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November 17, 1951 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-17

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1951

THE MICHiGAN DAlIN

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1951 -

DOUBLE DUTY:
Soldier Sheds Uniform
For Role in 'Ruddigore'

TRANSPORT 'CINDERELLA':
Prof. Worley Defends Truck industry

.
rtJ

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
An Army unif.orm has been
temporarily shed by one member
of the Gilbert and Sullivan Soci-
ety's "Ruddigore" cast, in favor of
grease paint and a fisherman's
uniform.
On an extended leave before em-
barking for the Pacific, Pvt. Fred
Scheffler, '50, of Detroit, a charter
member of the society, wandered
Deans Open
IWorks ho p
Challenging students to justify
the existence of self-government
in the dorms, Dean of Students
Erich A. Walter and Assistant
Dean of the literary college, James
H. Robertson, last night gave the
two-day residence hall govern-
ment workshop a formal send-off.
Dean Walter and Dean Robert-
son spoke at dinner in West Quad
held last night for dorm and fa-
culty representatives. Sponsored by
the Joint House Presidents Coun-
cil, the actual workshop business
will be conducted this morning in
several discussion groups made up
of executive officers from both
men's and women's dorms.
THE PREMISE upon which the
workshop's activities will be based
is the Michigan House Plan. This
plan, according to Dean Robertson,
assumes that life in resident halls
s an integral part of campus ex-
perience and should provide cul-
tural and social opportunities to
the students.
"Your main job, however is to
bring your electors along with
you," Robertson told the group of
student leaders.
Even if dorm government con-
sists merely in providing towel
racks, it must be more than a
superstructure and must act as
a vital force in which everyone
can participate, he emphasized.
Summing up, Dean Walter said,
"If in 1975 you can look back and
say that you had a hand in es-
tablishing a more vital faith in
student government, you will be
accomplishing the purpose of this
workshop'
SL Normal
After Quiet
Ballot Count
(Continued from Page 1)
Bob Baker, '52BAd, was at a
loss to explain his record perform-
ance. His campaign consisted of
120 letters and speeches at one
house meeting, one open house,
and one sorority.
His 330 total is even more
amazing in light of the fact that
Bill McIntyre, '52, set his 318 rec-
ord in a semester when 7,900 voted,
while only 6,500 went to the polls
this time.
This marked the third straight
semester the vote has dropped,
and the lowest total since spring,
'48, when 5,800 cast ballots. The
low-water mark for the five-year-
old legislature was the spring of
.47, when only 3,000 votes were
tallied.,
The last four elected, Jerry
Gleich, '53, Miss Haar, Jim Smead,
'53, and Tom Ricketts, '54A, are
replacing SL members elected last1
spring, but who have since left

the legislature for one reason or
another. Their terms will expire
next spring.

