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November 09, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-09

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PAGE SIXB

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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FROM 'M.E." TO 'M.I.'?
Engine Faculty Approves
Change in Dept. Name

Campus Calendar

By MIKE SCHERER
University engineering students
may have to revise their vocabu-
lary as a result of yesterday's en-
gineering college faculty meeting.
The faculty approved a change
in the name of the Department
of Mechanical Engineering to the
"Department of Mechanical and
Industrial Engineering." The
change will now be recommended
to the Board of Regents for offi-
cial action.
MECHANICAL engineering
courses, which every undergradu-
ate engineering student must
take at some time, have always
been referred to by the nickname
"M.E." With "industrial" added

to the department name, a change
in nomenclature may be necessary.
According to Dean George
Granger Brown, a suitable sub-
stitute might be "M.I."
Another motion approved by
the engineering faculty for action
by the Board of Regents was the
establishment of a University
Transportation Institute, which
will offer research opportunities
and special work in fields of mo-
tor, railroad and air transporta-
tion.
* * *
A CHANGE was also approved
in the science admission require-
ment listed in the official engin-
eering college announcement.
The new rule requires, two units
of science, preferably in physics
and chemistry but with alternates
of botany, biology, or zoology for
either one of these. Previously
the physics unit was an essential,
with an alternative only in chem-
istry.
Study Shows
Urban Growth
A recent study by the University
bureau of government has revealed
that Michigan, which has the
greater portion of its metropolitan
population living in unincorpora-
ted areas, depends on the central
city to supply basic urban services
to the surrounding area.
The study, written by. research
assistant Mrs. Betty Tablesan, is
entitled "Governmental Organiza-
tion in Metropolitan Areas."

Events Today
SYMPHONIE PASTORALE -
The SL Cinema Guild and Inter-
Arts Union will present a movie,
"Symphonie Pastorale" at 7:30 and
9:30 p.m. in Hill Auditorium.
'U' MUSEUMS -- Continuing
their fall movie schedule, the Uni-
versity Museums will show "The
Great Lakes-How They Were
Formed" and "Great Lakes" at 7:30
p.m. in Kellogg auditorium.
* * *
MILKY WAY VISIT-Astrono-
my visitors will take a trip to the
Milky Way, via movie, at 7:30 p.m.,
Rm. 3017 of the Angell Hall Ob-
servatory.
* * *
Events Tomorrow
SPEECH CLINIC-A clinic for
high school students interested in
radio will be conducted by the Uni-
versity speech department. Among
the day's activities will be an ac-
tual broadcast of a children's dra-
ma and a sample of announcer
auditions.
* * ,,
HI-Y, TRI-Y CONFERENCE --
A training conference for students
who will atend the Hi-Y, Tri-Y
Legislature later this month will
be held here.
* * *
ACCOUNTANTS MEETING -
The twenty-sixth annual confer-
ence of Michigan Accountants will
be held at 10 a.m. This meeting is
sponsored jointly by the'Michigan
Association of C.P.A. and the
School of Business Administration.

Coming Events
SYMPHONY PERFORMANCE-
The University Symphony Band,
with Edwin Franko Goldman of
the Goldman band in New York as
guest conductor, will present a con-
cert at 4:15 p.m., Sunday,.Dec. 2, in
Hill Auditorium.
* * *
CASE CLUBS-Activities will get
under way for the 16 University
Case Clubs at 4:15 p.m., Monday.
Notices of scheduling for the dif-
ferent cases are posted in the Case
club office on the second floor of
Hutchins Hall.
STANLEY QUARTET-The sec-
ond of the Stanley Quartet con-
certs will be given at 8:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, in Rackham Lecture Hall.
Selections by Mozart, Beethoven
and Bartok will highlight the pro-
gram.
* * *
ARMED FORCES REPORT --
Opportunities for women in the
armed services will be discussed at
an informal seminar at 2 p.m., Fri-
day, Nov. 30. Dean Sarah L. Healy
has announced that this will not
be a recruiting session, but rather
an informative period.

