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November 15, 1951 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-15

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1951

Earl

Warren Enters

GOP

Race

ELIUINE ,'AE/M

MEETS MONDAY:
NCAA To Plan Program
Of Deem phasis in Athletics
CHICAGO-(AP)-The Council of the National Collegiate Athletic
Association will meet here next Monday and Tuesday to draw up a
definite program for control of athletics and elimination of pressures
which have produced over-emphasis.
Kenneth L. Wilson, secretary-treasurer of the NCAA, said tonight
the recommendations of the Council would be submitted to the 46th
annual convention of the NCAA at Cincinnati, O., January 9-12.
COMMISSIONERS of the ten major college conferences have been
invited to meet with the Council as observers, Wilson said. Wilson
represents the Western Conference as commissioner.
The NCAA council is composed of representatives of the
eight districts of the Association, seven members appointed from
the membership at large and the president and secretary of the
Association. Hugh C. Willett, Southern California, is president.
Members of the council at their last meeting in August unani-
inously adpoted a resolution which declared that the chief pressures
"which have created the alarming trend of overemphasis (in football)
is the unsatiable demand of patrons for winning teams and the
tendency to glorify unduly the capable athlete."
in Ann Arbor
508 E. Williams
ee Duke Ellington,
King Cole Trio and

Favorite Son
Offers Taft
Competition
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. -()-
Gov. Earl Warren of California
yesterday became the second
avowed candidate for the 1952 Re-
publican presidential nomination.
The 1948 GOP nominee for vice-
president said he would permit
state party leaders, who last week
urged him to run, to enter his
name in the California primary.
He will decide later about cam-
paigning in other states.
* * *
WARREN JOINED Sen. Robert
A. Taft (R-Ohio) as a declared Re-
publican candidate.
He stressed party unity in the
statement he read to newsmen.
The 60-year-old Warren, Cal-
ifornia's first three-term gov-
ernor, declared: "There must,
for the welfare of our country,
be a change in national admin-
istration, but if this is to be, the
Republican party must present a
definite constructive and work-
able program for the nation. We
cannot hope to win solely on the
mistakes of the present 20-year
administration, many though
they are."
"There is no time to disagree on
small things or to break up on the
rocks of personal interest," he
said.
"There is a great field for so-
lid agreement and solid accom-
plishment among Republicans
without sacrificing the principles
or conscience of anyone. I shall
try to be helpful in this regard."
Anti-Warren Republicans are
making plans to battle the gover-
nor at the GOP primary with an
unrestricted slate of delegates.
IT SEEMS altogether likely
that the greatest vote-getter in
the history of his state will go to
the GOP national convention next
June with the votes of the 70-
member California delegation in
his pocket.
Taft apparently will steer clear
of California.
Sen. Richard M. Nixon, (R-
Calif.) described Warren in Boston
Tuesday night as the "strongest
dark horse." Some think his best
chance lies in the possibility of a
deadlock between Taft and Gen.
Dwight D. Eisenhower, who has
not announced his presidential in-
tentions.
COMING FRIDAY

Taft Says Truman Puts
Politics Ahead of Peace

WASHINGTON-()-Sen. Taft
(R-Ohio) has accused President
Truman of putting "all kinds of
political and policy considera-
tions" ahead of his interest in
liberty and peace.
Taft also said in a book out yes-
terday that the Truman Adminis-
tration's State Department is
"hostile" toward Congress and its
other executive departments- are
reaching out for more and more
power.
* * *
"IF THE present trend contin-
ues, it seems to me obvious that
the President will become a com-
plete dictator in the entire field
of foreign policy and thereby ac-
quire power to force upon Congress
all kinds of domestic policies which
mustnecessarily follow." he de-
clared.
As a candidate for the 1952
Republican nomination for pres-
ident, Taft aired his views in
a book entitled "A Foreign Po-
licy for Americans."
In an evident attempt to meet
charges that he is an "isolation-
ist," Taft rote:
"While defense of this country
is our first consideration, I do not
agree with those who think we
can completely abandon the rest
of the world and rely solely upon
the defense of this continent.
"In fact, the very thesis of an
effective control of sea and air
by free nations requires that we
Wentworth
Funeral Rites
To BeHeld
Funeral services for Martha A.
Wentworth, housemother at Victor
Vaughan women's residence and
former instructor in the music
school, will be held at 10:30 a.m.
tomorrow at the Muehling Chapel.
Mrs. Wentworth, who was pre-
viously housemother at Gamma
Phi Beta sorority, died after a
long illness at St. Joseph's Mercy
Hospital Tuesday night. She was
67 years old.
A graduate of the music school,
Mrs. Wentworth received a mas-
ters degree in fine arts here in
1940. She was a past president of
the Michigan Federation of Music
Clubs and a member of Mu Phi
Epsilon, honorary musical sorority.

I

Sarah Vaughn at

do interest ourselves in Europe
and the Near East and North
Africa and the Far East, so that
Communist influence may not
extend to areas from which it
is still possible to exclude it by
many methods other than land
armies."
He said the threat of Russian
aggression "has become so serious
today that in defense of the liberty
and peace of the people of the
United States, I think we are jus-
tified in extending economic and
military aid to many countries,
but only when it can be clearly
shown in each case that such aid
will be an effective means of com-
batting Communist aggression."
TAFT'S FOREIGN policy views
brought sharp criticism from Sen.
McMahon (D-Conn.), a Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
member who supports the Admin-
istration.
In a statement analyzing the
Taft book, McMahon said the
Ohioan's "basic difficulty is that
he is still an isolationist," and
added: "He is still the same
man who said in 1940: 'War is
even worse than a German vic-
tory. He fails utterly to relate
the peace and liberty of our own
people to the peace and liberty
of other parts of the world.
"He would have us put a ceiling
price on our liberty and shop for
security at the bargain counter."
McMahon called the book "es-
sentially negative and defeatist."
On the other hand, he praised the
administration program that Taft
assailed.
"The facts are," McMahon said,
"that despite the Kremlin drive
for expansion, the true result of
the Administration's policy is that
it has stopped Soviet expansion
in every area of the world which
Russia did not occupy with its
own troops during World War II."
Defense Gives
Appeal Issue
No Comment
Defense attorneys for three
youths convicted on in u r d e r
charges in Circuit Court Tuesday
waived comment yesterday on
whether they would seek an ap-
peal.
F o r mn e r Washtenaw County
Prosecutor Albert J. Rapp, who de-
fended David L. Royal, one of the
trio which participated in the
robbery-slaying of Nurse Pauline
A. Campbell, said he would not
make a decision until after the
Dec. 4 sentencing of the teen-
agers.
* 4
RALPH C. KEYES, attorney for
William R. Morey, could not be
reached for comment but his law
office reported he had no state.
ment to make at present.
Jacob Max Pel's counsel, Yp-
silanti lawyer Alfred T. DeOtte,
refused comment on both the
question of appeal and the out-
come of the trial.
The jury returned first degree
murder verdicts for Morey and
Pell at the end of the ten-day
trial. Royal was convicted of mur-
der in the second degree.
Rapp said he felt "the verdict
was not in accordance with evi-
dence in the case." le added that
some of the jurors agreed with his
defense arguments because of re-
ports that half the panel held out
for a manslaughter rap foreRoyal
before unanimity was reached.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24.-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST - Boy's red cashmere sweater.
Please call 2-4401-219 Adams. )50L
FOR SALE
HEADQUARTERS for Levis - Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington St. Open 'til
6 p.m. 13
BABY PARAKEETS and canaries; young
male dog, half German Short hair
pointer. 562 S. Seventh St. 4
DON'T BE CAUGHT giftless for Xmas.
Go to Burr-Pats now. 1209 S. "U". )5
FLUTE-A-1 condition. Reasonably pric-
ed. Call 222 Adams, 2-4401. )69
GRAFLEX CAMERA, Model 3A, with
special flash gun and roll film adapt-
ers, carryin gcase, meter, tripod, etc.
Priced for quick sale. Call 3-0521,
Ext. 444 after 7 p.m. )56
BABY PARAKEETS, singing canaries
and house plants. Mrs. Ruffins. 562
S. i4eventh St.)4
MAGAZINES
Over 1,000 kinds. Phone for free list
of X'mas specials. Student Periodical
Agency, 2-8242 (to 10 p.m.).
RECORD PLAYER with Webster Chi-
cago automatic cnahger, and ampli-
fier with speaker in wall baffle. Priced
for quick sale. 3-0521, Ext. 444. )67
BOMBER JACKETS $9.95. Satin twill,
quilt lining, water repellent. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. )3
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE four-room suite for 3-5
men. 1402 Hill. Call after 5:30 p.m.
)1R
DESIRABLE ROOM for 1 to 2 women
wishing quiet home-like atmosphere.
Private bath, many privileges. Wash-
tenaw, near campus. Ph. 2-9308. )10F
ROOMS FOR RENT
STUDENT to share apartment with
Grad, students. Modern kitchen, gas
heat, continuous hot water. Student
landlord. Call 3-1791 before 10:30 a.m.
27R
DOUBLE-SUITE close to campus and
union. Men workers or student.
Shower, automatic hot , water. $5.50
weekly. 509 S. Divisiou near Jefferson.
)9R
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
SINGLE & DOUBLE ROOMS for women
over 21. Laundry and kitchen facili-
ties, 312 So. Thayer. )28P
BUSINESS SERVICES -

BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERT TYPING. Reasonable rates. 329
S. Main. Phone 3-4133 or 29092 eve-
nings. ) 8B
TYPING-Reasonable rates. Ph. 3-4040.
)16B
TYPING (experienced) - Theses, term
papers, stencils. Phone 7590, 830 S,
Main. )6B
DRESSMAKING, tailoring, alterations,
accurate fittings. Quick service. Phone
9708. )13B
PERSONAL
MODERN Beauty Shop -- Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ma-
chineless or cold wave, $5.00, shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1.00. Hair-
cut $1.00. Phone 8100. )13P
THE BEST in Diamond Engagement
and Wedding Rings at wholesale
prices. Ph. 2-1809 evenings. L. E.
Anger. )15P
FULL EVENING of entertainment at
girls' expense Ohio State weekend.
Call Judy and Arlene, 9319. )16P
WILL GIRL who has Marshall Hershon's
pin please return it immediately? Call
7039. )16P
ATTENTION! One plump masochistic
turkey, in possession of three male
grad students, desires to be annihi-
lated by three eligible women with
own cooking facilities-objective: one
delightful Thanksgiving dinner. Call
Tom 9509. )19P
HELP WANTED
MUST BE EXPERIENCED - Women's
better apparel and ready-to-wear. Ex-
cellent conditions, topearnings, steady
or part time. Hospitalization, paid
vacations. Reply Box 2, Mich. Daily
or phone S. Davis, Detroit, WA 8-9821.
)24H

THE UNIVERSITY High School Sen-
iors present "Poison Pen" by Richard
Llewellyn Friday and Saturday, Nov.
16th and 17th at 8:30 p.m. in the
Schorling Auditorium. Student tick-
ets are 40c, adult tickets 60c. ) 10M

TODAY'S the last day of the campus
election when your vote can lead SL,
toward perfection. Student Leg. pow-
er you must promote, so get to a
ballot box and vote! )9M
Feature at
1:31-4:07-6:43-9:21 P.M.
65e to 5P.M.
95c after 5

--Playing thru Saturday-
THE PULITZER PRIZE PLAY:
of New Orleans' Famed Latin Quarter]
1 I

4

HELP WANTED 3
SALESMAN-Experienced preferred, part
time for clothing. shoes. Apply in~
person or by letter. Give hours. Do
not phone. Good pay. Open till 6 p.m.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )2311
WAITERS and fountain help. 3 to 4
evenings a week 9 to 12. Wolverine
Den. 1311 S. University. )271,
RESEARCH ASSISTANT - Full time -
training in biology and chemistry re-
quired. Contact Dr. Markert at 3101
Natural Soience.
WANTED-Fellow to work in kitchen$
Free meals. Cali 2-3191. )2SH
WANTED-Every student to vote in the
all-campus election. )30H
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Ride to New York City for
Thanksgiving. Share expenses. Ph.
3029 Alice Lloyd. )10T4
MISCELLANEOUS

C

.4

Hill Auditorium, Nov. 15
Get their latest LP
releases here at
Lyon & Healy
SARAH VAUGHAN

I

-I
I I
A Steetar
Vivien Marlon
LEIGH -"BRANDO
Coming Sunday
"THE DAY
THE EARTH

t

I

Sarah Vaughan Songs.. .. .Col. CL-6133
ELLINGTON
Duke Ellington's Greatest Vic. LPT-1004
Liberian Suite......... .Col. CL-6073
Masterpieces. ......... . Col. ML-441 8
Mood Ellington..... .....Col. CL-6024
KING COLE
At the piano.,...........Cap. H-156
Trio--Harvest of Hits..... .Cap. H-213

$3.00

TODAY -- FRI. - SAT.

M

TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -'
Sales, rentals, and service. M rrill's,
314 S. State st. !3B
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
als at Office Equipment Co. 215 E.
Liberty. )4B

.STOOD STILL"
Read Daily Classifieds

$4.19
$3.00
$5.45
$3.00

I

rr"

ro

lose ITURB1 ith
Ethel BARRY MCRE
KEENAN VWyNN
1. IAROUNAI I LES f l *r U M W
tNOMAS GOMEL * MARM9IE REHOOS
nt mredcing
NI LI

'x:

r

I

iI

r-Thurs., Nov. 15-TWO SHOWS--7 P.M. & 9:15 P.M.
NAT
"KING" CL..t
AND: :r ;
N E RIO

,..

Trio, Vol. 1..........
Trio, Vol. 2..........
Trio, Vol. 4........ .

....Cap. H-220
.... Cap. H-59
... .Cap. H-177

$2.98
$2.98
$2.98
$2.98
$2.98

i
f

(

WITH AN ALL-STAR VARIETY SHOW

Usual Exceptional
Cinema Miniatures

Plus
The Explosive Comedy
"EXCUSE MY DUST"
with
RED SKELTON

SEATS NOW ON SALE! BOX OFFICE HILL AUDITORIUM-Hours 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.
PRICES: MAIN FLOOR $2.40, FIRST BALCONY $1.80,
SECOND BALCONY $1.20, TAX INCLUDED. .ALL SEATS RESERVED.
SPONSORSHIP: Conger Group of Micbigan Alumnae for benefit of student aid.

Li

.... II

I/'eciv'd4 77ui4OWeek
DON GIOVANNI: A new shipment of Mozart's great opera for those who
were disappointed last week.
One of the finest operatic recordings ever made Vic. LCT 6101

now available on Long Playing records.

17.16

0

WAGNER: MUSIC FROM TRISTAN AND ISOLDE
Stokowski and His Orchestra.

LM 1174
5.72

CINMA .G"ILD and
La Sociedad
Hispanica
present
JOHN HUSTON'S
THE TREASURE OF
SIERRA MADRE
with
HUMPHREY BOGART
WALTER HUSTON

ALAN

VILLIERS

WOLF: DER CORREGIDOR URLP 208
Comic Opera about the Governor.and the Miller's Wife 17.85
STRAVINSKY: PETROUCHKA ML 4438
New York Philharmonic-Dimitri Mitropoulos conducting ..5.45

I

BRAHMS: VARIATIONS ON A HAYDN THEME
BEETHOVEN: SYMPHONY NO. 1
Orchestras under Toscanini
MOZART: PIANO CONCERTI
Balsam and Winterthur Symphony

Sail to Adventure with

LCT 1023
5.72

"THE QUEST OF THE SCHOONER ARGUS"
A Thrilling Film of the Sea

II

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11

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