into Ann Arbor a week ag in
time to .get into the production,
* * * -
A ONE-TIME Society president
and one of its most ardent mem-
bers, Scheffler's leave has made it
possible for him to keep intact
an unbroken chain of G and S
performances which began in 1947.
At that time, an eager sophomore,
he appeared as a member of the
chorus.
Every succeeding semester
found him enhancing the G & S
chorus line, and'even after his
graduation he continued his
contact by commuting from his
home in order to be in the shows.
"I never got beyond the chorus,"
he explained, "because I can't
sing." This lack of ability did not
dampen Scheffler's enthusiasm
however. "I can always keep the
tune with the help of the fellow
next to me," he added.
SCHEFFLER'S long experience
made it easy for him to fit right
into the "Ruddigore" line. "I feel
a little guilty," he observed.
"Everyone else practiced for weeks,
I just walked in and picked up the
routines."
The private's diversion from
more serious business will end
tomorrow, when he will fly to
Ft. Lawton, the port of ema-
barkation in Seattle. This sche-
dule will luckily allow him to
finish the "Ruddigore" run. The
show will continue at 8 p.m. to-
day.
Looking to the future, Scheffler
is afraid the Society might have
to carry on without him next se-
mester. But he hasn't entirely giv-
en up hope yet. "I've already ap-
plied for a leave for next April,"
he said.
Law Students
To Compete
In 1Moot-Trial
Three members of the Law
School Case Clubs will represent
the University in a regional moot-
court competition to begin today
in Detroit.
The Detroit proceedings are a
part of a nation-wide competition
which will be climaxed by argu-
ments before a Justice of the U.S.
Supreme Court Dec. 13 and 14 in
New York.
THE CASE to be argued con-
cerns the rights of a witness who
refuses to testify before a Con-
gressional committee because the
investigation is being televised.
Members of the Case Clubs
team will be Dean Olds, '52L,
Francis J. Pruss, 152U, and
Laurence Spitters,'52L. In addi-
tion to the Detroit area, regional
competitions are also being held
today throughout the country.
Here in Ann Arbor the Case
Clubs will present a public trial at
7:30 p.xit. Monday in the Union.
The matter in question at the
hearing will be whether a father
is guilty of manslaughter for not
providing medical care for his
child.
Although all Case Club trials
are open to the public, the lawyers
have set aside this trial especially
to demonstrate their procedures
more fully to the student body, ac-
cording to Dick Pogue, '53L.
Wethey To Speak
On Art Exhibition
Prof. Harold E. Wethey, of the
fine arts department, will talk on
the current art exhibition, "Italian,
Spanish and French Paintings of
the 17th and 18th Centuries," at

3:30 p.m. tomorrow in the West
Gallery of Alumni Memorial Hall.

By MIKE SCHERER
Trucking is the "Cinderella" of
the transport family, according to
Prof. Emeritus John S. Worley, of
the University transport engineer-
ing department, one of the coun-
try's leading highway authorities.
Prof. Worley vigorously defend-
ed the trucking industry against
attackers in an article "In Defense
of Trucks" which appeared in the
November issue of "American Mer-
cury" magazine.
* * *
THE INDUSTRY, according to
Prof. Worley, is "abused out of
hand, badgered by punitive legisla-
tion and taxes and, above all,
blamed for all the ills to which
motor highways are heir."
Prof. Worley says that trucks,
as big and obvious as they are on

the roads today, make a con-
venient whipping boy for traffic
annoyances by road officials, tax
officials, automotive outfits and
writers.
He blamed editors of national
magazines which recently assailed
the motor freight industry for be-
ing all too human and sharing the
"irrational spleen" of their read-
ers. This makes them easy tar-
gets for anti-truck propaganda.
ACCORDING TO Prof. Worley,
neither the editor nor the reader
stops to consider that the growth
of trucking reflects and accelerates
the American way of life. Some
25,000 American communities are
totally dependent on trucks for
their transportation.
Besides serving small towns

without railroads, trucks are
links between the railroads and
consumers. They are the main-
stay of small businesses which
cannot afford to buy their sup-
plies in carloads.
The article points out that one
in every seven jobs in the United
States is provided by the trucking
industry. Elaborating, Prof. Wor-
ley said that t ere are five million
truck drivers, nearly a million
drivers and millions more engaged
in all aspects of manufacture, sales
and supply for automotive car-
riers.
Most of the recent objections to
trucks have been in regard to the
overload problem and its influence
on America's roads. Prof. Worley
said overload cases are in a mi-
nority, and do not reflect the sen-
timent of the entire industry.

}

.

asbigand obious sveyarevon

Besides serving small towns timent of the entire industry.

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
" NEW COMMAND-Colonel William Todd, head of the University's Air Force ROTC unit confirms
the appointment of four new cadet Colonels. They are, left to right, Bob Beckett, '52E; Pat Cousland,
'52E; Dave Leslie, 52A and Bob Shelter, '53E. The cadet commanders will supervise the training of over
660 AFROTC cadets under the administration of Col. Todd. They were appointed upon the basis of
scholastic ability and leadership qualities. Last year, only one cadet colonel was chosen, but because
the size of the unit has tripled this semester, three new ones were appointed. Their commissions will
terminate at the end of the academic year after which they will receive second lieutenant commis-
sions in the Air Force.

