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November 22, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

M

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1951

_. _. I

FROM FLYING TO HISTORY:
Kamikaze Pilot Becomes 'U' Student'

* " * *

By CRAWFORD YOUNG
Less than seven short years ago,
Yukihisa Suzuki was a member of
the Imperial Japanese "Kamikaze"
Corps.
C And now the former pilot with a
historical flair is in his second
year at the University, dedicating
himself to a study of Japanese-
American relations-whose disrup-
tion almost brought his life to a
premature close.
It was only a timely attack of
bronchitis, followed by a few well-
placed American bombs, that Su-
zuki managed to miss a "suicide
mission." In early 1945, the des-
perate Japanese government de-
cided to turn their entire Air Fleet
of 3,000 planes into one mass
Kamikaze.
SUZUKI, WHO had served in
the Japanese Naval Air Corps, was
shifted in December, 1943 to an air
base near Tokyo, where groups of
doomed pilots waited.
The airmen, confused and de-
moralized, but hoping somehow
to survive the war, awaited the
fateful telegram from Tokyo
which would sentence them to
an involuntary heroism. Occa-
sional practice flights in the old,
rickety planes broke the mono-
tony.
But at an opportune moment in
his training program, Suzuki fell
ill-and lost some of the flying
time needed for a Kamikaze as-
signment. Before he was ready to
fly, American bombs virtually de-
stroyed the Kamikaze air fleet.
* * *
SUZUKI RECALLED that when
the time came for a group of sui-
cide pilots to make their supreme
sacrifice on the alter of patriotism,
there was a period of "celebration"

But more important, he came
out of the war with a desire to
write, to transcribe his experi-
ences as a Kamikaze pilot. With
the English he had picked up
in his college days, he set about
putting his story on paper.
Meanwhile, he got a job with
the historical division of the Su-
preme Allied Headquarters in Tok-
yo. There he met Louis Doll, a Uni-
versity graduate and now a profes-
sor at Bay City Junior College.
Doll became his benefactor, and
helped Suzuki com eto this coun-
try in the summer of 1950.
x *

YUKIHISA
.. former Kamikaze

i fALTHOUGH SUZUKI had stu-
died at two Japanese universities
Sforfive years, the University only
allowed him fifteen hours of trans-
fer credits. This leaves him a 27-
year-old sophomore.
The onetime pilot, with the help
of a childhood friend at the Am-
erican embassy in Tokyo who now
lives in New York, interested Blue-
book magazine in his story re-
cently. It will be printed in three
installments in .the December,
January, and February issues. De-
cember Bluebook will go on sale
--Daily-Malcolm Shatz tomorrow.
A SUZUKI mrw.
k SUZUKIs rTo follow up his first literary
pilot writes his story venture, Suzuki is now working on
* * * a more ambitious project-a 700
ironically enough, ornamental page study analyzing the back-
green parachutes. ground and psychology which led
Then they took off. j the Japanese to war.
s Writing, Suzuki hopes, will con-
SUZUKI FOUND himself still tinue to be an important sideline
alive physically after the war end- for him. Upon his graduation in
ed, but shared the mental de- 1954, he plans to return to his na-
pression which gripped all Japan. tive Japan, probably to teach and
It was commonly believed that the further investigate the develop-
Americans would shoot all Kami- ment and promotion of Japanese-
kaze pilots. American relations.

SL To Seek
Free Grid
Programs
The ten-cent program issue will
again go before the Board in Con-
trol of Intercollegiate Athletics to-
morrow.
The Student Legislature will re-
quest the Board to publish a small,
inexpensive football program for
free distribution to all students at
each home football game.
ANTICIPATING resistance on
financial grounds, SL will offer
to help foot the bill of these pro-
grams. According to cabinet mem-
ber-at-large Phil Berry, the total
bill for 16,000 programs per game
for a season could be as low as
$500.
Since -the controversial ten-
cent programs were banned from
University property last year,
SL has been pressing the Board
for a permanent settlement.
Last year, the Legislature was
permitted to supervise the sale of
the cardboard ten-cent programs.]
But this year, unlicensed vendors
on University property were ar-
rested by the Ann Arbor police.
* * *
AS A COMPROMISE, the ath-
letic department this year issued
folders at registration giving line-
ups for the whole season. However,
SL contends this was ineffective.'
Bob Perry, '53, student repre-
sentative on the Board, expressed
confidence that any proposal, if
a promise of financial cooperation
were included, would have a goodj
chance before the Board.

