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November 25, 1951 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1951-11-25

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2;f; 1951

TH IHGA AL

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23 1951

r

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
California Regents Revoke
Loyalty Oath Requirement

LIT SCHOOL CONFAB:
Student-Faculty Relations To Be Topic

CLASSIIEDS

By HARLAI*D BRITZ
The University of California's
loyalty oath is no more.
The Board of Regents of the
multi-campus school has voted not
to reconsider the two year old re-
quirement for university employ-
ment which has caused such con-
troversy.
THE 12-5 VOTE completely kills
any chance of the oath being rein-
stituted.
One of the chief reasons be-
lieved critical in the Regents'
decision was that all University
employes would be required to
sign the standard State Loyalty
Campus
Calendar
Events Today
TV HOUR-Native dances by
University foreign students will be
featured on the television hour at
1 p.m. today over WWJ-TV, Chan-
nel 4.
Coming Events
MUSIC ENSEMBLE-Sponsored
by the Music School, the early
Music Ensemble of the University
of Minnesota, Duluth Branch, will
present a concert featuring music
of the .middle ages, renaissance
and early baroque, at 4:15 p.m.
tomorrow in Rackham Assembly
Hall.
SYMPHONY-Featuring Theo-
dore Johnson, grad., as violin so-
loist, the University Symphony
Orchestra, conducted by Wayne
Dunlap, wil present its annual fall
concert at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Hill Auditorium.
QUALITY CONTROL - Prof.
Ellis R. Ott of Rutgers University
will speak on "Basic Concepts of
Quality Control" at the Michigan
Society for Quality Control meet-
ing at 8 p.n. Tuesday in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
EXHIBITION-The loan exhi-
bition, "Italian, Spanish a n d
French Paintings of the 17th and
18th Centuries" will continue on
display at the University Museum
of Art through Wednesday.
* * *.
CONCERT - Salvatore Bacca--
loni, bass, will include composi-
tions by Gounod, Mozart, Verdi,
Schubert, Beethoven and Mous-1
sorgsky in a concert at 8:30 p.m.,
Thursday in Hill Auditorium.

Oath even if the university did-
n't have a similar requirement.
Eighteen faculty members had
been fired as a result of the oath
but their immediate rehiring is ex-
pected.

ON THE lighter side, federal in-
vestigators found reports correct
that Harvard students were manu-
facturing their own liquor in pri-
vate stills.
The investigation came after
an expose in the Harvard Crim-
son, student newspaper.
One student, who has been
brewing 170 proof liquor since
early last spring, admitted that the
investigator smashed his still so
that it was incapable of further
use.
* * *
HE EXPLAINED that the rea-
sons for his operations were "fun
and low cost." He claimed that it
cost only 25 cents to brew a quart
of liquor twice as powerful as a
five dollar quart of commercial
'stuff
Back in the midwest, University
of Illinois trustees have requested
Dr. Andrew C. Ivy to intensify his
clinical tests on the effects of the
controversial cancer drug, krebio-
zen.
Dr. Ivy had been suspended by
the Chicago Medical Society for
unethically promoting the drug.
Fans Treated
To Win,_Sun
(Continued from Page 1)
rooters. The tricky beguine step
was executed by the bandsmen
with the precision of the Radio
City Rockettes.
Undoubtedly the person best in
control of his outward emotions
during the game yesterday was
coach Bennie Oosterbaan. He
never cracked a smile as the Maise
and Blue scored, made first downs
and intercepted passes.
* * *
HOWEVER, with 15 seconds to
go and Michigan in possession of
the ball, Oosterbaan broke into a
smile.
Immediately following the game,
seven. trains pulled out for the
state of Ohio. Prominently miss-
ing was the familiar strain, "I
Don't Give a Damn for the Whole
State of Michigan."
On the more serious side, Ernest
E. Wemp, 70 years old, of Detroit
suffered from a heart attack at
the game. He was taken to St.
Joseph Hospital where he died an
hour later.

