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September 25, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1-

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

4

Journalism Teachers Named

Bruce Westly, formerly an as-
sistant professor at the University
of Wisconsin journalism school,
r will teach editing and copywrit-
ing in the journalism department,
it was announced yesterday.
advanced psychology degree here.
The community newspaper
course, previously taught by
Prof. Joseph Howell, will be
handled by Ink White, editor

and publisher of the St. Johns
Clinton Co u nt y Republican
News.
Karl Zeisler, staff writer for
the Monroe Evening News, will
replace deceased P r o f. Donal
Haines in the magazine writing
course, and will also teach special-
ized reporting and editorial writ-
ing.

Rushing
Students wishing to register
for fraternity rushing may do
so from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. any
day this week in the Union
lobby, Pete Thorpe, '53, Inter-
fraternity Council Rushing
Chairman, announced yester-
day.

'U' Singers GREAT EXPECTATIONS:
Have Choice Phoenix Dri'

ves for Full-Scale Status

MUSICIANS-ACTORS-COMEDIANS-ACROBATS-SEALS

AUDITION NOW FOR

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Audition at Harris Hall
Sunday, September 30-2-5:30 P.M.
Sunday, October 7-2-5:30 P.M.

And in addition-by appointment: Call3-151 1ext.21 14
(Sponsored by University Bands)

i

__r
'FRESH AS A BREATH OF SPRING"

Of Choirs
By CARA CHERNIAK
Students with vocal talent have
many different campus groups to
choose from this year, including
the University Choir, the Arts
Chorale, the Michigan Singers, the
Tudor Singers, the University
Choral Union and the Men's and
Women's Glee Clubs.
The University Choir, directed
by Prof. Maynard Klein of the
music school, is divided into three
sections. The complete choir
group also includes an advanced
male graduate and staff group who
will rehearse every Thursday.
THE FIRST group of the choir,
all women, will rehearse at 3 p.m.
Monday and Wednesday in Lane
Hall. The second group of both
men and women, the training sec-
tion of the choir, will rehearse at
7 p.m. Thursday and at 3 p.m.
Friday in Lane Hall.
The Michigan singers, actual-
ly the third group of the choir,
specializes in sacred musicand
art songs of all the great periods
of choral production, and will
meet today and Thursday at 3
p.m. in Lane Hall.
Those joining the University
Choir donot necessarily have to
take it for credit, Prof. Klein said.
All those interested in this ar-
rangement may contact him in
Rm. 706 Burton Tower. Among
the planned works this semester
are the Bruckner Mass in E Minor
and the Faur6 Requiem.
ALSO UNDER the direction of
Prof. Klein is the Arts Chorale
which does a lighter type of con-
cert music and meets one day a
week. The first rehearsal will be
held at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Lane
Hall.
The Tudor Singers, a group
specializing in ancient and Ren-
aissance period music, will not
be organized until next week.
This group sings for the Pole-
giumMusicum, a graduate group
that presents ancient programs.
One of the oldest groups on
campus is the University Choral
Union under the direction of Les-
ter McCoy of the music school.
This group, consisting of students,
faculty, and townspeople, will pre-
sent two performances of the Mes-
siah at Christmastime, and two
choral works with the Philadel-
phia Symphony Orchestra during
May Festival.
Auditions for the group will con-
tinue from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. to-
day and tomorrow in Rm. 111 Hill
Auditorium. Rehearsals will be
held every following Tuesday eve-
ning.
Entering upon its 94th season
will be the Men's Glee Club,
under the direction of Prof.
Philip Duey of the music school.
Activities of this group include
concert tours, radio and tele-
vision broadcasts and recordings.
Tryouts for the Glee Club will
be held at 7:15 p.m. today in the
Union ballroom. Subsequent re-
hearsals will be held at 7:15 p.m.
in Rm. 3G of the Union for those
who attend today.
Women's Glee Club tryouts
will be held from 4 to 5 p.m. to-
(Continued on Page 8)