Townsfolk will
Fete Foreign
HolidayGuests
An international flavor will
spice Thanksgiving dinner in many
local homes Thursday.
As in previous years, many for-
eign students will be holiday guests
of townspeople, through arrange-
ments made by the International
Center.
This service is one of the Center
activities designed to increase op-
portunities to introduce foreigners
to Americans, according to Mrs.
Margaret Mead, social director.
THE FALL holiday corresponds
to similar festivals students cele-
brate in other countrie's, such as
the gid-Autumn festival of China
and the Hindu and Moslem Diwali
celebration.
More than a hundred foreign
students have signed up for
placement this year under the
program, which has been in ef-
fect several years with an in-
creasingly large response each
year.
Local civic clubs, women's or-
ganizations and individual citizens
have been contacted to have the
foreign students as guests.
Church groups may cooperate in
the distribution of invitations
through Doris Reed, Inter-deno-
minational Secretary for Protes-
tant Students, at Lane Hall. Invi-
tations are also being channeled
through the International Center
with Mrs. Mead.
Regent Denies
Serate Hopes
University Regent Roscoe O.
Bonisteel, Ann Arbor attorney,
denied yesterday that he might
seek the Republican nomination
for the United States Senate.
A Lansing dispatch earlier in the
day had indicated that "some Re-
publicans" had proposed Bonisteel
as a GOP Senate contestant.
"I am deeply appreciative of the
honor some friends have bestowed
upon me in proposing my name,"
Bonisteel said. "But I will not be
put forward as a candidate."
Only avowed candidate for the
GOP Senate nomination at pres-
ent is state Auditor General John
B. Martin, Jr.
Community Chest
Fund Drive Ends
The Ann Arbor Community
Chest fund drive officially closed
yesterday with 76.3 per cent of it
$176,600 goal reached.
However, Chest officials reported
that some soliciting will continue
and donations will still be accept-
ed in an attempt to bolster the
$134,716 kitty now at hand.

Eager Males Offer 'U' Coed
Fraternity Pins in Reply to Ad

Beverly Pack, '55 is going to be
the "most pinned" girl on campus
next week.
An ad, which some unknown
friend inserted in the Daily classi-
fieds yesterday, stated that she
Cloral Groups
To Sigt Hill
Russell Christopher, '5 2SM,
baritone, will sing "The Highway-
man" for the first joint University
Women's Choir and Michigan
Singers concert of the season at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Audi-
torium.
Several first performances will
be included in the program. These
are Schubert's "God in Nature,"
to be sung by the Women's Choir,
and two sixteenth century Latin
motets, to be rendered by the
Michigan Singers. In addition ex-
cerpts from "The Peaceable King-
dom" by Randall Thompson and
Tschesnokoff's "Salvation Is Cre-
ated" will be presented.
Conducted by Prof. Maynard
Klein of the University Music
School, both the Women's Choir
and the Michigan Singers are spe-
cial groups within the University
Choir.
The performance will be open to
the public.

"desperately wanted to rent or
borrow for week's time-fraternity
pin (no preference)." The re-
sponse, according to Miss Pack,
has been "overwhelming."
* * *
AT FIRST surprised by her un-
solicited pin offers, Miss Pack de-
cided to take advantage of the joke
and has been accepting all offers.
With four pins already collected,
she expects to have quite a for-
midable collection to display. j
She revealed that Michigan
men have been very generous-
none of them have offered their
pins on a rental basis.
Reaction to her "plight" has
been very sympathetic, Miss Pack
explained, although "one fellow
looked at me awfully funny when
he gave me his pin."
Another practical jokester in-
serted an ad in yesterday's paper
asking "the girl who has Marshall
Hershon's pin to please return it
immediately." The origin and re-
sults of this ad are still undeter-
mined.
Who Launders KYER MODEL
Shirts Best? LAUNDRY
4 j~p A

I e "
A,*U
, ~
More Days
IF YOU WISH TO SELECT YOUR
Personalized
ChristmasCad
At
Chester Roberts Gifts
LARGEST SELECTION IN ANN ARBOR