By JERRY HELMAN
"How Can Student Faculty Re-
lationships be Improved" will be
the topic of the second literary
college conference of the semester
to be held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Rm. 3G of the Union.
Students, faculty and adminis-
trators will have an opportunity
to get together and discuss the
significant aspects of the prob-
lem, such as how a large college
can be made to seem more per-
sonable and what can be done to
get students in larger lecture sec-
tions in closer contact with their
professors.
* * *
ASSISTANT DEAN James Ro-
bertson of the literary college and
"guiding light" of the conferences,
points out that "in the literary

college, the feeling of bigness is
most prevalent among freshmen.
Sophomores and upperclassmen
learn to adjust to this coldness.
"But this does not mean that
the problem is not a great one
since good, warm student-fa-
culty relations help the student
to learn and faculty members to
teach better," Robertson noted.
Among the faculty members
that have been invited to attend
the get-together are Prof. Hay-
ward Keniston of the Spanish de-
partment, Prof. William Willcox
of the history department and
Prof. Roger Heyns of the psychol-
ogy department and recipient last
year of an award for being the best
teacher in the literary college.
* * *
THE DISCUSSION will be in-

formal, and the conferences work
in a unique way to bring about
changes, according to Robertson.
No resolutions are passed and the
conference does not go on record
as advocating any particular rb-
form.
"These conferences enable the
administration to judge what can
be done and how best to do it and
it gives the faculty an insight in-
to what students are thinking
about."
After the conference, a com-
mittee is organized from among
students present to draw up the
results of the meeting into a re-
port, which is then presented to
the college.
All interested students are in-
vited to attend and take part in
the discussion.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Lady's gold Bulova watch with
gold stretch band. Reward. Call Rita
Levine, 399 Jordan. )58L
FOR SALE
BABY PARAKEETS or budgies, canaries,
bird supplies and cages. Open 1 to 7
p.m. 562 S. Seventh St. Phone 5330.
STAMP COLLECTION-U.S. and for-
eign. Around 50% of Scott and Less.
Call Ann Arbor 9455 and ask for Mr.
Dishneau. )82
BOMBER JACKETS $9.95. Satin twill,
quilt lining, water repellent. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington.)3
TWO FORMALS-One white, one yellow.
Size 10, worne once. Call 5617 after 4
o'clock. )81
ROOMS FOR RENT
STUDENT to share apartment with
Grad. students. Modern kitchen, gas
heat, continu.lous hot water. Student
landlord. Call 3-1791 before 10:30 a.m.
27R
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R

FOR RENT

ROOMS & SUITES FOR MEN-For those'
who'll appreciate congenial landlady.
On campus. Call before 4 p.m. 2-0542.
)11F
ATTRACTIVE four-room suite for 3-5
men. 1402 Hill. Call after 5:30 p.m.
)lR
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens --
Sales, rentals, and service. M rrill's,
314 S. State St. )3B
TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
als at Office Equipment Co. 215 E.
Liberty. )4B
EXPERT TYPING. Reasonable rates. 329
S. Main. Phone 3-4133 or 29092 eve-
nings. )8B
TYPING (experienced) - Theses, term
papers, stencils. Phone 7590, 830 S.
Main. )6B
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
APPLICATION PHOTOGRAPHS-4 for
$1 while you wait. Snider Studio, 213
S. Main (opposite Woolworth's). )19B

PERSONAL
MODERN Beauty Shop - Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ma-
chineless or cold wave, $5.00. shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1 00. Hair-
cut $1.00. Phone 8100. )13P
THE BEST in Diamond Engagement
and Wedding Rings at wholesale
prices. Ph. 2-1809 evenings. L. E.
Anger, )15P
HELP WANTED
MUST BE EXPERIENCED -- Women's
better apparel and ready-to-wear. Ex-
cellent conditions, top earnings, steady
or part time. Hospitalization, paid
vacations. Reply Box 2, Mich. Daily
or phone S. Davis, Detroit, WA 8-9821.
)24H
GROUP WORKER - Some secretarial
ability. Interesting work with student
group. Hillel Foundation. Ph. 3-4129
Monday. )33H
YOUNG LADY WANTED to help during
Christmas rush. Part or full time
selling and stock work. Apply at Fol-
lett's Book Store, 322 South State
Street. 75H

