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November 27, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-27

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- ,

State Confab
On Education
Starts Today
o v e r 200, representatives of
Michigan coleges and universities
will attend the fifth Annual Con-
ference on Higher Education in
Michigan scheduled to convene
here today and tomorrow.
Centering around "The Intellec-
tual Phase of the World Conflict,"
the University sponsored confer-
ence will include discussion ses-
sions and addresses open to the
public.
* * *
THE CONFERENCE will get un-
derway at a closed dinner meeting
tonight in the Union. University
Vice-President Marvin L. Niehuss
will preside, and Prof. Algo D.
Henderson, of t h e education
school, is scheduled to give a
short talk.
Sen. Blair Moody will high-
light the evening session with
an address on "Struggle for
Men's Minds" at 8:30 p.m. in
Kellogg Auditorium.
The Wednesday morning meet-
ing will consist of a lecture by
John S. Millis, President of West-
ern Reserve University, followed
by a discussion session with Presi-
dent of Wayne University David
D. Henry, Dean John W. Hollen-
bach of Hope College, and John
R. Richards, Special Assistant to
the Secretary, Department of the
Army.
Both the lecture and discussion
session will be held at 9:30 a.m.
tomorrow in Rackham Amphithe-
ater.
fpp /vJ~Y..".... ....::\. /].
Here's your chance
to get rid of those
neckties you never
wear. TRADE 'EM! -
for some you'll like.
Name your favorite
style or pattern.
We'll try to get it for
you-perhaps with a
PalmBeach, New
York or Honolulu
label, too!
- Mail us five ties and
- a dollar. We'll send
', , you five different
ones, freshly cleaned
and pressed. Postage
paid.
r The Tie Exchange, Box 1901 1
I New Haven, Conn. 1
1 Here'* a dollar and five ties.
I Send me five others - freshly
I cleaned and pressed in exchange.
ame I
I Address I
.Tow - - r-s State
G~~~~~~~~~. ........... -,..------

LEGISLATION DUE:
Ohio Elections Probe
Constructive -- Lederle

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1951
'U' Symphony Orchestra
To Perform Tonight at Hill

By ZANDER HOLLANDER
The man who will help pick up
the pieces in the Ohio 1951 elec-
tion inquiry last night told what
the voting public can expect from
the just-begun hearings.
Yesterday's opening blast, a
Taft denial of any "special in-
terest" support, was only the be-
ginning of a parade of some 25
witnesses before the Senate Elec-
tions subcommittee, according to
Prof. John W. Lederle, special con-
* * *

41

SEN. ROBERT A. TAFT
Walters Slated
To TalkHere
Basil L. Walters, executive edi-
tor of Knight Newspapers and di-
rector of the American Society of
Newspaper Editors, will discuss
"The Forgotten Right" in the sec-
ond of the University Lectures in
Journalism series at 3:00 p.m. to-
morrow in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
The lecture, which is open to
the public, will be followed at 4:00
p.m. by an informal coffee hour
in the Department of Journalism
news room.
Walters will also speak at jour-
nalism fraternity Sigma Delta
Chi's initiation banquet.

