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November 25, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-25

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U.

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.,...

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1951

Cal

Upends Stanford;

Tennessee

Blanks

Kentucky

Johnson, LeClaire Lead
Wolverines to Upset Win

(Continued from Page 1)
Ohio's front line played mag-
nificently, too, turning back the
winners on one occasion when
they had a first and goal-to-go in-
side the six yard line in the first
quarter. Defensive left end Sher-
win Gandee was a standout for
the Bucks.
* * *
THAT FIRST quarter threat de-
veloped after Michigan recovered
a fumble by Ohio halfback Vic
Janowicz on the Wolverine 42.
From that point the offense began
to roll smoothly with Peterson
picking up consistent gains and
flanker Fred Pickard hauling in
a pair of left-handed passes from
Topor.
Pickard fumbled the last one
but Wes Bradiford was alert and
covered it on the enemy 11.
Fromthere Peterson plunged to
a first down on the six, but two
running plays failed and George
Rosso intercepted a Topor pass
on the four yard line to end the
thrust.
Ohio's most serious bid for a
touchdown developed with about
12 minutes left to play in the third
period when Johnson was injured
and removed from the lineup.
THE BUCKEYES took over on
their own 22 and quarterback Tony
Curcillo opened up with an 11
yard completed pass to end Ray
Hamilton. Janowicz and Walt
Klevayadded14before Curcillo
connected with Hamilton again
for 16 yards and a first down on
the Michigan 37.
Janowicz and fullback Jack
Wagner collaborated for an-
other first down on the 24, but
two plays later Buckeye chances
went up in smoke when end Bob
Josihn caught a Curcillo pass
only to lose it at the 19 where
Roger Zatkoff recovered for the
Wolverines.
Neither team was able to hold
the ball for, long. That fact was
emphasized as statistics revealed
that possession alternated 16 times
in each half. There were 19 punts.
* * *
BOTH OFFENSIVE platoons

lost the ball six times on fumbles
and interceptions, but Michigan
converted every crucial break to
its advantage.
The game was played evenly
in everydepartment. Ohio had
a slight edge in total offense
with 222 yards to Michigan's
215, but most of the Buckeye
gains came in their own terri-
tory.

The statistics:
First Downs
Rushing Yardage
Passing Yardage
Passes Attempted
Passes Completed
Passes Intercepted
Punts
Punting Average
Fumbles Lost
Yards Penalized
Ohio State 0
Michigan 0
Michigan Scoring:

O.S.
14
120
102
26
9
2
9
27
4
15
00
7 0

MICH.
14
135
80
29
12
4
.10
32
2
55
0-0
0-7

Bowl-Bound
Vols Score
Four Times
LEXINGTON-(I)-Hank Laur-
icella, a half back with a naughty
wiggle to his hips, and awesome
blocking made a Tennessee waltz
of the annual football game with
Kentucky yesterday, 28 to 0.
The Tennessee star ran, passed
and kicked as the Nation's No. 1
team, already designated to play
in the Sugar Bowl game against
Maryland, kept alive its domina-
tion over the Kentuckians, who
are booked for the Cotton Bowl
come Jan. 1. The Blue Grass team
now has tried in vain since 1935 for
a victory over its arch rival.
Lauricella was the big gun for
Tennessee although he didn't score.
He receivedaable aid from such
other backs as Bert Rechichar,
Andy Kozar, and Bill Arbish, a de-
fensive halfback, who twice swip-
ed Kentucky passes.
Tennessee, brilliantly methodi-
cal, pounded to touchdowns in
each period while Kentucky made
only two serious threats. One died
on the 14-yard line and the other
on the one-foot line.
SPORTS
BOB LANDOWNE
Night Editor
Final
Big 'Ten
Stanings

