the controver-
sial subject, and audience ques-
tioning will take place after both
sides of the problem have been
presented.
Acting as general chairman for
the debate will be Prof. N. Edd
Miller of the speech department.
DR. FRANK RYBA
OPTOMETRIST
... eye examinations
... glasses
238 Nickels Arcade
Phone 2-88 69

MEANWHILE, the Young Re-
publicans are planning to bring
Gov. Earl Warren to campus. Ac-
cording to Cargo, who is president
of the group, Warren has had to
cut many engagements off of his
schedule because of recent illness,
but is trying to rework his sched-
ule to include an appearance here
in March.
Aso on the political scene, the
lawyers for Taft Club has indi-
cated a desire to join forces with
the Young Republicans and in-
vite Sen. Robert A. Taft to speak
here. Cargo ifelt this would be
impossible because: "We do not
sponsor political candidates as
such in the club and we do not
definitely merge with any politi-
cal committee in order to spon-
sor a candidate."
"Furthermore," Cargo contin-
ued, "the Young Republicans could
not get Senator Taft to speak here
because he does not have an open
date. He doesn't want to come
and speak here because it is against
his policy to speak more than twice
in a state before the Republican
convention next July, and he has
already spoken here twice. Aso, the
Senator thinks he has Michigan
pretty well in the bag."
This week John Tope, former
national president of the Young
Republicans, will speak at the
Young Republican club meeting
Thursday at 7:30 in the League.
Neil Staebler, chairman of the
state Democratic committee, will
be the speaker at the Young Demo-
crats meeting Thursday at 8 p.m.
in the Union.
This week also marks the be-
ginning of a new civil liberties
group on campus. All students who
are interested in dealing with the
problems of academic freedom on
campus may attend the open or-
ganizational meeting at 8 p.m.
Thursday in the League.

SEN. MOODY spoke last night ism at New York University,
on "The Struggle for Men's Minds." Sparks hasecovered eventsin the
Stressing the vital importance of Far East, Europe and Africa,
winning the intellectual struggle, among them MacArthur's occu-
he proceeded to outline the domes- pation of Tokyo.
tic and foreign conflicts this na- Walters, a newspaperman for
tion must resolve if it is to face more than 26 years, is executive
the world with a program of na- editor of the Knight newspaper
tional unity. chain, which includes the Detroit
Besides keeping politics out of Free Press, Chicago Daily News,
foreign poicy, the junior senator Akron Beacon Journal and Miami
stressed the following points: Herald. He has been president of
1. "We must not condone poor the Associated Press Managing
ethics in Congress."The "mink Editors Association and secretary
coat scandals, and "smear cam- of the American Society of News-
paigns" must be issues in the paper Editors.
1952 campaign. Walters' lecture, "The Forgotten
2. Ii we are to have military Right," is the second of nine talks
strength to resist the spread of designed to interpret the signifi-
Russian aggression, we must cance of the daily newspaper in
have domestic controls for a society. Other speakers in the ser-
temporary period. ies will be Nathaniel R. Howard,
3. "A very important thing in editor of the Cleveland News; Les-
winning the minds of Asiatics is ter Markel, Sunday editor of the
making our system live up to New York Times; and Raymond
what documents say it should L. Crowley, managing editor of
be," Moody declared. the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
Americans will have to "elevate
their posture to the' world." In Ski Club Meeting
concluding Moody pointed out that
though Americans are the great- Slated for Today
est salesmen in the world, they
haven't proved it in the interna-
tional test of salesmanship. Ullr, the University ski club, will
Sen. Moody's address followed a h o 1 d its yearly organizational
dinner held last night at the Union meeting at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm.
for representatives of 40 Michigan 3G of the Union.
educational institutions partici- A movie entitled "Focus on
pating in the conference. On hand Skis" will be shown and plans
to welcome the delegates was Uni- will be discussed for between-
versity Vice-President Marvin L. semester and spring vacation ski-
Niehuss. ing trips
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Indian Artist
To TalkToday
Angela Trindade, modern artist
from India, will speak on "Chris-
tian Art in India" at 8:30 p.m. to-
day in Lane Hall at the opening
of an exhibit of her paintings.
Sponsored by the Student Reli-
gious Association and Lane Hall,
the exhibit will be shown from
3:30 to 5:30 p.m. daily until Dec.
6 in the Lane Hall library. Miss
Trindade will be available at these
times to discuss her work.

CHRISTMAS WORK
RUSSELL KELLY OFFICE
SERVICE, DETROIT
is hiring women
for Christmas vacation work.
Typists, stenos, clerks
in Detroit
watch D. 0. B.
Contact Office of
Appointments.

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