100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 18, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGE THREE

a

Illinois . . . . 0 Mich. State
Ohio State . . 0 Indiana .

. 30 Purdue
. 26 Minnesota.

. 19 Wisconsin
. 13 Iowa . .

34 1 Stanford

.71

t. . 35
te. :14

S.M. U.
Arkansas

. .47 1UCLA.

. 20 Notre Dame
. 20 N. Carolina

.12
. 7

Oregon Sta

7 Washington

. .

J

n 1'r^a a s r ' T !V /'1 1I1 !Y'f f !\ ?> T1 f Y

i

SPEAKING SPORTS:Q u etW
Gloom of Defeat Quiets olverine Offense Outgains

Wildcats

mLichtgan Locker noon
By JIM PARKER
Associate Sports Editor
it's hard to imagine anything more pathetic than a beaten ath-
lete-unless it's a group of beaten athletes.
Such was the feeling that pervaded the Michigan dressing room
after the Wolverines had heard Northwestern's sorrowful rendition
of "Taps" to Michigan's last hope of salvaging a wiining season and
to its slim mathematical chance of capturing Big Ten title glory1
for the fifth straight year.1
HERE WAS THE Michigan team, a group of stout-hearted under-
dogs who had so valiantly fought to maintain a winning tradition, now
sitting silently in a dressing room where the only evidence of warmth
and cheer was that which was supplied by the steam drifting from
the shower room.
Here were gathered the young men who hadn't been granted
the slimest prayer of making better than a second division Con-
ference showing, but who had stunned the sporting world with a
fighting spirit that had carried them to three straight Big Ten
victories before Illinois had started to strip them of their Confer-
ence invincibility.
Here in the silence of their dressing room the Michigan players
x were left with only their exploded dreams to console them-if such a
thing were possible. There wasn't much talking-there wasn't any-
thing to say. They had done their best, but they just couldn't turn
back this fired-up Northwestern team that was bent on ending a
three-game losing streak of its own.
"WE JUST RAN OUT of steam," muttered Coach Bennie Ooster-
baan as he spoke softly from a corner of the dressing room.
Over in the Northwestern locker room boisterous, shouting
Wildcats, feeling only power surging through their veins after
beating Michigan, seemed more concerned with the score of an-
other Big Ten game-Illinois' tie game with Ohio State.
That was a score that gave the Wildcats a feeling of confidence
that they could shatter the Illini's Rose Bowl hopes again this year
as they had done on a snow-swept gridiron the year before at Evan-
ston. And these players were loudly proclaiming their intentions of
doing just that.
* * * *
NORTHWESTERN COACH Bob Voigts seemed as pleased as a
doomed convict who had just been granted a reprieve. "We've been
waiting for this one," said Voigts. "And, yes, we were sure we could
handle the Wolverines. We got our six points and we were sure we
could win with that much of a margin. That was all we needed."
The Wildcat coach was impressed by the defensive play of
Michigan, which held his squad to 156 yards rushing while Michi-
gan was gaining 244 on the ground. "That Osterman (Russ Oster-
man, defensive right end) played a great game against us. He
was wandering around in our backfield just a little too much for
my satisfaction," said the Northwestern mentor.
* * * *
AND BILL BILLINGS kicking was something that gave Voigts
more than a little concern. While the Flint junior didn't compile too
impressive an overall average, he sent one out on the one-foot line
and later dropped one out on the five.
Voigts was more than pleased with the results orf his pass
defense which hauled in five errant Michigan aerials. "We were
waiting for those passes," said Voigts.
But it's this writer's opinion that, with the exception of the two-
man defensive cloak the Wildcats had plaguinlg Lowell Perry, it was
more a case of Wolverine passers failing drastically to hit their targets
than it was of an over alert Northwestern pass defense. But then,
maybe that's just sour grapes.

4 *

Putich, Peterson Spark{
Michigan Running Game
(Continued from Page 1) :
Illinois has yet to lose a game in ",
Big Ten play. (The Illini were tiedw
by Ohio State yesterday0-0.)
Wisconsin also leads the Wol- ~
verines with a 4-1-1 record.;
For Michigan, Don Peterson
again carried a major load of the
Wolverines' ground game, and ac- N .
quitted himself well. But in the
second half even the quick-footed
fullback found it difficult to
broach an ever-stronger Wildcat
line.