-Daily-Larry Bestmann
ROUTED RODENT-Frustrated number 58 receives therapy from the guiding hand of the research
assistant.

* * *

* * *

* * *

Frustrated Rat Shows Leftist Trend

a, _ __

* * ,

<">

fbr the chosen. Emotion and na-
tionalism were well-lubricated
with quantities of sake, Japanese
rice-wine, while the flyers ate a
final ceremonial meal.
Exhorted by their superiors,
salved with sonorous praises for
the contribution to the country
they were making, the pilots
donned new flight suits with a
rising sun on the back-and

j

Ann Arbor Vicinity Named
Site for New Reformatory
The outskirts of Ann Arbor have been chosen as the probable
site for a new reformatory for young offenders, State Corrections,
Commissioner Ernest C. Brooks revealed yesterday.
Tentative plans call for a cottage-and-dormitory type institution.
It will house 500 to 600 first offenders from 14 to 21 years old.
* * *#
THE ANN ARBOR AREA was chosen for the new reformatory
because of the medical and psychiatric facilities of the University.
Serving to relieve the pressure on present overcrowded state pri-

THANKSGIVING
Program of
T h7 e speech department will
serve up a Thanksgiving special
at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow at
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
with its first laboratory bill of
plays this year.
Featuring works of three distin-
guished playrights, the entire bill
will be directed and staged by stu-
dents in the advanced theatre
courses.

SPECIAL:

One-Acts To Open Today
* * * *

By GAYLE GREENE
Number 58 is frustrated.
Number 58 is a small tan rat,
bred at the University, whose one
purpose in life seems to be knock-
ing his head against the wall of a
large black machine.
"What we are trying to do," the
research assistant said as he plac-
ed number 58 on a small wooden
platform, "is to find some effective
means of therapy that will elimin-
ate the senseless behavior of this
frustrated creature."
* *
FROM HIS perch on the wooden
platform the frustrated rat Is
face to face with the tool of his
frustration-the Lashley jumping
apparatus.
Within the rat's vision are two
windows which the experimenter,
Paul Ellen, research assistant, has
covered with contrasting card-
board cards-one painted white
with a black circle in the center
and the other painted black with
a white circle.
These cards can be locked se-
Union Plans Trip
To 'Oklahoma'
. Students will have an oppor-
tunity.to see the all-time hit musi-
cal "Oaklahoma," Friday, Nov.
30 when the Union will make its
third theatre trip of the season
to Detroit.
Tickets at $3.90, which includes
a seat at the show and round trip
bus fare, will be on sale between
3 and 5 p.m. Monday through
Thursday next week in the Union
lobby ticket booth.
CHRISTMAS
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CURRIER & IVES
RUST CRAFT ETCHCRAFT
FOUNTAIN PENS
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curely or left free so that the
rat may easily knock them out
of place and gain access to a
dish of food.
If the rat jumps against a lock-
ed window, however, he falls down
upon a, piece of tarpaulin stretch-
ed across a frame a few inches
from the floor.
"BECAUSE OF HIS frustration,,
number 58 always jumps to the
left," Ellen said. "Whenever I
place the card with q white circle
on the left I leave the window un-
locked and the rat jumps unhesi-
tantly through the window to a
dish of food. See," he said, tapping
58 on the tail, "he jumps to the
left."
"Now, however, when I switch
the black circle to the left, watch
his behavior. He knows that the
black circle is always locked." Al-
though 58 hesitated warily, he fin-
ally jumped-again, to the left.
"His fixation simply won't al-
low him to jump to the right,
even if I leave the right window
completely uncovered and place
a dish of food inside where he
can see it," Ellen explained.
"This rat is only one of 80 em-
ployed in our research which Prof.
Norman R. F. Maier of.the psy-
chology department is directing,"
Ellen said. "We know that frus-
trated animals can't express their
learning and we are trying to find
ways to break the fixed response
which is a result of their frustra-
tion."
* * #
"NUMBER 59 IS my pet," he
said, picking up a dark colored rat
with a patch of auburn fur. "She
always jumps to the right. During
our experiment, however, rather
than jump to the right and in-

