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November 21, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-21

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1951

PAGE SIX WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 195!

I

RAMA TALENT SOUGHT:
Wson-son T t
WUMOffers Training in Radio Work Men To Get

HASTENS RECOVERY:
Therapy Gives Convalescents Hope

il I

* * *

* * *

By MIKE SCHERER
High above State Street, in the
ultra-modern studios of Univer-
sity Radio Station WUOM, more
than 100 students and Ann Arbor
residents are receiving training
and experience in radio.
After a long period of inactivity,
the WUOM Radio Guild has been
reorganized into a fuctional group
designed to give students and Ann
Arborites, a chance for training
leading to semi-professional radio
work.
UNDER THE direction of Shir-
ley Loeblich, assistant production
director of WUOM, a class of 106
persons is learning radio and
speech fundamentals, sound-effect
technique and dramatic presenta-
tion.
The ultimate aim of the Guild
is to find and develop new ta-
lent for its regular schedule of
dramatic programs.
"The WUOM Radio Guild is not
connected with the University
speech department, which has its
own radio workshop, nor is it de-
signed to substitute for classroom
work in speech, Miss Loeblich em-
phasized. "Its main function is to
give radio training to those who
otherwise would not have the op-
portunity."
Miss Loeblich is assisted in con-
ducting the Guild course by two
other WUOM staff members,
Frank Bouwsma and Jim Stephen-
son. These three coordinate their
efforts in building a step-by-step
training program.
* * *
THE GUILD program was start-
ed this fall when about 80 tryouts
were auditioned. The ranks were
soon increasd to 106 through
word-of-mouth publicity.
Nearly 85 percent~ of this group
is composed of University stu-
dents from 17 different fields
of concentration, including busi-
ness administration, psychology,
physical education, medicine and
law.
The remaining 15 percent con-
sists of Ann Arbor residents and
students' wives.
THE GROUP has been broken
up into five sections which work
and rehearse separately. Another
section will be formed soon if any
more members are enrolled, ac-
cording to Miss Loeblich.
An organist to accompany dra-
matic shows is currently in great
demand. Miss Loeblich said that
anyone with talent in this line
will be welcomed cordially into
the WUOM studios.
Practice time for Guild members
averages from two to six hours per
week in the studios, plus addi-
tional "homework" a u d y i n g
scripts.
AS THE Radio Guild members
progress in their training, they
will be used on regular WUOM
dramatic programs. Already more
than 20 of the tryouts have been
on live broadcasts.
By January the Radio Guild
Music Confab
To Meet Here
More than 1000 music teachers
from Michigan and the midwest
area will pour into Ann Arbor Nov.
30, through Dec. 2 for the seventh
annual Midwestern Music Con-
ference.
Sponsored by the music school,
the Extension Service and the
Michigan Band and Orchestra As-
sociation, the conference is held
annually at the Univeristy.
The program will include lec-
tures and demonstrations, clinics,
concerts, a workshop and special
sessions.

Featured speakers will include
Edwin Franko Goldman, conduc-
tor of the Goldman Band in New
York, who will talk on "Stylizing
the March," and Paul Christiansen
of the choral division of Concordia
College, Minnesota.

AIM Vote

Independent men not living in
University Residence Halls now
have an opportunity to gain vot-
ing membership in the Association
of Independent Men, AIM Presi-
dent Dave Ponitz, '52, announced
yesterday.
An amendment to the AIM con-
stitution has been passed allow-,
ing unaffiliated male students liv-
ing in unorganized residences to
petition for positions on the AIM
council.
The idea was proposed last year'
by an AIM committee member and
was approved by the council this
fall. Final approval was given re-
cently by the Student Affairs
Committee.

By HELENE SIMON
At first glance the Occupational
Therapy Ward of the University
Hospital looks like a recreational
room, with its record library, looms
and art supplies-but it has a
more significant purpose than di-
version.
To most people, the term "occu-
pational therapy" brings to mind
sick people amusing themselves by
weaving baskets or making rag
rugs. But a trip through the oc-
cupational therapy ward, which is
open to visitors, and a talk with
Elizabeth Clark, director of the
ward, would prove that it plays
an important role in aiding the
convalescent resume a normal
life.
* * *
PATIENTS IN the University
Hospital are given occupational

therapy treatment for two rea-
sons. Those who are expected to
fully recover are given treatment
to keep their joints mobile and
to help them regain their strength.
Patients who are not expected
to return to a completely nor-
mal way of life are taught to do
as much as possible with what
they have and to help them-
selves become fairly independ-
ent.
Everyday actions done practic-
ally automatically, such as using
a comb or buttoning a shirt, may
have to be retaught to persons
who have been struck by polio or
arthritis. Devices have to be con-
stantly developed to enable pa-
tients to perform normal actions.
A piece of material which looks

like a girdle with all the possible
fastenings that might be on
clothes--buttons, hooks, zippers-
helps patients learn again how to
dress themselves.
A boy who can move nothing
but one leg can paint pictures
by a device which connects his
arm with his leg. By moving
his leg, his arm is also moved.
There are no set patterns by
which these mechanisms are made.
Each one must be invented to suit
the needs of a particular patient.
Although people receiving the-
rapy may never perform their
tasks as well as people with no
handicap, they are on their way
toward regaining independence
and self-reliance with the aid of
occupational therapy.