THE WILDCAT forward wall,
with Riley, captain and guard Don
MacRae, and tackle James Howe
as the granite blocks, was great in
the clutch and its play belied-the
sorrowful losses to three straight
conference opponents.
Michigan's defense actually
played an excellent game after
the one scoring thrust by North-
western. Guard Don Dugger,
greatly improved over the course
of the season, was one standout.
Hard-tackling Roger Zatkoff
was another, and Larry LeClaire
came in in the fourth quarter
in place of Ted Topor to do a
good job of line-backing.
It was the Michigan offense,
dormant since the scoring outburst
against Minnesota, which spelled
defeat. The Wolverines used three
Purdue Eyes
Conference
Title Chance
CHIGAGO - R) - Darkhorse
Purdue could grab the Big Ten
Football Title next Saturday by
defeating Indiana-if Illinois loses
to Northwestern.
Purdue, virtually overlooked in
the title and Rose Bowl shuffle,
plays only a five game schedule.
Today the Boilermakers defeated
Minnesota 19-13 for a conference
record of 3-1-.750.
A win over Indiana could leave
Purdue with 4-1 for .800.
* * *
ILLINOIS' scoreless tie with
Ohio State 'today gave the Illini
a league mark of 4-0-1 for .900. A
tie counts as a half game won and
a half game loss.
If Northwestern should upset
Illinois Saturday, the Illini's fi-
nal reading would be 4-1-1 for
.750. However a tie would clinch
the title for Illinois with .833.
A Wisconsin victory Saturday
over Minnesota would give the
Badgers a record of 5-1-1 for .786.
CONFERENCE members vote on
the Rose Bowl representative. This
usually is a formality, since the
Champion, if eligible, has always'
been the choice in the past.
For the entire season thus far
Purdue has lost four games, to
Notre Dame 30-9, Wisconsin 31-7,
Miami of Florida 7-0, and Texas
14-0.

DON PETERSON
... blocks extra point
* * *
passers-Captain Bill Putich, To-
por, and freshman Duncan Mc-
Donald. None of them could ef-
fectively find their targets. Eigh-
teen throws netted five comple-
tions, none of them long yardage
plays. And a tendency to throw
STATISTICS
Michi- North-
gan western
FIRST DOWNS..........s17 e11
By rushing ........... 15 7
By passing............. 1 4
By penalty............ 1 0
RRUSHING YARDAGE .244 156
Number of Rushes ..59 50
PASSING YARDAGE ... 39 81
PASSES ATTEMPTED .. 18 16
PASSES COMPLETED .. 5 5
PASSES INTERCEPTED 1 5
PUNTS .......................10
PUNTING AVERAGE . 30 29
FUMBLES LOST ........ 2 0
YARDS PENALIZED ... 25 43

Bucks, Illinii
In Deadlock;'
MSC wins
NEW YORK -- (R) -- Stanford
continued its rush toward a Rose
Bowl bid today, but Illinois was
stopped cold in its tracks and had
to settle for a 0-0 tie with Ohio
State as most of the major col-
lege football teams scored impres. -
sive victories.
The main exception was Texas
Christian which bowed to Texas,
32-21, after hoping to pull out
front in the Southwest Confer-
ence and go on to the Cotton
Bowl.
MICHIGAN STATE, as usual,
had to spurt in the second half
after being tied at 14-14 at inter-
mission, to defeat Indiana, 30-26,
while Sugar Bowl-bound Tennes-
see ran over Mississippi, 46-21.
Maryland continued its march
toward the Southern Confer-
ence crown with a 53-0 victory
over North Carolina State. The
Terrapins, even if approval from
the Conference is not forthcom-
ing, will meet Tennessee in the
Sugar Bowl.
Georgia Tech, headed for a
post-season clash in the Orange
Bowl, had little trouble whipping
Alabama, 27-7. Notre Dame just
managed to outlast North Caro-
lina, 12-7, and Wisconsin kept its
hopes alive to win the Big Ten
Title and get the Rose Bowl nomi-
nation by flattening Iowa, 34-7.
, * *
STANFORD HAD rough going
with Oregon State for the first
half and could do no better than
a 7-7 deadlock. But the Indians
erupted for three touchdowns in
the third period to break the con-
test wide open and run up a 35-14
final margin.
Stanford now is virtually as-
sured of a Rose Bowl spot. Even
if the youthful Indians lose to
California next week, they'll
probably get in the post-season
classic.
. , ,
OHIO STATE, an in and out
club all season, completely stopped
the Illini and their ace back John-
ny Karras, who wound up his
day's toil with minus 11 yards in
14 tries. Nor could Ohio State
bulwark Vic Janowicz do anything
noteworthy. In fact, he fumbled
once on his own eight-yard line.

