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November 28, 1951 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1951-11-28

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951

m I a

'RELEASE FUMBLED':
New Tactics Needed with
Russia, 'loies '--Vogeler

NEW YORK -(RP)- Robert A.
Vogeler says the Truman Admin-
istration fumbled his release and
he is afraid it will do the same
for William Oatis unless the Uni-
ted States adopts new and cour-
ageous tactics in dealing with Rus-
sia and her "colonies."
Vogeler is the American busi-
ness man who was sentenced to
15 years in Communist Hungary
Expenditure
Report Rapped
By Sen._Gillette
WASHINGTON-(lP)-Sen. Gil-
lette (D-Iowa) hit out at "farcical"
reporting of campaign costs yes-
terday as the Ohio election inves-
tigation produced new multi-mil-
lion dollar figures.
In exchange of big spending
charges between Republican Sen-
ator Taft and Joseph T. Ferguson,
the Democrat he beat in 1950,
Ferguson went all the way up to
$100,000,000 for Taft costs. He said
he reached that height by using
the same formula Taft used in
figuring Ferguson spending, to in-
clude the expense of radio and
newspaper backing.
x * *
GILLETTE, CHAIRMAN of the
subcommittee making the inquiry,
voiced his criticism as Ferguson
testified in support of his more
seriously advanced estimate that
the Republicans spent $5000,000
for Taft last year. Taft, a witness
Monday, had guessed $2,000,000
was laid out for Ferguson.
Ferguson's figure for his own
total campaign cost was $107,004, .
of which $2,270 was reported as
his personal spending. Taft had
figured his own campaign cost
$600,000 to $700,000, listing his
personal outlays at $1,800.
Gillette commented that evi-
dence before the committee indi-
cated that "hundreds of thou-
sands" were spent on behalf of
both men.
"The travesty of it becomes
so apparent," the investigations
chairman said, contrasting the tes-
timony with the figures in the
candidates' own formal spending
reports.
He assured Ferguson he was
not singling him out for criti-
cism, telling the witness "you
have plenty of company," both
Democrat and Republican.
The Iowan said there seems to
be a need for legislation to curb
practices that circumvent the aims
of the law limiting campaign
spending. Particularly he con-
demned what he called "subter-
fuge" involved in the use of "pub-
lic service" advertising in political
campaigns, for which the adver-
tisers can take tax deductions as
business costs.
NOW SHOWING

on charges of being a U.S. spy. He
served 14 months and was released
last April 28 after the U.S. agreed
to make certain concessions to
Hungary.
OATIS, ASSOCIATED Press cor-
respondent in Prague, was arrest-
ed five days before Vogeler was
released. He was sentenced to 10
years on charges of being a spy.
His trial has been denounced by
the Western world as a travesty of
justice.
Vogeler, writing in the Satur-
day Evening Post, says both he
and Oatis were imprisoned on
orders from Prime Minister Stal-
in carried out by Hunga-ian and
Czech secret police.
He says he was released, on cer-
tain conditions, "by Stalin's Hun-
garian stooges. Oatis was arrest-
ed five days earlier, in flagrant
violation of the spirit of those con-
ditions, by Stalin's Czechoslova-
kian stooges. My release, there-
fore, was meaningless to everyone
except poor Oatis and myself and
our respective families."
VOGELER SAYS also that his
close friend, Capt. Eugene Karpe,
was murdered in Austria in March,
1950, "on my account." Karpe had
served for three years as U.S. Nav-
al attache in Romania. His body
was found in the Salzburg Tun-
nel.
Some of Karpe's friends in
Vienna said they were convinced
he was hurled from the train by
Red agents. U.S. Army authori-
ties said the death could have
been accidental.
Vogeler says his worst shock on
being released was to discover that
Karpe was dead, Oatis was in pri-
son, that the United States had
been forced to rescind its ban on
private travel to Hungary, reopen
the Hungarian consulates in Cleve-
land and New York, restore Hun-
gary'seproperty in the U.S. zone
of Germany and end Voice of
America broadcasts from Germany
to Hungary.
Vogeler says the Congressional
action imposing an embargo on
Czech trade is only one of the steps
that should be taken in reprisal
for jailing Oatis. He urges the ex-
tension of the embargo to Russia
and all her satellites.
Movie T op ic
To Be Canada
The University Extension Serv-
ice and the Audio-Visual Educa-
tion Center will sponsor three mo-
vies on Canada at 4:10 p.m. today
in Kellogg Auditorium.
The first picture, "Canada-
Canada's New Frontiers," depicts
life in a community which is de-
veloping the new frontiers in the
country.
"Canada-Home of the French
Canadians" shows the influence of
French culture in Canada and the
life of a people bound together by
an ethnic tie.
The simple pattern of tradition-
al living in Nova Scotia is por-
trayed in the final movie, "Happy
Valley."

