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November 18, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-18

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41

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

iSVNDAY, WO R 19, 1951

U I

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1951

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Cheating Found High at Cornell, UCLA
--_------- __________

Women's Choir, Singers Will
PresentConcert Tonight at Hill

By RARLAND BRITZ
"You guys are a bunch of cheat-
ers," the UCLA Bruin screamed at
its readers last week and they had
reason.
In a poll taken by the Bureau of
Student Opinion, 49 per cent of
the student body was found guilty
of the perennial bugaboo.
AND WITH amazingly similar
conclusions, another poll at Cor-
nell discovered that 47 per cent of
the students cheat.
Besides the confirmed cheaters
who admitted their guilt in 1950-
51, 17 per cent more admitted that
they had cheated at UCLA in pre-
vious years.
The UCLA researchers discov-
ered that the cheater is most
likely in a fraternity or sorority
and is in some phase of student

government or intercollegiate
sports. He is single and is fully
supported by his parents or sim-
ilar sources.
Groups there with the least
amount of cheating are veterans,
graduates and majors in the phy-
sical sciences. They are married,
over 25 years old and fully support
themselves. They are not in any
extra-curricular activities.
* * *
THE CORNELL poll found that
the more time a student spends
cheating, the less he is inclined to
cheat. The school with the largest
percentage of cheating is the ag-
riculture school.
Both polls queried a "repre-
sentative" group of students.
The fight against religious al-
ternation of student offices at the

NEw York University commerce
school has received aid from a
newly established politician.
In a letter to the school paper,
Rudolph Halley, former counsel
of the Kefauver Committee and
newly elected president of the New
York City Council, blasted the
"student's choice of their elected
spokesmen by any religious desig-
nation.
The battle against; racial des-
crimination has reached a new
front. "Members of the Negro
race," at Ohio State were quoted
as being opposed to minstrel
shows.
But several campus spokesmen
zoomed back at the charge and la-
beled it as "a narrow interpreta-
tion of intents and purposes of en-
tertainment of this character."

Several first performances will
be included in the joint concert
today by the Women's Choir and
Michigan Singers which will fea-
ture Russell Christopher, baritone.
The concert will be given at 8:30
in Hill Auditorium.
* * *
SCHUBERT'S "God in Nature,"
and two sixteenth century Latin
motets will be the first perform-
ances.
After intermission the Michi-
gan singers will follow with ex-
cerpts from Randall Thomp-
son's "The Peaceable Kingdom,"

u
Gretchaninoff's "The Cherubic
Hymn," Monteverde's "Lamento
D'Arianna," Di Lasso's "Valle
Profonda," and "Salvation Is
Created" by Tschesnokoff.
Conducted by Prof. Maynard
Klein of the music school, both
the choir and the singers are spe-
cial groups within the University
Choir. Approximately 90 per cent
of the Women's Choir are music
school students while the Michi-
gan Singers is a select group pre-
dominantely made up of literary
college men and women.

Union Offers
MethodTalk
To assist all student organiza-
tions in conducting orderly and
proper meetings, the Union is
again sponsoring a lecture on the
elements of parliamentary proce-
dure.
Prof. N. Edd Miller, of the speech
department, will conduct the one
hour session beginning at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday in the Union Ball-
room.
Invitations have been sent to
presidents of all campus groups
and all students are welcome to
attend.

*~~~~~~~~ V.'.''*..'*..**. . . . . . . . . . .l

t

ANOTHER Michigan pass is knocked down in yesterday's 6-0
humbling from Northwestern. The intended; receiver this time
is Lowell Perry.

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. .. _

"The Railroad Hour" has been
named the number one musical
show on the air.
This is the verdict of more than
6,000 listeners who cooperated with
a survey by the Universal Radio
and TV Feature Syndicate.
* * *
THE SHOW, starring Gordon
MacRae, has consistently come up
with original and clever ideas in
the scripts. Among last summer's
productions were a musical drama-
tization of the life of Stephen
Foster and an original script about
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Highlighting this fall's radio
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rie," "Sweethearts," and "The
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Their productions are musically
effective, and enjoyable to not on-
ly the trained musician, but also
to the music lover who doesn't
know very much about the tech-
niques involved.

guest stars of MacRae. Such favor-
ites as Dorothy Kirsten, Gladys
Swarthout, Rise Stevens, Nadine
Conner, and Lucille Norman have
all been slated for this year's pro-
grams.
Campus
Calendar
Dr. Reuben L. Kahn, professor
of serology, will discuss "Universal
Reactions in Health and Disease"
at a public meeting of the Phi
Sigma Biological Society at 8 p.m.
tomorrow in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
"Law Students for Taft," es-
tablished last month, will hold
its second meeting Tuesday in
the law club lounge.
Dr. Haven Emerson, professor-
emeritus of public health at Co-
lumbia University, will speak on
"Local Health Services for the Na-

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