100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1951

:,

SPEAKING
ofop
BY GEORGE FLINT
HAMPAIGN-You could have taken a script of last year's snow
bound 7-0 Illinois defeat of Michigan and replayed it yesterday as
y Eliot's team proved once again that it can throw that ball around
slippery weather.
Last year a Norm Major-Tony Klimex pass yielded the only
ni score, coming in the second quarter after an 80-yard drive.
This time they waited until the final period, and a couple
If new faces appeared in the drama. Tommy O'Connell, who
ad done an impressive job of bringing his team down the field-
with a mixture of' passes and quick-opening ground plays, threw
ne to a wide open Rex Smith in the white-coated end zone.
And that was the ball game.
Illinois rooters, who braved 40-mile winds and 27-degree tem-
rature to cheer on their Rose Bowl hopeful team, went wild as
iith squeezed the ball as if it were a new-born babe, looked to see
it he was really in paydirt, and then joyfully tossed the pigskin
the air.
'o Breaks This Time
HE ELEMENTS, which have worked in Michigan's favor in the
past, were just not playing footsie with the Maize and Blue yes-
day.
Snow had been even a greater concomitant in the 9-3 conquest
Ohio State which sent Oosterbaan's men to the Rose Bowl last year.
But Champaign was not Columbus, and it took only a misplaced
ting to turn the tide in one direction or another.
Michigan came up with a variant of its single wing in the early
ges of the contest. It loaded the strong side of the line with five
tead of the usual four men.
This yielded results during the Wolverines' one real threat.
ith Don Peterson, a fullback who seemed to delight in the crys-
alline moisture which covered the hard-packed gridiron, carry-
ng the mail. The Michigan line was able to open gaping holes
ver the right side of the Illini forward wall.
The rugged fullback carried the ball a total of 27 times. He
netd 104 yards on the slippery turf and carried the brunt of the
ack.
Michigan employed a 6-2-2-1 defensive formation throughout
st of the first half. Then, in the second half, they shifted occa-
ally to a 5-3-2-1. The big defensive trouble came against the
ead. That formtaion, which Minnesota employed so effectively
the 54-27 Michigan victory last week, was eminently successful in
Illinois touchdown drive.
* * * *
rouble with Spread Defense
ICHIGAN SPREAD its linebackers and halfbacks to meet the
threat of the wide backs and the ends, who were split as much
ten yards from normal position. But this left weaknesses in the
ddle, and in the fourth-quarter, last-gasp drive of the Illini, quar-
back O'Connell took excellent advantage of it.
The touchdown play was off the spread, too.
End Smith had split wide to the right, with the ever-danger-
ohnny Karras right behind him, expecting a plunge. The Mich-
gan defense pulled in tight, and Smith had room to do a tango
Jr two before receiving the ball.
This was only the 12th time Illinois was able to defeat the Maize
Blue, who have beaten them 25 times. Oddly enough, the two
ms have never tied, although yesterday's close match looked like
othing-across struggle until the Illini eruption in the fading mm-
s.

Purdue . .
Penn State

. 28 Ohio State
. 0 Northwestern

W3 isconsin
0 Indiana

0 ! tJ

Minnes

sota. . 20 Notre Dame
. . . . 20 Navy . . .

. 19 Columbia
.0 Cornell

. . 21
.. 20

oIIowa

Last

Quarter

Rally

Drops

Wolverines

O'Connell-to-Smith Pass
Saves Unbeaten Status

* * 'x

'?

Underdog UCLA Bruins
Upturn Clifornia 27

(Continued from Page 1)
pass for a 23 yard advance and a
first down on the Wolverine 46.
Out of this spread formation
came Illinois once again and
this time O'Connell connected
with hero Smith in the middle
of the Wolverine secondary for
another first down, this one on
the snow-faded 30 yard strip.
Then the right end, Joe Ver-
nasco, made a vitalncontribution
by leaping high in the air to pull
down an O'Connell rifle shot be-
fore tumbling out of bounds at
the 19.
** *
THE ROAR of the crowd
mounted in intensity as the Illini
raced out of the huddle once
again, and as O'Connell took his
position under the cen eruhe
calmly waved his arms for quiet.
As the noise subsided he
handed the ball off to fullback
Bill Tate who smashed up the
middle for 13 precious yards and
a first and goal to go at the six.
With two minutes left, Wolver-
ine line-backer Larry LeClaire
broke into Illini blocking to toss
Pete Bachouros for a two yard
loss to the eight.
THAT SET the stage for O'Con-
nell, who moved his players into
place and executed his perfect,
throw into the heart of a con-
fused Michigan secondary.
Sam Rebecca's conversion pro-
duced an unnecessary extra point
to cap the storybook triumph.
Michigan had made a des-