To Be Rated
ByStudents
Literary students will have a
chance to turn the tables on their
professors and instructors next
week when questionnaires are dis-
tributed for the third student-
faculty evaluation program spon-
sored by the Student Legislature.
The 42,000 blanks scheduled to
be distributed Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday have undergone
little change since the last evalu-
ation in the spring of 1950. Main
difference will be more space for

student comments.
* *

*

IN ADDITION to serving as a
guide to teachers who do not see
the unsigned questionnaires until
the end of the semester, many de-
partments consider the evalua-
tions when promotions are recom-
mended to the Regents.
Student-faculty evaluations in
the past have indicated that
most students are more than
satisfied with the quality of
their instruction. ° In the last
evaluation, the average grade
which students gave instructors
was well above the all campus
average.
Printing and distributing of
questionnaires is being handled by
the Student Legislature, but once
they are filled out they are the
property and responsibility of the
literary school.
The project costs between five
and seven thousand dollars as
correlating and tallying the re-
sults of the survey requires spe-
cial help.
The University was the first
large school to install the evalua-
tion program. Since the first
questionnaires were passed out in
1948, more than 200 colleges and
universities have written SL re-,
questing information on how the
program here is handled.

the beginnI g of second semester. In-
terested graduate students should make
an appointment with Mrs. Healy in the
Office of the Dean of Women as soon
as possible.
Registered student sponsored social
events for the coming week-end:
November 30-
Alpha Kappa Psi
Couzens Hall
Kappa Kappa Psi
"M" Club
Stockwell Hall
December I-
Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Kappa Kappa
Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
Chi Phi
Delta Chi
Delta Tau Delta
Kappa Sigma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Les Voyageurs
Phi Delta Phi
Phi Gamma Delta
Phi Chif
Philippine Michigan Club
Phi Sigma Kappa
Prescott House
Sigma Delta Tau
Sigma Nu
Sigma Pi
Theta Chi
Theta Xi
Trigon
Tyler
Williams
December 2-
Graduate Outing Club
Hillel
Phi Delta Phi
Attendance by women-studens at
dancing classes inmen'stresidences
(fraternities and residence halls) has
been approved on an experimental
basis by the Office of Student Affairs
and the Office of the Dean of Women.
These classes will close at 9 p.m.
Personnel Interviews:
Tuesday, December 4, a representative
of the Canadian Life Assurance Com-
pany of Jackson, Michigan, will be' in-
terviewing February graduates of Bus-
iness Administration for life insurance
selling leading to possible Branch Sup-
ervision Work or Management or pos-
sible Head Office Appointments.
Thursday, December 6, a representa-
tive of the American Seating Company
of Grand Rapids, Michigan, will be in-
terviewing February and June aradu-
ates, both men and women, of the
following: Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering; Business Administration
for Sales; Personnel Administration de-
gree and PhD in Psychology for In-
dustrial Relations; Accounting; Secre-
tarial graduates; Business Administra-
tion or Industrial Engineering for
Plant Supervision.
Personnel Requests:
Edwards Brothers, an Ann Arbor pub-
lishing firm, is interested in LS&A and
Business Administration graduates for
their executive training program.
The Dravo Corporation of Pittsburgh
Pennsylvania, has openigs for J.ne
Business Administration graduates who
have an Accounting major for positions
in their Accounting Department; and
also for an Analytical Chemist with I
to 2 years laboratory or research ex-
perience in chemical industry, to work
with a research group.
The Experiment Station of the Ha-
waiian Sugar Planters' Association of
Honolulu, Hawaii, is interested in Me-
chanical, Chemical, and Electrical En-
gineering students who will receive
their degrees in 1952 and who may be
interested in the sugar factory tech-
noogy program.
The Cincinnati Milling Machine Con-
pany of Cincinnati, Ohio, has an op-
ening for a chemist, male or female,
for controla ork, development, and r-
search,
The Brownlee Company of Detroit,
Michigan, is in need of an Architectural
Draftsman, capable of detailing small
houses for work at their Milan, Michi-
gan Plant.
Contact the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Building, for de-
tails and appointments for interviews.
Lectures
University Lecture in Journalism. Ad-
dress by Basil Walters, Executive Edi-
tor, Knight Newspapers, Inc.,"The For-
gotten Right." 3 p.m., wed., Nov. 28,
Rackham Amphitheater. Informal cof-
fee hour, 4 p.m., Dept. of Journalism
news room. Both the lecture and cof-
fee hour are open to the public.
Lecture, auspices of Lane Hall. "Chris-
tian Art in India." Angela Trindade,