Golden Bears Stop Win
Streak of Indians, 20-7

Touchdown,

Peterson. Conversion, Rescorla.
LINEUPS
MICHIGAN Pos. OHIO STATE

Perry LE
Johnson LT
Kinyon LG
O'Shaughnessy C
Wolter RG
Stribe RT
Pickard RE
Topor Q B
Putich LH
Bradford RH
Peterson FB
Michigan substiti

Hamilton
Krisher
Takacs
Merrell
Reichenbach
Endres
Joslin
t Curcillo
Janowicz
Klevay
Wagner
tutions: Ends

-Daily-Roger Reinke
UP IN THE AIR-Ted Topor sails to the turf after getting his feet knocked from under him by an
unidentified OSU defender. Topor had gone back to pass but was forced to run with the ball when
all of his receivers were covered.
ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL:
Y
06sterbaan Proud of 1951 Wolverines

PALO ALTO-T)-,Spearheaded
by Johnny Pappa, a sub halfback,
California's Bears smashed and
powered their way to a 20-7 up-
set victory over Stanford's Indians
yesterday to hand the prospective
Rose Bowl team its first defeat of
the season.
An overflow crowd of more than
90,000 saw Pappa race 21 yards
in the second period for one Cali-
fornia touchdown and crack the
Stanford line for the last three
yards in the final quarter for an-
other.
* * *
LEFT HALFBACK Don Robison
put the Bears into the lead in the
opening quarter with a 34-yard
touchdown run right through the
center of the Stanford team.
Stanford, after being stopped
twice on scoring TD's, put to-
gether a touchdown march late
in the final quarter. It was a
matter of being too late with
too little. California had the
54th "big game" in the bag.
Stanford and their rookie coach,
HawUVks Stop
.Detroit, 6,2,
T o End Jinx
DETROIT-(/P)-Inspired by the
return of defenseman Jack Stew-
art, the Chicago Black Hawks
blasted the Detroit Red Wings 6-2
here last night before 12,404
stunned National Hockey League
fans.
It ended a Detroit jinx that had
extended over the Black Hawks
for the last 12 straight games. It
also was the first defeat for the
league-leading Red Wings in their
last 11 starts.
* * *
STEWART HAS been sidelined
with injuries and was playing in
his first game in weeks. He suf-
fered a concussion early in the
season and recently had been
skating back into condition at the
Hawks' Galt, Ont., farm.
Detroit fans, accustomed to
strong Red Wing comebacks, set-
tled back to wait a scoring rush.
But it came only briefly. Ted
Lindsay rapped in a goal while
Chicago was shorthanded to make
it 2-1.
Maple Leafs Win
TORONTO-A'P)-The Toronto
Maple Leafs downed their arch ri-
vals, the Montreal Canadiens, 4-2,
last night with Ted Kennedy and
rookie Bob Sollinger scoring the
deciding markers in the third per-
iod.
The triumph enabled the Leafs
to advance to within five points of
the National Hockey League's;
pace-setting Detroit Red Wings.

Chuck Taylor, had racked up nine
consecutive wins before they went
up against their traditional rival.
They were 13 points favorites to.
go through for a perfect record.
But California came up with one
of its finest games. The Bears4
traveled 86 yards to score after
taking the6opening kickoff. They
went 51 yards on a march starting
late in the initial period and end-
ing early in the second for their x'
second touchdown. Both scoring
drives were completed on ground
plays and sheer power.
SOphladen
UCLA rTris
USC, 21-7
LOS ANGELES - (R) - Led by
two hard-hitting sophomose half-
backs and a brilliant display of
defense, UCLA blocked and rocked,
favored Southern California into
submission by a 21-7 score yes-
terday and walked off the memor-
ial coliseum turf with the juiciest
victory plum of the season.
Blasting out touchdowns in the
first, third and fourth quarters,
the underestimated Bruins earned
runner up title laurels in the Pa-
cific Coast Conference with the
triumph over the crosstown neigh-
bors.
THE SOPHOMORE pair, Paul
Cameron and Don Stalwick, were
the bigguns of the UCLA attack,
while the outweighed UCLA de-
fensive line held the vaunted Tro-
jans well in check until late in
the final quarter.
UCLA thus wound up the sea-
son with a record of five wins,
three defeats and one tie. The
lone Bruin conference loss was
to Stanford.
The defeat was the second for
the USC varsity-to go with an
earlier setbacks by Stanford-and
the Trojans have one game left,
the annual encounter here next
Saturday with Notre Dame.
*+*s