-Daily--Al Reid
GO AWAY, SON, you bother me, thinks Michigan fullback Don
Peterson (46) as he applies the straightarm to would-be Wildcat
tackler John Steeb (86). Peterson was one of the few bright spots
in Michigan's 6-0 loss to Northwestern which eliminated the Wol-
verines from Big Ten title chances.
National Grid Roundup

Undefeated
Tigers Jolt
Yale,_27m0
PRINCETON, N.J. (P)-Dandy
Dick Kazmaier had one of the
biggest days of his brilliant foot-
ball career yesterday as he led
Princeton's unbeaten Tigers to a
record-smashing 27 to 0 victory
over their oldest rival, Yale.
Kazmaier engineered every Ti-
ger touchdown and gained a total
of 237 yards by running and pas
ing. He wiped out the eastern
record for ground-gaining in one
season and gave Princeton the
Big Three Championship for the
fifth straight year, a feat no team
has accomplished since Yale and
Princeton first met in 1873.
THE VICTORY was Princeton's
21st in succession over a three-
year stretch, adding one more tri-
umph to a string of record length.
Kazmaier scored only one
touchdown himself-on a nine-
yard end run. But his passes
accounted for the other three.
He tossed twice to end Len
Lyons and once to Frank Mc-
Phee, the stellar defensive end
who came in just to catch a
pass.
Today's 132 yards by rushing
and 105 by passing gave Kazmaier
a season total of 1707 yards. This
surpassed the eastern mark of
1693 yards set by Red Marchibroda
of St. Bonaventure last year.
Late Scores
Montreal 3, New York 2
Toronto 1, Boston 1

EAST
Penn 7, Army 6
Harvard 34, Brown 21
Navy 21, Columbia 7
Boston College 20, Villanova 13
Princeton 27, Yale 0
Fordham 35, Temple 6
Wesleyan 6. Trinity 3
Cornell 21, Dartmouth 13
Syracuse 9, Colgate 0
Boston University 39, Wichita 6
Penn State 13, Rutgers 7
Wiliams 40, Amherst 7
Connecticut 21, Rhode Island 6
Pittsburgh 32, West Virginia 12
MIDWEST
.Oklahoma 35, Iowa State 6
Great Lakes 20, Pensacola Naval 6
Wooster 47, Oberlin 14
Denison 14, Case 7
Muskingum 14, Otterbein 19
Miami (O) 34, Western Reserve 7
Bowling Green 20, Bradley 6
Colorado 36, Nebraska 14
Kansas State 14, Missouri 12
Southeast Missouri Tchrs. 45, South-
ern Illinois 6
Marquette 26, Detroit 13
New Hampshire 7, Kent State 0
Xavier (O.) 26, Cincinnati 0
SOUTH
Kentucky 47. George Wahsington 13
Tennessee 46, Mississippi 21
Florida A & M 36, Southern Univer-
sity 6

Georgia 46, Auburn 14
William and Mary 14, Duke 13
Notre Dame 12, North Carolina 7
IVirginia 28, South Carolina 27
Maryland 53, North Carolina State 0
Clemson 34, Furman 14
! Georgia Tech 27, Alabama 7
Louisville 14, Washington and Lee 7
Tulane 14, Vanderbilt 10
SOUTHWEST
Kansas 27, Oklahoma A & M 12
Rice 28, Texas A & M 13
!Southern Methodist 47, Arkansas 7
Texas 32, Texas Christian21
Baylor 42, Wake Forest 0
Tulsa 21, Texas Tech 14
Arkansas A & M 34, College of Ozarks
New Mexico 34, Brigham Young 0
FAR WEST
Utah 27, Colorado A & M 21
Washington State 47, Montana 10
California 28, Oregon 26
Who Launders KYER
shirtsLaundry
' Best t# 0
t