sultant to the Gillette sub-com-
mittee.
Prof. Lederle is director of the
University's Institute of Public
Administration.
*, * *
PARTISAN politicians who ex-
pect Democratic Senator Guy Gil-
lette's sub-committee to perform
a hatchet-job on "Mr. Republican"
Taft are going to be disappointed,
Prof. Lederle indicated.
"There is an almost total ab-
sence of partisanship on this com-
mittee," he said.
What they are after is not an.
expose of corrupt practices in
Ohio or elsewhere but a basis
for determining what kind of
legislature is needed to correct
American election abuses, ac-
cording to Special Consultant
Lederle.
When they get to this phase of
operations Prof. Lederle will head
for the nation's capital to assist
in drafting the committee's rec-
ommendations.
* * *
THE CRUX of the problem, as
illustrated in the Tydings-Butler
campaign in Maryland and the
Taft-Ferguson contest in Ohio,
lies in candidates not being held
responsible for the activities of
their backers, Prof. Lederle be-
lieves.
"We are never going to put a
real limit on expenditures as
long as a state committee can
spend money for a candidate
without his being accountable
for it," he said.
There ws only $1800 spent di-
rectly by Taft in his 1951 cam-
paign for re-election to the Sen-
ate, Prof. Lederle noted. Yet some
estimates show that $1,200,000
may have been closer to the real
total.
WHAT LEDERLE would like to
see is a curtailment of what he
calls "beating of dead horses" and
more attention to the future.
One possibility, he hinted, is a
Congressional appropriation for
the readying of machinery to
make a thorough analysis of elec-
tion abuses in the coming presi-
dential campaign.
Five Get Lane
Hall Positions
Five new members have been
appointed to the Lane Hall Board
of Governors for this year.
Faculty representative and new
chairman of the board is Prof.
Frank L. Huntley of the English
department. He replaces Prof.
William Frankena, past chair-
man.
Lewis Reimann, a local alum-
nus, replaces James Kennedy, an
Ann Arbor lawyer, on the board.
Three student members elected
are Ann Cotton '52, president of
the Student Religious Association,
Bob Hartman, '53, SRA vice-presi-
dent and Betty Adams, '54, presi-
dent of Inter-Guild.
Other members of the board are
Prof. Ronald Freedman of the so-
ciology department, Prof. Edward
Ham, of the romance languages
department, Harold Logan, princi-
pal of the Ann Arbor west-side
junior high school, Prof. Howard
McClusky of the School of Edu-
cation, Prof. Carlton Wells of the
English department and Dean of
Students Erich A. Walter.

Wayne Dunlap will conduct the
87 members of the University
Symphony Orchestra in their an-
nual fall concert at 8:30 p.m. to-
day in Hill Auditorium.
Featuring Theodore Johnson,
violinist, the program will include
Rossini's "Overture to 'Semira-
mide''', Beethoven's "Symphony
No. 4 in B-flat major, Op. 60,"
"Symphonie Espagnole, Op. 21" by
Lalo and Copland's "El Salon
Mexico."
ROSSINI'S "Semiramide," the
thirty-fourth in a series of operas
written for the Italian theatre be-
tween the years of 1810 and 1823,
revolves around the semi-real,
semi-mythical figure of the Assy-
rian Queen who was a favorite in
operas from the middle of the
seventeenth century to the end of
the eighteenth,
Intense joy, exuberance and
warmth characterize Beetho-
ven's symphony, while piquant

4,"

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INSIDE LOOKING OUT-Despite varied sports and occupational activities, inside, this group oe Red
war prisoners sits beside a tent in Koje-do prison- of-war camp looking at the outside world. Exchange
of these prisoners and many more is one of the topics being discussed by Communists and UN truce
negotiators at Panmunjom.

j. 4x 6 inch cotton = x 12 lochcoon
* only 25c * my 3$c
SPEC9ALt torq* 12018 inch floguso"$Y 604
Seed your ordwrs now with manly eiclosed to.
NASH ENTERPRISES, Dept. N10
sa 10S1. G. P. O.. Now Yodt I.N. Y.

i

'Lateconers' Cause Pain
To 'Richard II' Producers

CHRISTMAS
CARDS
Chnstmas Wrappings
Stationery Gift Boxes,
Fountain Pens
TYPEWRITERS, Sales
Service, Rentals
SMORRILL'S
314 S. State St., Ph. 7177