-l

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
2552 Administration Building before
3 p.m. the day preceding publication
(11 a.m. on Saturday)."
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1951
VOL. LXIV, No. 53
Notices
Inauguration of President Hatcher, 3
p.m., Tues., Nov. 27. Hill Auditorium.
The University cordially invites both
the general public and the student body
to attend this ceremony, up to the
capacity of Hill Auditorium. Tickets of
admission will be available for distri-
bution at the Information Desk, first
floor lobby of the Administration Build-_
ing, from Tues., Nov. 20. 1,000 have
been specially reserved for university
students. Those who attend are re-
quested to be seated before 2:45 p.m.
The doors of the Auditorium will be
open at 2 p.m.
Members of the faculty are invited to
join the academic procession, assemb-
ling in Rooms 2054 and 2082 Natural
Science Building at 2:15 p.m. Academic
costume will be worn.
Members of the faculty and others
who are acting as delegates of educa-
tional institutions and societies should
register Monday afternoon or evening,
Nov. 26, or Tuesday morning, Nov. 27, at
the Inauguration Committee's desk in
the Michigan Union lobby.
While University offices will not be
officially closed on the afternoon of
Nov. 27, members of the non-academic
staff whose duties will permit will be
excused at 2 p.m. to attend the in-
auguration.
The University community 'and the
public in general are invited to attend
the reception for Dr. and Mrs. Hatcher
which will take place at the Michigan
League immediately after the inaugu-
ration ceremonies. Please use the door
at the extreme north end of the build-
ing.

the Bureau of Ordnance, of Silver
Spring, Maryland, will be interviewing
together on a coordinated recruiting
program for the following people: Feb-
ruary, June, and August graduates of
Engineering, particularly Mechanical,
Electrical, Industrial, and Electronic,
and also Physicists. These positions are
for Research, Development, and Pro-
duction, and open to those with BS,
MS, and PhD degrees. A group meeting
will be held on Mon., Nov. 26, at 5 p.m.,
in room 4051, Administration Building.
Wed., Nov. 28, a representative of
Herpolsheimer's of Grand Rapids, Atich-
igan, will be Interviewing women grad-
uates in February and June, and in-
terested in merchandising, for an ex-
ecutive trainee program.
Thurs., Nov. 29, a representative of
the Marathon Corporation, of Menasha,
Wisconsin, will be interviewing Febru-
ary and June graduates for the follow-
ing positions: Sales, Accounting; Per-
sonnel; Engineering (BS in Mechanical
Engineering, Chemical Engineering,
Civil Engineering), and Research (MS
or PhD in Chemical Engineering, Chem-
istry), Manufacturing (combination of
Mathematics and Accounting for Pro-
duction Control and Materials Hand-
ling).
Thurs., Nov. 29, a representative of
the A. O. Smith Corporation of Mil-
waukee, Wisconsin, will be interviewing
February Business Administration grad-
uates for Accounting positions.
Fri., Nov. 30, representatives of the
Russell Kelly Office Service will be in-
terviewing women for Christmas vaca-
tion work in Detroit. Positions open
will be Typing, Stenography, Clerical,
Filing, etc.
Fri., Nov. 30, a representative of the
Young Women's Christian Association
of New York will be interviewing exper-
ienced persons, preferably between 25
and 40, for program directors of teen-
age and young adult groups, and for
executive directors cf college and uni-
versity Associations. Experience may
be in terms of teaching, social group
work, recreation work, religious educa-
tion, administration and community
organization. They will also be inter-
viewing inexperienced personnel with
majors in health and physical educa-
tion for health and physical education
positions.
Thurs. and Fri., Nov. 29 and 30, and
Mon. and Tues., Dec. 3 and 4, repre-
sentatives of the United States Civil
Service for the California Naval Re-
search Laboratories will be interview-
ing February graduates of the follow-
ing for positions in Research, Produc-
tion, and Development: all levels in
Electronics, Electrical, Aeronautical, and
Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Ma-
thematics and Statistics, and BS in'
Civil and Chemical Engineering. ThisĀ°
includes all the research laboratories
from San Diego to San Francisco.
Fri., Nov. 30, a representative of the
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurancej
Company of Grand Rapids, Michigan,
will be interviewing February, June,
and August graduates with the follow-
ing degrees for positions as Life Under-1
writers: BA, BS, Business Administra-
tion, or Law Degree. These positions will
be located in cities in the western side
of Michigan.