;-

- Osterman, Dingman, Green,
Stanford; Tackles-Balog, Ben-
nett, Zatkoff, Pederson; Guards
-Timm, Beison, Dugger, Kelsey;
Quarterbacks-Billings, Zanfag-
na; Fullbacks-LeClaire, Res-
corla; Halfbacks-Oldham, How-
ell, Tinkham, Witherspoon.
Ohio State substitutions: Ends
-Gandee, Armstrong, Walther,
Grimes; Tackles-Hietikko, Ja-
coby, Wittman, Logan; Guards
-Smith, Thomas, Ruzich, Fisch-
er, Ronemus; Centers - Heid,
Rath; Quarterbacks - Arledge;
Halfbacks - Bruney, Borton,
Skvarka, Beekley, Goodsell, Ros-
so.

Illinois
Purdue
Wisconsin
MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Northwestern
Minnesota
Indiana
Iowa

W
5
4
5
4
2
2
1
1
0

L
0
1
1
2
2
4
4
5
5

T
1
0
1
0
2
0
0
1

Pct.
.917
.800
.786
.666
.500
.333
.250
.167
.083

ORDER NOW
Christmas Cards
WITH YOUR NAME
50 for 1 and up
ULRICH'S BOOK STORE

By JIM PARKER
Associate Sports Editor
Michigan's Bennie Oosterbaan
was one of the proudest men alive
yesterday as he crowded among
the young men who made this
feeling possible-the members of
his 1951 Wolverine football squad.
A big, broad grin was firmly en-
trenched on the genial coach's
face as he moved among players,
congratulating them on their fin-
est performance of the year.
* * *
AND IT WAS typical of the kind
of ball Michigan has played when
it won one this year. The defeats
outnumbered the victories this
season for the first time since
1936, but you never would have
thought that from. the way the
Wolverines have played ball.
They had to go all out every-
time they went out on the field.
They did all that was humanly
possible of them (and sometimes
some of the impossible) and
they did it ina manner to bring
credit to themselves and to
Michigan.
They weren't what you would
call a great team, but they made
up for that in sheer determination.
"These boys just didn't know the
meaning of 'quit," said Ooster-
baan. "I'm proud to have coached
such a squad. They worked hard
and they never gave up, even
when things got going awfully
tough for them. Yes sir, I'm proud
of these boys."

AGAINST THE Buckeyes, Mich-
igan was again the pre-game un-
derdogs. But somebody evidently
forgot to tell the Wolverines that
and they proceeded to deflate OSU
ego from the opening kick off.
"It's the only way to end a
season," said Big Tom Johnson,
one of the nine seniors who end-
ed their Michigan playing ca-
reers in such grand style. John-
son was his usual devastating
self in his last game for the
Maize and Blue, playing a terri-
fic defensive game even after
his knee was injured and had to
be taped up for him to finish
the game.
Another senior, Russ Osterman,
defensivesright end, was high on
his praise for Ohio. "That's a
great team," said Osterman, "one
of the best we've faced all season."
CAPTAIN BILL PUTICH was
sporting a grin almost as big as
Oosterbaan's (mostly because he's
not as big as Oosterbaan). "We
got the one we wanted, we won
the big one," shouted the Cleve-
land senior who didn't seem to
mind at all helping Michigan to
maintain a dominance over his
home staters that stretches back
seven years now. Only a 7-7 tie
in 1949 keeps this from being a
seven game victory streak.
Fullback Don Peterson, who
scored the game's only touch-
down, was as happy as a little