Travelers which have failed to
arrive in Ann Arbor on schedule
have caused problems for the pro-
ducers of "Richard II."
A traveler is a type of draw cur-
tain which allows a stage to be
sectioned off for quick scene
changes. Needed for this week's
speech department presentation of
the Shakespearian history, the
travelers are still enroute to the
city, and are not expected until
next week.
BUT SET designer, Jack Bender,
Hillel Draws
Closer to Goal
For Building
A $50,000 increase in funds for
the new B'nai Brith Hillel build-
ing was reported at a progress
report meeting held in Detroit last
week, according to Rabbi Herschel
Lymon, Hillel director.
The $500,000 two-story building,
to be located at 1429 Hill, is now
three-quarters finished and will be
ready for occupancy early in the
second semester, he said.
Rabbi Lymon reported on Uni-
versity Hillel activities at the De-
troit meeting. Dr. A. L. Sachar,
president of Brandeis University
and chairman of the National Hil-
lel Commission was the principal
speaker.
The cornerstone for the building
was laid last June.
Hillel activities are now being
conducted in Lane Hall.
'Oklahoma' Trip
Tickets on Sale
Students who want to see the hit
musical Oklahoma in Detroit Fri-
day may purchase tickets for the
Union's theatre trip between 3 and
5 p.m. today through Thursday in
the Union lobby, according to Rue-
di Gingras, '54, for $3.90, round
trip.
The theatre-goers' bus will leave
the Union at 6:45 p.m., Friday.

of the speech department, and his
staff have rigged up some old ones
to do for the production, which
will run tomorrow through Satur-
day at Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre.
"They might just squeak a
little," Bender said, "but they
have solved our problem."
A slightly more personal prob-
lem has confronted two of the male
leads, William Hadley, '52, and
Richard Burgwin, Grad. They both
are costumed in medieval armor,
and have had some trouble mas-
tering their movements in the rig-
id apparel.
They claim all kinks will be iron-
ed out, however, by the time the
first curtain rises at 8 p.m. to-
morrow. Tickets for the perform-
ances will be available at the Men-
delssohn box office.
Regularly priced at $1.20, 90)
cents and 60 cents, all tickets will
be specially priced at 50 cents for
tomorrow and Thursday's per-
formances.
Football Problem
To Be Debated
Once again the pros and cons of
college football will be the issue
for discussion at a Speech De-
partment sponsored debate which
will be held at 4:00 p.m. tomorrow,
at Rackham Lecture Hall.
Varsity football players - end,
Merritt Greene, '53, and tackle,
Ralph Stribe, '52 - will defend
football, as speech major Phil Van
Houten, '52, and pre-law student
Glen Grossman, '52 will review all
recent criticism and arguments
against football. The meeting will
be open to the public.

Artist To Talk
on Indian Art
At Lbane Show
An exhibit of modern Indian art
by Angela Trindade will open at
8 p.m. tomorrow at Lane Hall with
a reception at which the artist
will lecture on Christian art in
India and comment informally on
the paintings.
The display will continue in
Lane Hall through Dec. 6. It will
be open to the public from 3:30
to 5:30 p.m. daily.
M i s s Trindade's "Birth of
Christ" watercolors, as illustrated
in Indian symbolism, continues
the tradition of transferring the
story of Christ to the artist's own
country. The traditional Indian
colors and figures are used to por-
tray the Christmas story through
Eastern eyes to the Indian people.
The daughter of Antonio Xavier
Trindade, the 'Rembrandt of the
East,' Miss Trindade graduated
from the Bombay Art School. Her
paintings have been awarded sev-
eral prizes in art exhibitions in her
own country and have been dis-
played in Rome, Paris, Lucerne,
Brussels, and the United States.
Travel Comfort
PLUS
SAFETY AND SAVINGS
WHEN YOU
GoU ByTrain
ON YOUR HOLIDAY TRIP

rhythms and harmonized melo-
dies are notable in Lalo's.
The spirit of the Mexican peo-
ple inspired Aaron Copland, con-
temporary American composer, to
write his "El Salon Mexico."
The concert is open to the pub-
lic.

Big Warm Blankets,
I $
r'1 0 and up
ULRICH'S BOOK STORE

THE SOUTH
WILL RISE
AGAIN!
Jon tht thousands of Dam-
yankees from coast-to-coast
who are proud to fly these
colorful CONFEDERATE
BATTLE FLAGS on cars,
motorcycles, a n d every-

EFFECTIVE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26
We will be open Mondays and closed Saturdays
Cottage Inn Restaurant
S.. HOME OF PIZZA . .
7 A.M.-2 P.M. ... 5 P.M.-9 P.M.
512 East William

Doctors warn smokers about throats.
Kaywoodie Pipes have Three Throat-Guards
to give extra throat protection.

