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November 11, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-11

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1951

WOULD-BE POETESS:
Dean Bacon Rechannels Ambition

A7

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:

OSU Eases 'Gag Rule';
General Outcry Raised

By GAYLE GREENE
"Writing poetry comes very eas-
ily to me, yet I have never written
a good poem," Dean Deborah Ba-
con observed yesterday on the
first anniversary of her appoint-
ment to the office of Dean of Wo-
men.
"Fortunately writing is not my
only interest," she added. As a
nurse in the Battle of the Bulge,
at a mission in Alaska and work-
ing with people in the University,
Dean Bacon's varied interests have
lessened her poetic disappoint-
ments.
. . *
"EXCUSE ME while I sign these
letters," she said. "I can do that
without thinking and talk to you.
at, the same time.",
Then she proceeded to sign
the letters in a large rounded
scrawl, saying, "I definitely pre-
fer the classic. I like a sonnet
of fourteen lines. I like organ-
ization. I like organization in
extracurricular activities."
"Come to think of it, this may
be a good time to spout off about
bridge;" she said, as the phone
rang.
"That was a house mother who
seemed worried about some of her
girls going to a coeducational pa-
jama party," she explained. "Oh,
yes,' I was talking about bridge.
You might think that because If
like organization that I would liker
briIge. I, don't. It has become1
as rigid and stylized as Egyptian
art," she said.
"Have you ever passed thei
League on the night of a bridgec
tournament? At first I thought
there was some sort of doctoral
examination being given, but it
turns out that it's only a bridgeI

, * - -

i

-Daily-Bruce Knoll
DEAN DEBORAH BACON
... the pause' that refreshes in the Round-Up Room

* * s
game,". she said, answering the
phone again.
"These phone calls keep coming
all day. They completely mixup
my schedule. By the way, I just
happen to have a copy of today's
schedule here," she added, remov-
ing a small notebook from the
pocket of her smart, teal blue wool
dress.
* * *
"AT 8:45-ARRIVE at office;
9:00-talk to student planning to
withdraw; 9:20--The Daily arrives

* * *
and is read, even the sports column
during the football season. ('I
love football, yell myself hoarse at
every game,' she added.).
"9:30-morning mail arrives;
9:45-phone calls start coming
and don't seem to stop; 10:00-
student in to discuss loan; 11:00
-begin reading morning mail;
11:10-conference with Mrs.
Healy; 11:45-.-signatures.
"12-1:30-lunch with committee
and conference; 1:30 -- b e g i n
morning mail; 2:00-student in to

discuss emotional problem; 2:45-
begin morning mail; 3:00- after-
noon mail arrives; rest of after-
noon-more students, more phone
calls, more conferences; 4:00-fin-
ish morning mail; 5:45-dinner at
student residence; 8:00-speech at'
Lane Hall.'
"Then in between times," the
dean continued, "I like to take
time, out for reading, music and
seeing foreign films."
Even though there isn't much
"in between time," Dean Bacon
still enjoys her job. "I certain-
ly don't object to working with
-women," she said forseeing the
question.
"There are those who say that
women are petty and catty, but
actually they are no more so than
men," she noted. "When I was
overseas during the Battle of the
Bulge there were 40 nurses work-
ing in such close quarters that we
found personal feuds were the
most satisfying way to get over
our boredom. When they started
bringing in the wounded by the
thousands, however, there was no
question about cooperation.
* * *
"MY B.S. DEGREE in Public
Health and a year at Fort Yukon,
Alaska with a missionary hospital
were my preparation for my army
nurse work," Dean Bacon said.
"Then came study at the Sor-
bonne in Paris, Columbia Univer-
sity Graduate school, and my
master's degree in English Litera-
ture. In fact," she concluded, "I
completed my doctoral dissertation
just in time to take office here at
the University last November."
Atomic Bugs.
Aid Washday
A University professor has fig-
ured in a new atomic discovery.
Prof. Gerald M. Ridenour, of
the School of Public Health, is
one of three men who described
yesterday how radioactivity is aid-
ing the Monday wash these days.
Prof. Ridenour and his associ-
ates explained that radioactive
bugs are put into various deter-
gents and soaps. Their activity
helps remove the dirt from the
dirty clothes.
The process was revealed at the
Fifth National Home Laundry
Conference in New York.
Read Daily Classifieds

Hatchers Plan
Fall Functions
President and Mrs. Harlan H.
Hatcher will hold their first open
house of the fall season from 3 to
6 p.m. and from 8 to 10 p.m., Sun-
day, Nov. 18, at the presidential
home.'
Invitations have been extended
to members of the faculty, the
University staff and townspeople.
The first fall tea for University
students will be given at the Hat-
cher home Dec. 5. The teas, initi-
ated by retired president Alexander
G. Ruthven, are open to all mem-
bers of the student body.

By HARLAND BRITZ
Despite a relaxation of the so-
called "gas rule" at Ohio State,
students and professors are still
unhappy over the state of aca-
demic freedom at Columbus.
Last Wednesday President How-
ard L. Bevis relaxed the speakers'
ban by allowing professors, heads
of recognized religious groups and
scientific organizations to invite
speakers without screening.
BUT MOST student groups were

not included and as a result the
chairman of the Indiana psycho-1
logy department, Prof. Douglas G.
Ellson, refused on Friday an in-
vitation to speak before a gradu-
ate fraternity on the Columbus
campus.n
"I just didn't like the idea of
being screened by a private
group before being permitted to
express my opinion," the profes-
sor asserted.
And yesterday a national ,pro-
fessors' organizational meeting in
Chicago also attacked the ban.
The Council of the American As-
sociation of University Profes-sors
adopted a resolution saying that
the action of the OSU trustees
"encroaches on the effectiveness
of the function of a free univer-
sity in a free society."
Next Wednesday, students at
Ohio State will express their
own opinions through a campus
wide referendum. According to
an article by the OSU Daily
Lantern News editor, "their ac-
tion will probably be heavily
against the ruling."
Several student organizations,
headed by the Student Senate,
have already opposed the rule.

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CTumor' Removed at Illinois
The College Tumor, humor publication of the University of Illinois,
has been removed from sale.
Frederick H. Turner, the university's dean of students, request-
ed the halt of sales because of what he described as "obvious lacic
of good judgement" on the part of the publication's editors.
Target of a jesting headline in the latest issue was the Illini foot-
ball team. The banner read: "Team Fired For Cheating. Fighting Illini
Caught Using Exam Ponies."
The newspaper also poked fun at George Stoddard, university
president and several faculty members.
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3
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READ AND USE THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

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I
,"
)\

Sperry T o Speak
On Medical Values
Dr. Willard L. Sperry, dean of
the Harvard Divinity School, will
speak on "Problems in Human
Ethics and Medical Values" at 8
p.m. Wednesday in Kellogg Audi-
torium.
The lecture, co-sponsored by the
Medical School and the Student
Medical Society, will stress the so-
cio-economic problems of the me-
dical profession.
The public is invited.

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