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833' Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M:-Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-Mortals and Immortals.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.-Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P. M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased,
Ths roam is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A M to 5 P.M.; Fridays 7-9
P. M., Saturday 3-5 P.M.
SPECIAL THANKSGIVING SERVICE
to be held in all
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCHES
As is customary in all Christian Science Church-
es, a special Thanksgiving service will be held on
Thanksgiving Day in First Church of Christ, Scien-
tist, Ann Arbor at eleven a.m.
Following the usual order of service there will
be a brief period in which members of the con-
gregation may express their gratitude for healings
and other help which they have received during
the past year,
The Golden Text from Psalms (92:1) is appro-
priate for the occasion and reads: "It is a good
thing to give thanks unto the Lord, and to sing
praises unto thy name, 0 most High.
The Bible citations include Psalms (100:5)
"Forhthe Lord is good; his mercy is everlasting;
and his truth endureth to all generations."
Among the citations from "Science and Health
with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy,
(Pref. vii.) will be the following: "To those
leaning on the sustaining infinite, today is big
with blessings."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed-
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev, Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P:M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship; Sermon by Rev.
Press "Our Cause for Gratitude."
6:15 P.M.: Student Guild. Discussion Topic:
"God's Judgment and This World Order."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenow Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday at 4:30: Open House after the game.
Sunday at 10:30: Worship Service, with the pas-
tor preaching on the subject, "Christ Recon-
ciling the World."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Business meeting
and taking of picture for the 'Ensian.
Thursday at 10:30 A.M : Thanksgiving Day Ser-
vice."Sermon, ':'Thankfulness-a Fruit of
Faith."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Betty Lou Jockwig, Associate Student Counselor
11:00 A.M.: Man and Missions.
7:00 P.M.: Meeting with Wesleyan Guild-Dr.
Bosley.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1d'29 \A/ +fp,

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Sreet
Dwight S. Large, E and J. Wangdahl,
l!ugene Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar.
10:45 A.M.: Worship: "How Much Nearer is
Peace?" Dr. Harold A. Bosley preaching.
4:15 P.M.: Bible Study, Green Rom.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Dr. Harold
Bosley-Subiect: "We Believe in Jesus Christ."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily!
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (Nursery for chil-
dren). Sermon: "Our Goodly Heritage"
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Marilynn Paterson, Assistant
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 P.M. supper and 6:45
program: Packing Party to send clothing to
Europe.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill & Forest Ave. Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at Center.
10:30 A.M.: Services in Zion & Trinity Churches.
Reverend Yoder will preach in Trinity Church.
5:30 P.M.: LSA Meeting-Program 7:00.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine'
The Reverend Henry Lewis, S.T.D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koonz, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
Miss Ada May Ames, Counsellor for Women
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Church School (Nursery-9th grade).
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the
RightrReverend Herman Page, Bishop of
Northern Michigan.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
:530 P.M.: Canterbury Club. Speaker: Bishop
Page.
6:30 P.M.: High School Club.
6:45 P.M.: Seminar on Christian Living.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.
Wednesday, 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast).
Friday,) 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed
by Student Breakfast).
12:10 P.M.: Holy Communion.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Church School and Adult
Group, Juniqr High and High School Program.
Mr. K. S hay-"Hinduism"
Mr. F. Hussain-"'slam"
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship-Rev. Edward H.
Redman preaching on "The Genteel Tradition."
2:30-6:00 P.M.: Volunteers engaged in taking
a religious census of Ann Arbor.
7:00 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group meeting at
Lane Hall.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
in Ann Arbor
736 South State Street
Wednesday, 8 P.M.
Open Class
"The Study of Life"
THE VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center Chapel
Willow Run
Reverend Bloise Levol, Pastor
Sunday, November 18th, 1951
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Sermon "Thanks-
livimg."
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
5:00 P.M.: Thanksgiving Fellowship Potluck
Supper.
7:00 P.M.: Thanksgiving Vesper Service.
Movie-"The Apostle."
EchCT rrU r_ ATr A I D"L3IIB iLI

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