perate first half touchdown bid
but was unable to win a race
with the clock as the gun sound-
ed with the Wolverines in pos-
session on the enemy seven yard
line.
Tinkham had set the drive in
motion by intercepting an O'Con-
nell toss at the Wolvesine 32 ; nd
running it back to the Illini 46
with 22 minutes remaining in
the half.
i.* "
TAILBACK BILL PUTICH hit
Ted Topor with a perfect ten yard
throw as Topor was shoved out
on the 36. Peterson, who car-
ried Michigan's ground attack all
afternoon, added five yards in two
cracks at the line and a defensive
holding penalty gave the Wolver-
ines a first down on the 23.
Peterson hit the middle for
three and Putich's incomplete
pass stopped the clock with 10
seconds left.
On a bootleg play Putich
whipped around his own right
end and was pushed out of
bounds at the seven, but quar-
terback Topor fumbled the sub-
sequent pass from center as the
half expired.

TOM O'CONNELL
... saves Illini

Michigan set another drive
motion late in the third period,
final serious scoring threat.
, , -

in
its

(Advertisement)
rsonal Christmas
Cards at Follett's
25 outstanding lines at Fol-
's, State St. at N. University,
caused quite a stir among the
ly shoppers. The quality of the
ction is at its finest. Students
ticularly should order them

LATE HOCKEY SCORES
Detroit 3, Montreal 2
New York 2, Toronto 1.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Boilermakers
Blank Penn St.
LAFAYETTE, Ind.-W)-Purdue
broke a three-game football losing
streak yesterday by cutting up
Penn State's defense with a gang
of unknown sophomores a n d
freshmen.
Sophomore Max Schmaling, sub
fullback, scored the first two Pur-
due touchdowns in the 28-0 vic-
tory.
Quarterback D a 1 e Samuels
was the only starting regular in
Purdue's injury-riddled back-
field. He threw two touchdown
passes to Jim Whitmer, but Pur-
due's youngsters already had
more than enough points to
win.
Freezing cold and snow-filled
gusts of wind up to 45 miles an
hour caused frequent fumbles.
Penn State lost the ball three
times in fumbles, once on the Pur-
due 8, but it recovered four Pur-
due fumbles.
TENNESSEE 27, NORTH
CAROLINA 0
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.-('P)-Hank
Lauricella, Tennessee's potent lit-
tle butcher knife, passed and
flashed North Carolina into sub-
mission 27-0 today to extend the
winning streak of the nation's
number one football team to 16
games.

STARTING FROM their own
eight, the Wolverines ate up big
chunks of yardage, mostly on Pet-
erson's powerful plunges. The
courageous full back picked up a
first down on the Illini 40 just af-
ter the final period began.
Wingback Wes Bradford col-
lected three yards on a reverse
and then the Michigan attack
collapsed when Putich's pass
down the eastern sideline in-
tended for Bradford was inter-
cepted by Al Brosky at the Illi-
nois 18.
The rest of the game was a duel
of punts and fumbles, with the
Wolverines coming out on the
short end of both, although the
losers seemed to have better com-
mand of the situation when in
possession of the ball, until the
final six minutes.
O'CONNELL AND Smith, of
course, were the game's offensive
big guns. They saved their fin-
esse for the crucial stages and
performed like champions.
the Wolverines with a Big Ten
mark of three victories against
It was Michigan's third defeat
in six games this season, and left
one setback.
Statistics
Micig*

Plenty-Passing
Packers Play
Hosts to Lions
GREEN BAY, Wis.-(R)--Green
Bay's pass-happy packers enter-
tain the Detroit Lions in a Nation-
al Football League game today
with a first division berth at stake.
The Packers, who have thrown
and completed more passes than
any other club in the league, go
into the game with a 3-2 record.
Detroit, rated in pre-season fore-
casts as the team to beat, hasn't
won a game in a month and is
lugging a 2-2-1 slate. The loser
today will drop out of National
Conference contention.
Lion Coach Buddy Parker has
reshuffled his front line in an at-
tempt to bolster an attack which
has failed to produce a victory
since Oct. 7, but has indicated he'll
stand on his regular backfield of
Bobby Layne, Doak Walker, Bob-
by Hoernschemyer and Pat Harder.
Green Bay's aerial offense, which
has outgained its ground attack
nearly three to one, will be han-
dled by Tobin Rote and Bobby
Thomason alternating at quarter-
back.

