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November 15, 1951 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I
4 --

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1951

I __________________________________ I I

YOUNG PROGRESSIVE:
MacDougall Finds 'U' Niche

By HELENE SIMON
When Gordon MacDougall hit
campus as a freshman in the fall
of 1948, he began looking around
for a liberal organization.
Young Progressives turned out
to be just his meat. Becoming
president of the organization the
following spring, MacDougall
formed the opinion, which he still
holds, that YP is the most demo-
cratic group on campus.
HE BELIEVES that "all import-
ant movements started at the Uni-
versity, such as the Willie McGee
Committee, have been instigated
by the left-wingers."
"The Young Democrats or
Young Republicans have not
been responsible for any signifi-
cant social movement on this
campus," MacDougall declared.
At present, he is operating be-
hind the scenes instead of behind
the rostrum. Having ended his
career as president last spring his
position now "is advising YP on
how to make its influence felt. It's
time the younger element had a
chance to develop its leadership,"
MacDougall feels.
"MacDougall admits, "it
doesn't feel good to be a scape-
goat, but I'm confident that,
like the red witch hunts of the
'20's, times will change and turn
back to the Roosevelt practices
and philosophies which the
present administration seems to
have betrayed.
"In 1948 the Student Legislature
and other organizations had, a
large YP following. We didn't
MSC Professor
To SpeakToday
Speaking on "Problems of Tem-
perament and Tuning," Prof. Mur-
ray J. Barbour, of the music de-
partment at Michigan State Col-
lege, will be heard as guest lectur-
er at 4:15 p.m. today in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
The lecture, which is being
sponsored by the music school, will
be open to the public.
THE NEWEST
CAMPUS FADS
BE THE FIRST ON YOUR CAMPUS)
YOU1~R FIRST NAME OR YOUR IN-
ITIALS PRINTED IN GENUINE 23
CARAT GOLD ON GENUINE LEATH-
ER (size: 2" x 1"). ATTACH IT TO
YOUR SWEATER, BLOUSE OR ANY-
THING ELSE YOU WEAR... IT
LOOKS SMART, IT IS SMART, IT
IS'VERY NEW . . . 3 gold-lettered
namelets for $1.00 post paid with
the same hame or initials. (40c for
one) Assorted colors of leather -
black, tan, brown, red, or green.
State color wanted. Please print
name or initials wanted and address.
Send check or money order to
STAR CRAFT
1629 Edgewater Ave,. Chicago 26, I11.

-Daily-Al Reid

Jones H its
President's
News Bar
Leveling a blast at the recent
presidential directive which auth-
orizes "bureaucrats" to with-hold
information from the press, news-
paper editor Alexander F. Jones
opened the 1951-52 Journalism
Lecture Series yesterday afternoon.
The attempt of newspapers to
furnish the public with the "un-
varnished facts" is hindered by
the new security measure, Jones,
president of the American Society
of Newspaper Editors, asserted.
. , ,
"PROVIDING governmental of-
ficials with an opportunity to hide
blunders behind its shield, the
directive allows them to surpress
news at their individual discre-
tion," he declared.
Clarifying the role of the news-
paper today, Jones stated that
"Journalism has come of age."
"No longer molders of public
opinion, the best newspapers
can do is present the facts and
stimulate the public with edi-
torial opinion," Jones added.
He explained that not only were
newsmen being denied the news,
they were also charged with keep-
ing secret anything detrimental
to national security which was in-
advertently released to them.
Citing the muzzling of the Ar-
gentine newspaper La Prenza, un-
der President Juan Peron, Jones
said, "In much of the world, the
light of a free press has gone out.
Wherever a dictator has stifled
the rights of free men, his first
step has been to cut off the free-
dom of information."
Eng;ine Display
To Open Todaly
A bus-load of electrical equip-
ment will be on display today in
the East Engineering Building
court, behind the building on For-
est Street.
A nationally known anufactur-
er of electrical instruments and
equipment is conducting the dis-
play, which will open at 8:30 a.m.
and close at about 5 p.m.
, , ,.
SEVERAL ENGINEERING class-
es are expected to make trips to
inspect the distribution and con-
trol devices in the display. The ex-
hibit is sponsored jointly by the
University electrical and mechani-
cal engineering departments.
Any students interested are in-
vited to visit the display, accord-
ing to Vern Winn, representative
of the company. The bus has been
making a tour of American colleges
and universities for inspection by
students.

CRASH VICTIM-Rescuers carry a man from the wreckage of
two Union Pacific passenger tiins which collided in Wyoming.
Crews yesterday began clearing away the tangled rubble which has
already yielded 16 bodies.
HUMAN ETHICS:
Sperry Hits Mercenary
Doctors, MercyKillings

Choral Union Concert Will
Feature Pianist Brailowsky

Marking the half-way point in1
the Choral Union Series, Alexan-t
der Brailowsky, celebrated Rus-
sian pianist, will appear here for
the fourth time at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Hill Auditorium.
The program will feature five
compositions by Chopin, one of
Brailowsky's favorite composers.
Works by Beethoven, Schumann,
Debussy and Liszt will also be in-
cluded.-
.* *
ALTHOUGH his first appear-x
ance in Ann Arbor was in 1930,
Brailowsky has been touring thex
United States continuously since1
1924. The piano virtuoso has re-t
ceived acclaim from coast to coast.
He has also made several ap-
pearances in South America and
in Paris, London, Brussels, Zur-
ich, Copenhagen and Stockholm
in Europe.
Brailowsky was coached at home
in Russia by his musically talented
father until taken to Vienna at the
age of thirteen where he studied
under Leschetizky. Following his
Vienna apprenticeship, he moved
to Switzerland where Ferrucio Bu-
soni took a proprietory interest in
his career.
HIS DEBUT recital, however,
was in France. The performance
Groups Combine
To Give Concert
The University Women's Choir
and the Michigan Singers will pre-
sent a concert at 8:30 p.m. Sunday
in Hill Auditorium featuring Rus-
sell Christopher, baritone.
Prof. Maynard Klein of the mu-
sic school will conduct. The con-
cert is open to the public.