By HARLAND BRITZ
"The coming year should see
the Phoenix Project attain full-j
scale status," according to Dean
Ralph Sawyer of the graduate
school and the project's director.
Reporting in the latest Phoenix
progress report, D e a n Sawyer
notes that more than $750,000
should be spent on the project
during 1951-52. The Dean also
points torseveral significant re-
sults of recent Phoenix research
on atomic energy.
AT THE PRESENT time 17 in-
dividual research projects are un-
der way and they are already be-
ginning to produce results and
publications. Under these grants
University researchers are work-
ing in such diversified fields as
zoology and political science.
To keep pace with the Uni-
versity's increasing activity in
nuclear research, the Phoenix
Project Laboratory, formerly
known as the "Hot Laboratory,"
will increase its activity in the
field of radioactivity.
Planning for the new Phoenix
Project Memorial Building is also
under way, the report points out.
The plans will include "distinc-
tive memorial features and labor-
atories for high intensity and
other radiation experiments not
conveniently carried on in other
University laboratories and build-
ings,
THE REPORT adds that it is

<t

likely that the building will be
erected on the new research cam-
pus planned north of the Huron
River and adjacent to the pro-
p o s e d Engineering Research
Building. ,
Because of the large amount
of interest on this campus in
the field of nuclear research,
the United States Atomic En-

* * * *

* * * a
ergy Commission has sent many
large projects to the University
and work on these contracts is
now under way.

Other special stuWdes thal have
been launched include one, on
plant growth processes with the
use of radioactive techniques, an-
other on industrial medicine,
health and safety and still an-
other on community development,
resource management and utiliza-
tion.
The planning committee has
also okayed a grant for next
year of $25,000 to the Survey
Research Center for study of
the impact of atomic energy
upon the American public. An
other grant of $25,000 to the
Law School will be used to
study the legal implications
of the Atomic Energy Act.
Significant progress has al-
ready been made on several Phoe-
nix research projects. Studies
this summer in food preservation
through the use of radioactive
materials "point clearly to im-
portant commercial uses for the
by-products of the atomic bomb."
Another study in the Physics
department makes it possible to
reasonably determine the age of
pre-historic organic materials
through the use of the Carbon-14
technique.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results
TIlE IG SWING IS TO
TIlE BAL COLLAR

Dean Sawyer's report f also notes
a $100,000 pledge by friends of
the late Dean Alice Lloyd as a
memorial fund to support re-
search under the auspices of the
Phoenix Project.

BOXED-UP ISOTOPES-By protecting the worker from radia-
tion, this "Berkeley" box aids in analysis of the nuclear reactions
which take place in the University cyclotron, an investigation
forming an important phase of the Phoenix Project's work.

Police Begin
New Patrol
(Continued from Page 1)
of 48 hours shall be considered
abandonment, and the vehicle may
be towed away under the direc-
tion of the Police Department at
the expense of the owner."
Issuance of the permits is under
the direction of the Committee,
which is headed by University Sec-
retary Herbert G. Watkins. In-
quiries concerning permits may be
made at the second floor informa-
tion desk in the Administration
Bldg.

Gargoyle Shouts for Tryouts

First tryout meeting of the
year for Gargoyle, campus humor
magazine, will be 4 to 6 p.m. to-
morrow at the Garg's offices in
the Student Publication Building,
managing editor Peg Nimz has
announced.
With the first edition due to
erupt the campus into a holo-
caust of badgering, bellowing
hawkers late in October, tryouts
are needed for the business, art,
advertising, photography and cdi-
torial staffs.
"Anyone who doesn't fit these
categories, or who just doesn't

fit, is welcome too," Miss Nimz
slyly hollered through her teeth
in t h e time-honored Garg
f ashion.
Entering its forty-fifth year of
publication both on campus and
as an underground enterprise,
Garg has pleased generations of
Michigan students with its dis-
torted mirroring of campus and
national life. This year's first
edition will follow a theme of
"advice to freshmen."
"As an additional bribe to try-
outs-special Gargoyle coffee will
be served," Miss Nimz said.

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