Indian painter, 8:15 p.m., Wed., Nov.
28, Lane Hall.
Academic Notices
Seminar in Anthropology for graduate
students and concentrates, Fri., Nov. 30.
3 to 5 p.m. third floor, Old Maternity
Hospital. Colored slides of fossil man
specimens will be shown and discussed
by Dr. Thieme.
Engineering Mechanics Seminar: Wed.,
Nov. 28, 3:45 p.m., 101 West Engineer-
ing Building. Prof. W. Kaplan will
speak on "A General Approach to Par-
tial Differential Equations."
Doctoral examination for Alvin Fran-
cis Beale, Jr., Chemistry; thesis: "The
Heatof Vaporization of Mercury," Wed.,
Nov. 28, 3003 Chemistry Bldg., 1:15 p.m.
Chairman, E. F. Westrum.-
Department of Fisheries Seminar: 7
p.m., Thurs., Nov. 29, East Conference
Room, Rackham Building.
Seminarsin Applied Mathematics 4
p.m.. Thurs. Nov. 29. 247 West Engi-
neering. Dr. Raoul Bott will speak on
The Fundamental Theorem of Net-
work Synthesis." Refreshments at 3:30
in room 274 W. Engineering.
Geometry Seminar: Thurs, Nov. 29,
4:10 p.m., 3001 Angell Hall. Mr. Ben-
nett will be the speaker.
Seminar in Complex Variables: 2:30
p.m., on Wednesday, November 28, in
room 247 West Engineering. Mr. Cris-
ler will speak on Dirichlet series.
Seminar in Physical Chemistry. Dr.
Wilbur Bigelow will discuss "The Non-
spreading of Oil Drops on Polar Hydro-
carbon Films," at 4:07 p.m.. Wed., Nov.
28, in Room 2308 Chemistry Bldg. Visi-
tors are welcome.
Seminar in Organic Chemistry. Ar-
thur Nersasian will speak on "Cyclopro-
pene and Cyclopropene Compounds,"
at 7:30 p.m., Wed., Nov. 28. in Room
1300 Chemistry. Visitors are welcome.
Concerts
Concert. Salvatore Baccaloni, bass,
assisted at the piano by Marcel Frank,
will give the sixth concert in the Choral
Union Series, Thurs., Nov. 29, at 8:30
o'clock, in Hill Auditorium. Mr. Bacca-
loni will offer a program from works
of the following composers: Pergolesi,
Gounod, Mozart, Verdi, and Moussorg-
sky; as well as group of Negro spiritu-
als.
Tickets are on sale daily at the of-
fices of the Musical Society in Burton
Tower; and will also be available at
the Hill Auditorium box office after 7
o'clock on the night of the perform-
ance.
Events Todayv
Opening tonight: "King Richard 1"'
by William Shakespeare. Presented by
the Department of Speech at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre at 8 p m. The
play will be given 4 performances,
running through Saturday night. Re-
maining tickets may be purchased at
the Mendelssohn box office from 10
am, to 8 n.m. daily. Secal studnt
rate offered for Wed and Thurs. nights
only.
Canterbury Club: Chaplain's Open
House, 702 Tappan Avenue, 7:30 p.m.
U. of M. Rifle Club will practice at
the ROTC Rifle Range starting at 7
p.m. It is important that all the club
members be there because the final se-
lection of a team to fire in the match
Saturday with OSU and MSC will he
made. Also a postal match is scheduled.
Hillel: Yiddish Class meets at 7:30
p.m., Lane Hall. Instructor: Mr. Leon-
ard Tompakov. Everyone is welcome.
Congregational- Disciples Guild: Sup-
per Discussion Groups, 5:30 to 7 p.m.,
at the Guild House. Freshman Discus-
sion Group, 7 to 8 p.m., Guild House.
Folkaand SquareDance Group will
meet at 8 p.m., Barbour Gym. Please
come and bring your friends.
Ulr Ski Club. Organizational meet-
ing. New members invited. Movie,
"Focus on Skis." 7:30 p.m., Room 3-G,
Union.
Electrical Engineering Research Dis-
cussion Group will meet at 4 p.m., 2084
East Engineering. Mr. Dick Brown will
(Continued on Page 4)