variably hit her head against a
locked window she has been jump-
ing to the table placed about a
foot to the right of the apparatus
-still to the right," he pointed
out.
"Since we have been applying
therapy, guiding her by force to
jump to the opposite side, she is
beginning to jump toward the
windows again, and very gradually
is losing her fixated response," he
said placing the object of his com-
ments on the jumping platform.
This guidance orforcing method
seems to be the only successful
therapy we have found, Ellen com-
mented. However we are also try-
ing punishment and reward thera-
py as a method of varying the rat's
response.
In the meantime plump, seem-
ingly healthy, but actually frus-
trated young rats will continue to
give vent to their frustration.

*

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Featuring Genuine
ITALIAN
SPAGHETTI
and RAVIOLI
with
Salad, Rolls, Coffee
Also
SANDWICHES and
SHORT-ORDERS

sons, the reformatory will not be<
as restrictive as Jackson prison.
Brooks said that he will ask the
1952 legislature to appropriate
$5,000,000 for the institution. The
request was filed with the state
budget office. It will then be up to
that office to decide if it should
be placed on the budget submitted
to the legislature.
About one fourth of the total
Michigan prison population is

i.7.fy{u .y, tiJ,:,'.r: :.:{"!: i.:.nY: ._' ,A:tq
is (t"
t

composed of 14 to 21 year olds
serving first offense terms, Brooks
added.
"We don't need any more insti-
tutions in Ann Arbor," commented
one University student upon hear-
ing the news.
A graduate student refused to
comment. "I'm prejudiced," he
said, "because I spent three years
in a reformatory."
WASTE
TIME!
SH,
D IT
ST
:RVICE . 22c APIECE

GEORGE BERNARD Shaw's sa-
tiric comedy, "Passion, Poison and
Petrifaction" is a 19th century
type melodramatic farce, a take-
off on the melodrama's of Shaw's
time.
Appropriate intrigue and con-
flict is provided by a jealous hus-
band, a Beau Brummel type lover,
a fickle young wife and a revenge-
ful poisoning.
Tennessee Williams' lyrical
fantasy, "The Case of the
Crushed Petunias" is also on the
bill. Its setting is Miss Simple's
Notion Shop in Primanproper,
Mass. Under the direction of
Catole E. Eiserman, '52, the
play stars Charlotte Matthews,
'52, and William Broeckner, '53.
"Santa Claus" by E. E. Cum-
mings is an expressionistic play
dealing with modern morality.
Cummings has represented the
better nature of man in the title
character who is duped by Death
and told to become a scientist.
Santa's conversion leads to hate,
a chase and a killing with an un-
usual switch in which he gets the
best of death in a triumph of
good over evil.
Tickets for the program of one-"
acts will be on sale today from
5 to 8 p.m. and tomorrow from 10
a.m. to 8 p.m.

DOMESTIC and IMPORTED
INDIA ART SHOP
330 MAYNARD STREET

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-Daily-Bruce Knoll
"NO, I'D RATHER DIE"-Only large quantities of lime will save
the life of her poisoned lover, but Shaw's heroine pleads :with
Adolph in vain to partake of the substance.

-

_l

75c

DROP IT OFF.
P.S.--SPECIAL SHIRT SE

Units To Sponsor
Bloodmobile Here
The combined ROTC units of
the University and the Volunteer
Air Reserve Training Unit of Ann
Arbor will sponsor a Red Cross
Bloodmobile unit from 3-9 p.m.
Wednesday in Rm. 12 of North
Hall.
All personnel associated with
these groups will participate in
the blood donor drive.

510 East Williams

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