A FLASHING LIGHT, A PUSH OF THE BUTTON-- ANOTHER STEP IN VISION RESEARCH.
* * * * * * * *
Converted Atic cene of Vision Tests

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By GAYLE GREENE
In a darkened attic room of the
West Medical Building, a man and
a woman sit in plush theatre seats
reporting what they see as a series
of lights are flashed on a screen
in front of them.
The lights, barely detectable,
often cannot consciously be seen.
Still they are stimuli to the uncon-
cious mind which says to the sub-
ject, "something just happened,"
and the subject responds by push-
ing a button. This push of the
button is helping to determine the
range of the eye's function.
* * *
BECAUSE OF the complicated
but efficient automatic setup used
in the experiments, the tests can
be conducted by the subjects
themselves. Research assistants,
who are at present pushing but-
tons to indicate when they detect

a flashing light, are guinea pig,
tester and calculator all in one.
The tests are part of an ex-
tensive Vision Research program
of the psychology department in
conjunction with the Office of
Naval Research.
From the statistics gathered in
these tests Prof. H. Richard Black-
well, director of the Vision Lab-
oratory, hopes to determine just
what range of function the hu-
man eye has.
IN A SMALL room beneath the
testing area, intricate machinery
lines the walls and covers two ta-
bles. The first of these has been
named the "ape" by Prof. Black-
well because it takes the place of
a human. Working on the princi-
ples of the player piano, it relays
impulses which control the flash-
ing lights in the upstairs lab.

Your feet are dry . . . your
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ANOTHER MACHINE' records
the "ape's" actions, while a third,
the "counter," tabulates the re-
sults. The counter tabulates in
which of four intervals a light ac-
tually did flash and in which of
these four intervals the subject
indicated that -he thought the
light flashed.
Each experimenter works four
hours pushing buttons a n d
spends the rest of the day cal-
culating the results.
Originally, when these experi-
ments began in 1945 the testees
were not given a "free choice"
(choosing in which of four inter-
vals a light flashed), rathey they
were asked after one interval, "Did
you see anything?" According to
Blackwell, the original method
was much less successful because
there were all kinds of personality
variables. "The subject built up
an expectation and there was a
tendency to say yes at least 50
per cent of the time," he explained.
DURING THE war these experi-
ments, conducted with 50 women
in a former bowling alley on Long
Island, were used to determine the
distances at which enemy objects
could be seen, or at which dis-
tance American ships might be
detected by the enemy.
Further experiments led to the
relieving of one of commercial
aviation's greatest headaches -
airport lighting problems. Test re-
sults brought about increased
safety and decreased expense, as
they revealed that more concen-
trated lights are more effective
than larger ones.

IFC Exchange
Checks Due Soon
The distribution of checks for
books sold at the Interfraternity
Council Book Exchange earlier this
semester will not be completed un-
til a week from today, manager
Norman Thomas, '53, announced
yesterday.
Thomas asked that inquiries
about the books be withheld until
that time.

We leave that to the ladies.
For the males, however, we
suggest the natural comfort
of our Wilton Model).
No "squeeze" to take your
breath away ... but all the
fashion any man could want
from $68.00
VAN BOVEN

Faculty Members, Students
Receive Numerous Honors

Quality Products
Advertised in ife."Post. -Look
Collier's." Country Gentleman
FOR SALE AT
SWI FT'S
DRUG STORE
340 S State St.
YOUR REXALL STORE

University faculty members are
playing a prominent part in the
combined meeting of five scientific
societies this week in Detroit.
Professors Kenneth K. Landes,
E. William Heinrich, James E.
Bever and Kenneth G. Smith, all
of the geology and mineralogy de-
partments will present papers.
Other members of these depart-
ments are on committees for the
aff air.
Another faculty achievement
was recorded this week when di-
rector of the University broad-
casting service Waldo Abbot
was named to the Board of Re.
gional Directors of the National
Association of Education Broad-
casters.
In this role, he will represent
all educational radio stations in
Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio
and Michigan for a two year term.
* * *
PROF. HERBERT E. Miller of
the School of Business Adminis-
tration has recently published a
"C.P.A. Review Manual," covering
many phases of accounting.

Outstanding University women
were presented awards last night
by the Assembly of Independent
Women. Sophomores cited for
their all-A records during 1950-51
were: Ann Stevenson, Shirley
Swinson, June Carol Granstrom,
Helen Beatson and Frances Hill,
Receiving scholastic honors for
the class of '53 were Joyce Winter
and Rita Levine. Seniors Margar-
et Huebshman and Lea Eisner also
received individual honors.

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