short of the receivers

enabled

p jwl

SPORTS
HERB COHEN: Night Editor

Northwestern's secondary to in-
tercept five.
* * *
MICHIGAN'S MOST effective
plays were weak side thrusts, with
Wes Bradford and Frank Howell
carrying. And an occasional sweep
with Putich or Peterson carrying
gained well-as long as the Wol-
verines were in Wolverine terri-
tory.
*neups
MICHIGAN
LE PERRY, Stanford, Dingman
LT JOHNSON, Zatkoff, Bennett
LG KINYON, Kelsey
C O'SHAUGHNESSY
RG WOLTER, Dugger, Timm
RT STRIBE, Balog, Pederson
RE PICKARD, Osterman, Green
QB TOPOR, Billingan, Zanfagna, Mc-
Donald
LH PUTICH, Howell
RH BRADFORD, Oldham, Wither-
spoon
FB PETERSON, LeClaire, Rescorla
NORTHWESTERN
LE KUEHL, Steeb, Crawford
LT HUIZINGA, J. Roche, Dyer
LG EVANS, MacRae, Katchaturoff
C HUNT, Riley
RG JECHA, Carse, Damore, Belejack
RT YOUNG, Duffill, Howe, Berrin
RE KRAGSETH, Rich
QB BURSON. Springer, Rondon
LH ALBAN, Bennett
RH JONES, Webber, Israels
FB HREN, Johnson, Athan, O'Brien

THE NEWEST
CAMPUS FAD!
BE THE FIRST ON YOUR CAMPUS!
YOUR FIRST NAME OR YOUR IN-
ITIALS PRINTED IN GENUINE 23
CARAT GOLD ON GENUINE LEATH-
ER (size: 2" x 1"). ATTACH IT TO
YOUR SWEATER. BLOUSE OR ANY-
THING ELSE YOU WEAR . . . IT
LOOKS SMART, IT IS SMART, IT
IS VERY NEW . . . 3 gold-lettered
namelets for $1.00 post paid with
the same name or initials. (40c for
one) Assorted colors of leather -
black, tan, brown, red, or green.
State color wanted. Please print
name or initials wanted and address.
Send check or money order to

TRY A
PERSONALITY CUT
Shaped and blended to
your features
Today!!!
The DaBscola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

CHRISTMAS
CARDS
Christmas Wrappings
Stationery Gift Boxes
Fountain Pens
TYPEWRITERS, Sales
Service, Rentals
MORRILLS
S314 S. State St., Ph. 7177

The Largest
Display of
CHRISTMAS
CARDS
in the city
50 for $1.25 -
with your name
BEAUTIFUL BOX
ASSORTMENTS
and up
ULRICH'S

Peter Arno-Ladies and Gentlemen .......... 3.50
Cobean-Naked Eye......................2.95
Kelly- Pogo ...........................1.00
Hirchfeld-Show Business Is No Business.... .2.95
Steig-The Rejected Lovers........... .... .2.95
Lynes-Snobs ........................... .00
New Yorker 25th Anniversary Album........ 5.00
and many others
OVERBECK BOKSTORE

.awmrer

F

r..__._ . ..... ___ .._..------ -- -- i i

SEE
An Exciting Voyage
With the Last of
the World's Great
Sailing Fleets

BLUE GRASS
D EOD RANTS
Will the most
cherished perfume!
EASY. ..EFFECTIVE...SAFE-
AND A THOUSAND TIMES
MORE GLAMOROUS!
Jbst think! Elizabeth Arden's
cherished Blue Grass perfume,
subtly blended in a smooth
cream deodorant or a fresh
liquid deodorant in a plastic
spray bottle. Keeps you im-
maculate the exquisite way.
Marveloasly effective-and like
all Miss Arden's preparations,
you need less to do more.
LIQUID DEODORANT in plastic
spray bottle, 1.00
CREAM DEODORANT, 1.25)
Prices lus tar

DISTINCTIVELY YOURS
The mark of individuality is a Tuxedo
hand-tailored by Tinker & Company.
Have it fitted for the Holiday Season.
Single, or double-breasted shawl
collar with piped or regular
pockets. In black or midnight
blue. Order now to insure
early delivery.

11 S

v

"The Quest of the Schooner Argus"
Motion Picture Lecture - A Thrilling Epic of the Sea
ALAN VILLIES
NOTED CAMERAMAN AND AUTHOR

I ' - '
- C - ---I r

11

SPECIALLY PRICED AT

Six months of excitement and adventure with the Portuguese codfishing fleet in the perilous
waters of the North Atlantic. "Their experiences are recounted with the skill of a trained
reporter and their ceaseless battles with the uncompromising sea are impressive because they
are flawlessly documented . . , one almost instinctively looks about for Moby Dick"-
Memphis Commercial Appeal.

_67*5. \O

.=

11

I I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan