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November 14, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-14

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t

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1951

I __________________________________

GHOSTS ROMP TONIGHT:
Ruddigore To Open Four Night Stand
. 0 0 0

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
"Ruddigore" will open at 8 p.m.
today.
Spirits undampened by weather,
members of the Gilbert and Sulli-
van Society will begin a four night
stand in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
A cast of more than fifty people
will cavort through the gay satire,
which features a bevy of charac-
ters and a host of ghosts all in-
termingled in the authors' livliest
fashion
THE PLOT, which traces the
misfortunes of a baron who has
to commit a crime a day in order
to fulfill a family curse, and the
amours of his not-too faithful
sweetheart, provides an excuse for
some rollicking singing and danc-
ing in the province of Ruddigore.
Many of the songs will be
familiar to Gilbert and Sulli-
van enthusiasts, but the dances
executed throughout the pro-
duction wil provide some rarely
seen entertainment f o r the
audience.
The dance routines based on
three historical dances, the gal-
liard, the gravotte, and the sailor's
hornpipe. The galliard and the
gravotte both date back to pre-
Renaissaince Europe, and were
first described in a book, "Orches-
ographie" published in 1588.
* * *
A HIGHLY intricate dance, the
galliard began as a racuous form
of entertainment in the late fif-
teenth century. By the time "Or-
chesographie" was printed, it had
been refined to a court dance.
Today, variations of the dance
can be found in the popular
West Virginia Shag, the Bunny
Hop and the Mexican Hat dance.
The gavotte held sway with the
minuet in court circles during its
eminency. Executions of the horn-
pipe can still be seen in many
parts of Europe.
Tickets for "Ruddigore" can still
be obtained at the Mendelssohn
box office. They are $1 and 75
cents apiece.

Campus
Calendar 1
Events Today
COLLOQUIUM - Prof. Leslie
White, chairman of the anthorpo-
logy department, will speak on
"The Role of Technology and Cul-
tural Change" in the second meet-
ing of the Sociology Colloquium at
4:10 p.m. in the East Conference
Room of the Rackham Building.
MOVIES-Two movies, "Austra-
lia-Sheep Ranch Country" and
"Slovakia-Farms and Towns" wll
be shown by the University Exten-
sion Service and Audio-Visual
Educational Center at 4:15 p.m. in
Kellogg Auditorium.
'4 * *
LECTURE - Arthur Mosher,
principal of Allahabad Agricultur-
al Institution of India will speak
at 4 p.m. today at the First Pres-
byterian Church, under the spon-
sorship of the Westminster Guild.
* * *
Coming Events
GEOGRAPHY - "The Signifi-
cance of Global Geography in Our
Times" will be discussed by Col.
William L. Todd, chairman of the
air science and tactics department,
at 7:45 p.m. tomorrow in the Un-
ion. The meeting will be sponsored
by the Beacon association.
* * *
CRIB-George Edwards, former
president of the Detroit City Coun-
cil, will be principal speaker at a
meeting of the Michigan Crib So-
ciety at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the
Union.
*, * *
LECTURE - Prof. Murray J.
Barbour of the music school at
Michigan State College will appear
as guest lecturer, speaking on
"Problems of Temperament and
Tuning," at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
* '4 *
CONCERT-Alexander Brailow-
ski, celebrated Russian pianist, will
present a Choral Union Concert at
8:30 p.m. Friday in Hill Auditor-
ium.
Students Cast
BallotsToaday
(Continued from Page 1)

Prep Course
In Military
Questioned
Robert O. Winder's objection to
taking Ann Arbor High School's
military orientation course has
caused Superintendent of Schools
Otto W. Haisley to question con-
tinuance of the course as a re-
quired program.
Winder, a 17-year-old high
school senior who was last week
refused permission to graduate
unless he took the course, has not
yet made a formal appeal to the
Board of Education to reverse the
school officials' decision.
* * *
HOWEVER, THE board is now
studying the matter. The main
issues as Haisley outlined them
are:
1. Should Winder be excused
from the class?
2. Should the class be continued
as a required course?
Winder objected to the course
last week on grounds that it was
"military indoctrination." Hais-
ley, to the contrary, feels that the
one-hour-a-week lecture class
serves to inform the students of
opportunities offered by the var-
ious branches of military service.
Jury Convicts
Three Youths
Of Murder
(Continued from Page 1)

Engineering Essay Contest To Open

Engineers with literary talent
wil have a chance to win prizes
of $300 and $150, the Engineering
Scholarship Committee announced
today.
Plans for the second annual
Mortimer E. Cooley Memorial En-
gineering Essay contest have been
revealed by Prof. Henry W. Mill-
er, chairman of the scholarship
committee.
* *.*
SUBJECT FOR THE competi-
tion essays will be "The Social
Responsibilities of the Engineer."
This was also last year's topic.
Essays should run in length from
3,000 to 4,000 words, said Colonel
Miller.
This subject was chosen to
comply with the wishes of the
late Dean Cooley, who died in
1944 at the age of 89, leaving a
fund to carry on the contest.
Dean Cooley, believing that en-

gineers and scientists did not ac-
cept enough responsibility outside
their professional activities, stipu-
lated in his will that the funds
were to be used for prizes "to pro-
mote the interest of the engineer-
i n g students in nontechnical
fields."
* * *
WINNER OF FIRST prize last
year was Richard H. Varian, a
June graduate. Second place went
to Henry V. Knight, '53E and third
place to Gordon E. Saxon, '52E.
The contest deadline is April
1, 1952. Carbon copies of the
entries are being requested this
year to facilitate publication of
the winners in "The Michigan
Technic."
Contestants may consult mem-
bers of the scholarship committee
or any engineering English de-
partment member on contest mat-
ters, Prof. Miller said.

All essays must be typewritten
and double-spaced. Numbers will
be assigned to contestants, and
only the number should appear on
the finished essay.
Judges will be Prof. Carl E.
Burklund of the engineering Eng-
lish department, Prof. Charles B.
Gordy of the mechanical engineer-
ing department and Prof. Alfred
H. White of the chemical engi-
neering department.
Union To Resell
NU Game Tickets
Tickets for Saturdays game with
Northwestern will be bought and
sold between 3 and 5 p.m. today
through Friday in the Union Stu-
dent offices and from 9 a.m. to
noon, Saturday in the lobby ticket
booth.

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RUDDIGORE CAPERS-Carole Anderson (Mad Margaret) and
Dave Tolan (Despard) go through one of the many dance rou-
tines which enliven "Ruddigore." The Gilbert and Sullivan oper-
etta will open a four night stand at 8 p.m. today in Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.

.4

Sperry To Speak
On Medical Ethics
William S. Sperry, Dean of the
Harvard Divinity School, wlil
speak on "Some Problems in Medi-
cal Values and Human Ethics" at
the opening of the Roger S. Mor-
ris Lectures in medicine at 8 p.m.
today in Kellogg Auditorium.

Post-Grad Job
Applications
Due Friday
The Bureau of Appointments
has announced that Friday is the
last day that students graduating
in February will be able to apply
for post-graduation jobs.
Although registration will re-
open Jan. 15, the Bureau has cau-
tioned that, due to the length of
time needed to compile a stu-
dent's record, they are unable to
provide jobs for such late appli-
cants.
Job applications blanks may be
obtained at Rm. 3528, Admin. Bldg.

Instructing the Jury yester-
day afternoon, Circuit Judge
James R. Breakey, Jr., pointed
out that a first-degree verdict
should be forthcoming only if
there was "malicious intent" in-
volved in the act.
"Although there is no excuse for
drunkenness," the judge said, "it
should be considered in determin-
ing whether or not an intent could
be formulated.
The verdict came at 9:40 p.m.
in a tense, hushed atmosphere.
Only sounds in the courtroom
after the foreman's quiet pro-
nouncement were the sobs of
the defendants' mothers.
Sentencing of the youths will
take place Dec. 4. Defense attor-
neys did not say immediately
whether they would appeal the
case.

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highest voting turnout percent-
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A costly typographical error in
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Keith Beers, 152E, -
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