FIRST THROAT-GUARD: "Wider-opening"bit.
Spreads out smoke, helps cool it. No hot
smoke to irritate throat or "bite" tongue.

DE 'S

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CHICAGO COLLEGE of

I

115 W. Liberty St.
CHRISTMAS IDEAS
Old Time Car Kits Fountain Pens
Model Plane Kits Typewriters

Model Railroad Kits
Model Boat Kits
' Hobby Tools
Hobby Materials
OPEN EVENINGS TILL

Bill Folds
Desk Accessories
Lamps
Filing Equipment
CHRISTMAS

J. Paul Sheedy* Switched to Wildroot Cream-Oil
Because He Flunked The Finger-Nail Test

Mademoi elle
for Christmas
In an exclusive interview with MLLE,
Marlon Brando and Yul Brynner create
the kind of woman they'd like to find
under their Christmas tree.
for Christmas
In Gift Bulletin Board you'll get a Christ.
masy slant on new records to hear, new
plays to see, new books to read, new
shops to go shopping in.
for Christmas
Tn the Hnme for Chijstmas fashion naaaes

OPTOMETRY
(Nationally Accredited)
An outstanding college serving
a splendid profession.
Doctor of Optometry degree in
three years for students enter-
ing with sixty or more semester
credits in specified Liberal Arts
courses.
REGISTRATION MAR. 3
Students are granted profes-
sional recognition by the U. S.
Department of Defense and
Selective Service.
Excellent clinical facilities.
Athletic and recreational activi-
ties. Dormitories on the campus.
CHICAGO COLLEGE OF
OPTOMETRY
350 Belden Avenue
Chicago 14, Illinois

IT'S MORE FUN IPlan your holi-
day homecoming by train with
a group of friends. Enjoy real
comfort ... wonderful dining
car meals ... room to roam
around and relax.
YOU CAN DEPEND on getting
home as planned-and getting
back after vacation as well.
Day in day out the railroads
offer you worry-free travel.
SAVE MONEYI Get together 25
or more, all heading home in
the same direction at the same
time. You may return indi-
vidually. Then go GROUP
COACH PLAN, and each save
up to 45% compared to one-
way coach tickets!

Ask your Local Railroad Agent Now
about group or single round-trip savingsl
EASTERN RAILROADS

SECOND THROAT-GUARD: Exclusive, patented THIRD THROAT- GUARD: World's best im-
"DRINKLESS" device. Cuts down irritating ported briar. It's specially heat-resitant and
tars...keeps every pipeful lit longer. porous.Makessmokecooler...less irritating.
GUARD THAT THROAT,'DOCTORSSAY!
Only KAYWOODIE pipes have these Three
Throat-Guards for extra throat protection!
Don't gamble with your throat! Kaywoodie has three
Throat-Guards working for you, protecting your throat as no
other smoke can. They reduce tars and make smoke cooler.
And just hold that Kaywoo die! Feel the satin-smooth
briar. It's the world's best. Admire it as you would the finest
piece of sculpture.
And what a real smoke a Kaywoodie gives you...what a
man's smoke! Plus so much extra throat protection!
Kaywoodie imports the finest briar-and then
throws 90% of it away. Keeps only the finest
10%, the very heart, for cool, sweet sroking.
NEW YO RK LONDON . SINCE 1851

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SPECIAL RATES

for

Christmas Vacation Travel
via New York Central

New York
Albany
Boston
Rochester

Reg Fare
$48.01
41.17
56.90
27.70
21.68
1915

Holiday Fare
$38.00
33.00
48.00
23.00
18.00
15.50

You Save
$10.01
8.17
8.90
4.70
3.68
3.65

_d ,~

L

WHENEVER SHEEDY gave a gal the glad ham she turned up
her snoot. Poor Paul took pen and oink and wrote a litter
home: "I'm sty-mied. All the gals think I'm a boar. To get
at a fe at!" H ins? m i..ther wroe hack. "Fven a dull.

Buffalo
Ch irainc

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