GORDON MACDOUGAlL

* * *,
stick out like sore thumbs. Now the
character of the country has be-
come less sane," he charged.
YP HAS NOT been MacDougall's
only interest. His name has been
on the roll of SL and the Commit-
tee to End Discrimination. I'n the
summer of 1950, he was a delegate
IFC To Hold
Pledge_.Dinner
A pledge banquet to celebrate
the 101st anniversary of fraterni-
ties on the University campus will
be held Dec. 5 in the Union Ball-
room, the Interfraternity Council
announced yesterday.
Lawrence B. Lindemere, 148L,
State Representative from Stock-
bridge, Mich., will be the main
speaker. Director of University
Relations Arthur Brandon will
award the Sigma Chi scholarship
trophy to the pledge group with
the highest scholastic average.
All members of the present
pledge classes and all fraternity
house presidents will be invited
to attend the dinner.

led to engagements in all the capi-
tals of Europe.
While in Belgium, Brailowsky
became a favorite of Queen
Elizabeth's. In 1936, the Belgian
government awarded him the
"Kreisler Prize," bi - annually
awarded to the most gifted
young pianist in Belgium. Since
that time he has toured the
world several times.
His best known work is "Chopin
Cycle," a presentation of the life
works of the Polish master in six
recitals.
Tickets for tomorrow's concert
may be purchasedxat the Burton
Memorial Tower or the Hill Audi-
torium Box Office for the new
tax-exempt prices of $2.50, $2.00
and $1.50.
Announcing
The Arrival
Of Our New
Record Annex
211 S. State
LIBERTY
Music Shops

Who Launders
Shirts Best!k

F --I

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KYER MODEL
LAUNDRY

to the National Student Associa-
tion Congress.
Among policies advocated by
Maclougall is a student ex-
change program between East
and West, which "would result
in better understanding on both
sides for the U.S. and USSR."
MacDougal hopes to make poli-
tics his career. If these aspirations
are realized, MacDougall intends
to run on a third party ticket be-
cause "it is more effective to stay
outside the two major parties."
Coed Board.
May Control
U' ]Discipline
(Continued from Page 1)
Under the rules established in
regard to the probationary per-
iod, the student would not be
required to work later than
10 p.m.
Neither would she be required
to work less than three hours at
a time nor more than eight hours
per day.
Working hours would be ar-
ranged with the employer so that
they would not conflict with the
student's classes, and no excuse
for absence from work would be
considered valid except regular
college vacations, certified bed-
illnesses and attendance at re-
quired scholastic events.
* * *
WHEN PROBATION is granted,
the Dean of Women would inform
the woman's house president and
director, the dean of her college,
the Office of Student Affairs and
Health Service.
If the attitude, effort or work
of the probationer should be-
come unsatisfactory, her supervi-
sor would notify the Office of the
Dean of Women and reconsidera-
tion of the case would be made.
Pre-law Society
To Hear Edwards
George Edwards, former presi-
dent of the Detroit City Council,
will address the Michigan Crib So-
ciety on "The Position of the Law-
yer in the Community" at 8 p.m.
today in the Union.
The function of the Law School
Case Clubs will be explained by a
member of the Society.

"It is the doctor's duty to serve
the community, not to milk it,"
Dr. Willard L. Sperry, dean of
Harvard Divinity School declared
here last night.
Dr. Sperry, who spoke on "Prob-
lems in Human Ethics and Medical
Values," condemned specialists
whose offices are "like high-pow-
ered mills."
"THESE professional men act
like business men," Sperry said.
He felt that the situation could
lead to "socialized medicine."
The American Medical Asso-
ciation can only publish codes
of ethics," he said. "It is the
doctor's duty to observe them."
Another problem which often
TV Hour To. Show
Prof. MeKeachie
Prof. Wilbert McKeachie of the
psychology department will appear
on the University Television Hour
at 1 p.m. Sunday over WWJ-TV.
Prof. McKeachie will lecture on
human abilities and how they are
developed.
The show will also continue its
series on "Democracy in Action:
Parliamentary Procedures," and
will conclude with a teletour of the
University Audio-Visual Education
Center.

' ' -

confronts the doctor, Dr Sperry
pointed out, is whether to allow a
patient to die when treatment can
prolong his life for a short time.
"In a democratic society,
man's life is valuable. To dis-
pose of a person needlessly for
the sake of economy or efficien-
cy is a totalitarian attitude," he
asserted.
Dr. Sperry said that no doctor or
group of doctors should take the
matter of mercy-killing into his
own hands.
Under the Euthanasia Society's
bill, the decision to be killed pain-
lessly would lie with* the patient,
he explained. He would file a re-
quest with the court and be ex-
amined by a commission of lay-
men and physicians. After a short
lapse of time, if the patient still
desired death, it would be ad-
ministered.

The International Center a
and the
International Students Assoc.
invite you to come to
MONTE
CA RLO
o An All-Campus Dance
EARL PEARSON ORCHESTRA
in the gay atmosphere
of the French Riviera
RACKHAM BALLROOM
Saturday, Nov. 17th, 8-12V

WARNING!
It's time to plan Christmas
gifts. We have everything
for the camera fan.
also
PHOTO GREETING CARDS
Camera Department
Purchase Radio & Camera Shop
Phone 8696 Church at S. University"

.4

READ and USE
DAILY
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