* * *EXCHANGE:
THE MEN who petition will be
interviewed by the AIM cabinet, B
and will become members subject B o fo
to a vote of approval by the present3

MARILYN'S SPORTSWEAR DEPT.
TURTLE NECKS
y BAT-WING SLEEVES

Bolt

WUOM GUILD MEMBERS CONFER WITH DIRECTOR SHIRL
* * * *
.°.N
..

«:.. ~. .... s standing council.
Petitions will be available
from 3 to 5 p.m. on weekdays in
the AIM office, Rm. 3-C, Union.
Petitions must be signed by 25
unaffiliated male students not
living in the dormitories.
In the past, non-represented in-
-Daisy-L, will; dependents have worked with AIM
DEaily-L CETE)council on projects such as the
EY LOEBLICH (CENTER) zoning law changes. At present,
there are two non-voting mem-
I1tz1 ' l M lk bers on the council who live in un-
organized houses.
No definite limit has been set
regarding the number of new
M ightBringmembers who will be accepted on
ore Bacon Council, according to Ponitz.
M ore aconAt the present time the Council
consists of the house presidents
ST. PAUL--(R)-Synthetic milk and AIM representative from each
organized. house on campus, a to-
for pigs, promising more and may- tal of 40 voting members.
be cheaper pork chops and bacon,
was announced last night. The number of new representa-
tives will be limited when the pre-
Newborn piglets can be taken sent members vote on petitioning
from their mothers within 48 students, Ponitz said.
hours and raised entirely ontheI
synthetic sow's milk. It contains Y l r i j 7
a growth-stimulating antibiotic, I
terramycin.QI A^ 1 --T _

Study-weary students in a lan-
guage class on campus combined
patriotism with just plain mid-
year fatigue yesterday when they
agreed to exchange their blood for
a bolt.
"You're always asking for a bolt;
now you can have one," the in-
structor told the members of his
class.
He made one condition, how-
ever: that each student who was
willing and able give a pint of
blood for the soldiers fighting in
Korea. They readily agreed.
The students who are mostly
minors, are writing to their par-
ents for permission to give the
blood. The donations-and the
bolt-are set for the first part o0,
next week at the Red Cross Mobile
Blood Unit.

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HUNDREDS OF NEW SKIRTS
LOVELY NEW NOVELTY FABRICS, PURCHASED
FOR HOLIDAY WEAR. SILKS AND WOOLS.

Piglets grow faster and heavier,
are safer from disease and acci-
dent and more piglets can be pro-
duced with it, Herbert G. Luther,
research scientist said.
He described the milk, terralac
to a symposium on animal nutri-
tion at the University of Minneso-
ta.
After eight weeks, piglets getting
the synthetic milk weigh 10 to 35
per cent more than normally suck-I

Student special-rate tickets for
the Christmas trains to Chicago,
Buffalo, New York City, Rochester
and Albany will go on sale Dec. 3
to 17 at the Administration Bldg.
Vulcans, the senior engineering
fraternity will handle the ticket
sales for the third successive year.
The trains will be all student
coaches.

$7 95

to 1 9

-Daily-L. Wilk
TECHNICIANS BILL CALARNO, '55, AND DICK MENCZER, '55,
PRODUCE SOUND EFFECTS

HI.

EARLY
this year! '
STUDIO
521 East Libertyr
Phone 2-3053

Large selections -- 10 to 16.

TheIA R I LYN Shorpe
329-531 E, Liberty St. Michigan Theatre Bldg. 1

. . .
members will be taking part in
four regular programs, "A Name
To Remember," "The Musie
Makers," "The Golden Queen"
and "Radio Guild Laboratory
Theater."
Experience is definitely not a
prerequisite to Guild membership.
"Many members never saw a mi-
crophone before they joined our
group," Miss Loeblich said, "but
we hope to be able to use a good
many of them on regular pro-
grams within the n e x t few
months."
For those members interested'
Panel To Discuss
Arts Theatre Play
Arts Theatre Club will hold its
second panel discussion session of
the current fall season after to-
night's performance of "The
Knight of the Burning Pestle."
Prof. G. B. Harrison and Prof.
Marvin Felheim of the English
department and Homer Swander,
Grad., will comprise tonight's pan-
el. Held for the purpose of discus-
sing the club's current play, the
session is open to any interested
members of the club.
The current play will run tomor-
row night, regardless of the
Thanksgiving holiday, the Club
announced yesterday.

more in the technical side of ra-
dio, sound effects training is also
being given. Currently work is be-
ing done on the sound truck and
manual sound effects.
U' Research
to Seeky Plane
Wing De-Icers
Protection of aircraft from wing
icing will be the goal of a new re-
search project announced yester-
day by Prof. A. E. White, director
of the University Engineering Re-
search Institute.
A contract establishing an "anti-
icing research center" was signed
with the Wright Air Development
Center, a division of the United
States Air Force under Major Gen-
eral Frederick R. Dent.
The Air Force is expected to pro-
vide an airplane to convert into a
"Flying icing laboratory," accord-
ing to Prof. White. University sci-
entists will use this plane to ex-
amine the characteristics of de-
icing equipment.
The project, which will employ
special students and graduates,
will be under the direction of Prof.
Myron Tribus, who will arrive in
Ann Arbor today on leave from the
University of California.

led pigs, he said.

A

FOR THE FINEST
WHY NOT ENJOY THE TRADITIONAL
THANKSGIVING DINNER
At The Allenel Walnut Room
FULL COURSE DINNERS will be served
with fresh shrimp and oysters on the half shell
" TURKEY DINNER WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS
" BROILED LIVE MAINE LOBSTER
* ROAST PRIME RIBS OF BEEF AU ]US

:;

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