versity of Minnesota under the direc-
tion of Albert G. Hess, will present a
program at 4:15 Monday afternoon, No-
vember 26, in the Rackham Assembly
Hall. The group, with replicas of an-
cient instruments, will play composi-
tions by composers of the 13, 14, 15 &
16 centuries, when the harpsichord, re-
corder, hurdy-guidy, cornetto, cisther,
tromba marina, and violin were the
principal instruments used to perform
music. The program will be open to
the public.
University of Michigan Symphony
Orchestra, Wayne Dunlap, conductor,
will present a concert at 8:30 Tues.,
Nov. 27, Hill Auditorium. The program
will open with Rossini's Overture to
"Semiramide," followed by Beethoven's
Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major, Op.
60. After intermission Theodore John-
son, graduate student of violin, will ap-
pear as soloist with the orchestra play-
ing Lao's Symphonie Espagnole, Op.
21. Aaron Copland's El Salon Mexico
will close the concert. The public will
be admitted without charge.
Events Today
Canterbury Club: Prof. Frank Hunt-
ley, of the Department of English, will
address members of Canterbury Club at
their regular meeting, 5:30 p.m. This
will be followed by supper and choral
evening worship in the Church.
Roger Williams Guild: Meeting at
5:30 at the Guild House to go to the
Canterbury Club for supper and meet-
ing.
Lutheran Student Association: Stu-
dent Center, Hill and Forest. Supper,
5:30 p.m. Program, 7: Film: "Turn in
the Road."
Congregational-Disciples Guild: 6
p.m. supper and 6:45 program at Me-
morial Christian Church, Hill and Tap-
pan. Prof. Preston Slosson will speak
on "The Revolt Against Colonialism."
Town and Country Club. Members
and friends going on the Saginaw For-
est hike meet at WAB at 2 p.m. Bring
your own food.
Hot Record Society. A program of
New York Dixieland, 8 p.m., League.
Everyone invited.
Graduate Outing Club: Meet at the
rear of the Rackham Building 2 p.m.
Bowling and Hiking.
Coming Eveiits
Sociedad Hispanica. Executive meet-
ing, Mon., Nov. 26, 405 Romance Langu-
age, 3:45 p.m. All interested students
invited.
Michigan Society for Quality Control:
Tues., Nov. 27, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theater. Prof. Ellis R. Ott, of Rutgers
University, will speak on "Basic Con-
cepts of Quality Control Illustrated
with Geometrical Methods and Gad-
gets." All interested are invited.
Graduate History Club: Tues., Nov.
27, 8 p.m., East Conference Room, Rack-
ham Bldg. Prof. Meisel will speak on
"Changing Concepts in Marxism." Re-
freshments.
Electronics Group Meeting, AIEE,
Tues., Nov. 27, 8 p.m. 1400 New Chem-
istry Bldg. Dr. Henry J. Gomberg will
speak on "Radioactive Tracer Techni-
ques in Engineering."
La p'tite causette meets Monday from
(Continued on Page 4)

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