LOST AND FOUND
LOST November 17th in or near VFW-
Brown leather billfold. Reward. Phone
2-2252, ask for Harry. )60L
FOR SALE
BOMBER JACKETS $9.95. Satin twill,
quilt lining, water repellent. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington,.)3
TWO FORMALS-One white, one yellow.
Size 10, worn once. Call 5617 after 4
o'clock. )81
CHICKERING Grand Piano, antique bed
and sideboard, books, pingpong table,
girls bicycle, toys, misc. household
goods. 140 Underdown Rd., Barton
Hills, 2 to 8 p.m. Phone 6189. )83
1849 CROSLEY-Good condition, Will
finance at about $15 per month.
First payment in January, call 2-5628.
after 6 p.m. call Dexter 4558. )84
TYROL CANADIAN SKI BOOTS - Two
weeks use, inside lacing, size 912 to 10.
Phone 2-8877. )85
BABY PARAKEETS or budgies, canaries,
bird supplies and cages. Open 1 to 7
p.m. 562 S. Seventh St. Phone 5330.
)4
STUDENTS! An organization that cov-
ers five states presents diamond rings
at prices designed for you. Let me
show you how to save uLp to 50",, on
the BEST QUALITY STONES. Phone
2-1809 evenings. L. E. Anger. )15P
TAILS AND ACCESSORIES-Size 38-40.
$20.00. Bob, 3-0521, ext. 105 2 rings.
)8

.. f r . r .. .;..
°. a
9Yp' 1' ,,

f

APARTMENT for men. Two rooms, fur-
nished, modern kitchen, utilities in-
cluded, $75.00. Call 2-9410 or 2-7108.
)12R
LARGE SINGLE ROOM for a quiet man
student at 1021 Hill Street. Phone
2-7133. )30R
SUITE--Single or double-Workingman
or student. Near campus and Union.
Shower, hot water, $5.50 each. 509 S.
Division, near Jefferson .)IOR
FOR RENT
ROOMS & SUITES FOR MEN-For those
who'll appreciate congenial landlady.
On campus. Call before 4 p.m. 2-0542.
)11F
ATTRACTIVE four-room suite for 3-5
men. 1402 Hill. Call after 5:30 p.m.
}1R
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -
Sales, rentals, and service. M rrill's,
314 S. State St. )3B
TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
als at Office Equipment Co. 215 E.
Liberty. )4B
EXPERT TYPING Reasonable rates. 329
S. Main. Phone 3-4133 or 29092 eve-
nings. )8B
TYPING (experienced) - Theses, term
papers, stencils. Phone 7590, 830 S.
Main. )6B
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
TYPING-Neat, fast and accurate. Call
2-2507 days, 3-8054 nights. Ask for E.
Woodard. )20B
PERSONAL
JOIN THE Ullr Ski Club. First meeting
Wednesday,Nov. 28, 7:30, Room 3G
Union. Movie "Focus on Skiis" will
be shown. )22P
MODERN Beauty Shop -- Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ma-
chineless or cold wave, $5.00, shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1.00. Hair-
cut $1.00. Phone 8100. )13P