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kid over the outcome of the
game. "Gee whiz, it's a great
feeling isn't it?" But the Buck-
eyes knew they weren't dealing
with a kid when they met Peter-
son coming through the line.
Time after time the spunky Ra-
cine, Wis., senior surged on for
those extra two yards after he
had been hit by two and three
tacklers.
Peterson's fight and determina-
tion made him the leading ground
gainer for both teams. He car-
ried the ball 19 times and gained
70 of Michigan's 135 yards gained
rushing. Putich was a distant
second with 30 yards in 14 tries.
* * *
MR. FOOTBALL, Vic Janowicz,
was the top man for the losers
with 53 of their 120 yards on the
ground. Fullback Jack Wagner
was second with 39 yards on five
attempts for the best average of
the day, 7.8 yards per carry.
In the passing department
Putich was the most consistent
thrower with ten completions in
21 attempts. However, the Buck-
eye's Tony Curcillo outgained
his Michigan rival 80 to 64 yards
on eight completions.
The atmosphere in the Ohio
State dressing room was just like
it had been in Michigan's the
week before - pretty gloomy.
Coach Woody Hayes was kept
pretty busy going around to his
players and consoling them about
the game. "We let you down,
coach," was an oft-spoken com-
ment. But Hayes reassured them
that he didn't feel that way about
it at all.
"WE'RE NOT making any alibis
about the game," spoke the Ohio
coach who had just finished his
first year at the helm of the Buck-
eyes. "Michigan played a great
game. The Wolverines had the
more determined spirit and that
was the difference."
CHRISTMAS WORK
RUSSELL KELLY OFFICE
SERVICE, DETROIT
is hiring women
for Christmas vacation work.
Typists, stenos, clerks
in Detroit
watch D. 0. B.
Contact Office of
Appointments.

THE BRUINS, with their crip-
pled coach, Red Sanders, hobbling
along the sidelines, struck first
when the USC star, Frank Gifford,
fumbled on his own 42, Stalwick
raced 16 yards, and four plays
later from the 24, Cameron passed
to Stalwick in the end zone.
UCLA clung to the 7-0 lead
at halftime.
The Bruins then took control in
the third quarter, sweeping 65
yards to another score. Stalwick,
a 170-pounder, reeled off a 46 yard
run on the ancient statue of lib-
erty play to put the ball on the
USC 22. Then Ike Jones, an end,
on fourth down came around on
a double *verse to sweep to a
touchdown standing up.

I

IU

Kazmater Hurt As Tigers
Win;_Harvard, Yale Tie

It

i

Casual...
but Correct!

I

PRINCETON --(I)-- Dick Kaz-
maier, Princeton's dazzling All-
American back, sustained a mild
concussion in the second period
against Dartmouth yesterday and
was ordered by his physician to
leave the game-the last of his
collegiate career.
CHRISTMAS
CARDS
Complete Assortment
i OVERBECK
R BOOKSTORE

The injury came as he threw a
14-yard pass that advanced the
ball within two and one half yards
of the goal to set up Princeton's
first touchdown in the second per-
iod.
* * *
KAZMAIER was able to walk to
the dressing room, but players said
he could remember nothing of the
game. Rather than take any
chances he was benched.
But later, examination reveal-
ed that he had fractured his
nose. He returned to play a few
minutes at the end of the game
with the aid of a special mask.
Princeton won the game, 13-0.
NEW HAVEN -WP) -Yale and
Harvard, once mighty football
powers, turned in a thrilling battle
yesterday which ended in a 21-21
tie amid as exciting a finish as
these ivy festooned rivals have ever
staged.
It was the first tie in this ancient
series, which began in 1875, in 26
years and had the crowd of 41,000
yelling wildly at the final gun.
Yale, which had led until the
final five minutes, rallied to knot
the game with only 61 seconds
to go.

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