ROOMS FOR RENT

PERSONAL
STOP SNOW - SAVE DOUGH
I have a supply of Nationally Adver-
tised $65 Cabardine Storm Coats -
Student price only $45. Displayed at
721 N. "U" or call 3-8302. )23P
HELP WANTED
MUST BE EXPERIENCED - Women's
better apparel and ready-to-wear. Ex-
cellent conditions, top earnings, steady
or part time Hospitalization, paid
vacations. Reply Box 2, Mich. Daily
or phone S. Davis, Detroit, WA 8-9321.
24H
YOUNG LA UY WANTED to help during
Christmas rush. Part or full time
selling: and stock work. Apply at Fol-
lett's Book Store, 322 South State
Street. 75H
GROUP WORKER - Some secretarial
ability, interesting work with student
group. Hillel Foundation. Ph. 3-4129.
) 33H
A MARSHALL FIELD
OWNED COMPANY
Executive opportnity in Michigan
for college graduate, male or female.
We are seeking the person who quali-
fies, that desires $20,000 a year income
by time they are 30. Other openings
for part time work during the school
year, also summer positions open.
Writs' teday to Robert Gibson, 400
Buhl Bldg., Detroit 26, giving home
address and school phone number.
) 74H
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED BOARDERS-Lunch and din-
ners-Rates $1.75 a day. Ph. 8301,
825 Tappan. )12M
Any Day Now
METAMORPHOSIS with
Oana Elear, Pat Newhall, Bettp Ellis
)11M
TRANSPORTATION
YOUNG COUPLE want passengers to
Florida XmasLvacation. Cali 2-8827
after 5. )11T
WANTED TO RENT
STUDENT desires nice room or rooms,
3-8942 after 5. )4W

t

L,

k.

ROOMS FOR RENT

DAILY
OFFIICIAL
BULLETIN

STUDENT to share apartment with
Grad. students. Modern kitchen. gas
heat, continuous hot water. Student
landlord. Call 3-1791 before 10:30 a.m.
27R
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
JUST I
ARRIVED
a new shipment of
TAPE RECORDERS.
COME IN - Let us
recommend one
for your needs,
HI.FI /ec'Idi9
STUDIO
521 East Libertyj
Phone 2-3053

WHAT TO DO FRIDAY?
MICHIGAN UNION
offers
"OKLAHOMA"
BUS TRIP TO DETROIT

t

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
2552 Administration Building before
3 p.m. the day preceding publication
(11 am. on Saturday).
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951
VOL.'LXIV, NO. 55
Notices
Regents' Meeting: Fri., Dec. 21, 3:30
p.m. Communications for considera-
tion at this meeting must be in the
President's handsnot later than Dec.
13.
Choral Union Members whose attend-
ance records are clear, will please call
for their courtesy passes to the Bacca-
lont concert on the day of the per-
formance, Thurs.,nNov. 29-between the
hours of 9:30 and 11:30, and 1 and 4
o'clock, at the offices of the'University
Musical Society in Burton Tower. After
4 o'clock no passes will be issued.
Employment Interviews:
Representatives of McDonnell Air-
craft Corporation, St. Louis, Missouri,
will interview February graduates from
Aeronautical, Civil, Mechanical and In-
dustrial Engineering Departments on
Wednesday and Thursday, November 28
and 29 in the Department of Aeronau-
tical Engineering. Positions available
in their Airplane, Helicopter or Missile
Divisions. They would also like to in-
terview alumni desirous of change and
undergraduates who want summer em-
ployment.
There will be several vacancies in the
residence hall personnel staff (Resident
Assistants and Residence Counselors) at

3.90 inclusive

Fri., Nov.30

LIMITED NUMBER OF TICKETS
IN UNION LOBBY WED. & THURS., 3-5

®sw... ..;9

SALVATOlIE BACCALONI

BASSO BUFFO of the
METROPOLITAN OPERA
CHORAL UNION SERIES
THURSDAY, 8:30, NOV. 29

a..gw...a..

..Mmw.

STARTS TODAY

EXTENDED RUN
TONIGHT - FRIDAY - SATURDAY
Nov. 28-30, and Dec. 1
The Knight of the Burning Pestle
ARTS THEATER CLUB
ANN ARBOR'S PROFESSIONAL THEATER
MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW!

I

t

PLUS
An Adaptation ru
ALEXANDRE DUMAS'&
I ::

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
L4sC Till 5 P.M.
44c Daily 1-1 1 P.M.
-Last Times Today

owmwmgmnmmwmmmm:

MMMII

i

i

I

CINEMA GUIL )
and
Hillel
present
Jean Vigo's
Two Masterpieces
L'ATALANTE
and
r1.~Tb T1 U' n ! d1vT1~TTIT F7T ~

.A

MAKE

1-1

1Sett 4
BOOKSTORE

Starts Thursday -

I

I

YOUR CHRISTMAS

SHOPPING.HEADQUARTERS

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