LOS ANGELES-(P)-The UCLA
football team blasted some more
shine off the glittering Golden
Bears of California yesterday, up-
setting the heavily favored visi-
tors, 21-7, in one of the nation's
biggest surprises.
Led by a sensational sopho-
more tailback, Paul Cameron,
thrice beaten UCLA handed the
big brother Bears theirs second
setback of the season. It also
was Cal's second loss in 41 regu-
lar season contests stretching
back to 1947.
Outplaying the bigger, power
laden Bears in every department,
and gaining revenge for their
coach, Red Sanders, for the 35-0
walloping inflicted on them last
year, UCLA broke a 7-7 deadlock
in the third quarter and clinched
the decision with a third touch-
down in the final period.
California went into the game,
a Pacific Coast Conference en-
counter watched by 56,418 fans
gathered under warm skies, as a
solid two touchdown favorite.
NOTRE DAME 19, NAVY 0
BALTIMORE-(P)-Notre Dame
and Navy spent most of the time
smearing each other in the mud
of Memorial Stadium here yester-
day, but the Irish long distance
scoring paid off with a 19-0 vic-
tory over the Midshipmen.
It took the Irish only 55 sec-
onds for two touchdowns in the
second quarter. Bill Barrett,
senior speedball from River
Forest, Ill., went 74 yards on a
punt return in the matter of
several seconds in the fourth
quarter.
Navy had the full house of 44,-
237 chilled fans on their feet at
the end of the game when it failed
to crash over the goal one yard
away on the last play.
Navy had only one other
scoring opportunity in the game,
and it fumbled that away on
the Notre Dame 10 in the third
quarter.
Except for the Irish lightning
scores, a fighting Navy line and
the slop of Memorial Stadium
combined to keep Notre Dame at
bay. Navy got nowhere at all
in the first half, winding up with
a loss of three yards. Notre Dame

Ci

didn't do much better in the
second half, carrying the ball past
midfield only once.
* * *
STANFORD 21, WASHINGTON '
STATE 13
PALTO ALTO, Calif. - () -
Stanford's unbeaten Indians, tra-
veling football's victory highway
toward the Pacific Coast Confer-
ence title and the Rose Bowl,
wrote their toughest win into the
record today by defeating Wash-
ington State's Cougars 21 to 13.
A crowd of 49,000 fans, sit-
ting in summer-like weather,
saw the red shirted Indians
score touchdowns in each of the
first three periods, then get
scored upon twice in the final
quarter.
Stanford chalked up its seventh
victory of the season in beating
the rugged, ever-threatening Cou-
gars from the north. The victory
was doubly impressive in the fact
that Washington State up to yes-
terday had scored not less than 21
points per game against six pre-
vious opponents.
The inspired Indians made their
youthful coach, Chuck Taylor, a
prophet for the seventh time. He
has predicted a winning effort be-
fore every game.
Big Ten
Standings
W L T Pct.
Illinois ......... 3 0 0 1.000
MICHIGAN ..... 3 1 0 .750
Wisconsin ...... 3 1 1 .700
Ohio State......2 1 1 .625
Purdue.... 1 1 0 .500
Northwestern.. 1 2 0 .333
Indiana .......1 3 0 .250
Minnesota ...... 0 2 1 .167
Iowa ............ 9 3 1 .125
LOSE THAT LEAN

Hall of Fame
Accepts '11'
Grid Greats
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J.-(P)-
Thirty-two players and 21 coaches
were elected yesterday to the foot-
ball Hall of Fame at Rutgers Uni-
versity,
The selections by the honors
court were the first for the $5,-
000,000 project and chiefly were
of famous figures of the past cen-
tury or early part of the present
era.
NINE OF THE eleven men select-
ed by the nation's sports writers
and sportscasters for the Associat-
ed Press All-Time All America
team were included in the list.
The 32 players chosen included
Adolf "Gsrmany" Shulz, and
Benny Friedman, of Michigan.
The 21 coaches chosen included
Fielding H. Yost, Michigan.
Yale placed four men in the Hall
of Fame to lead the list. Notre
Dame, Michigan, and Iowa were
the only other schools to win re-
cognition for more than one.
Robert Suffridge, Tennessee
guard, and Benny Oosterbaan,
Michigan end, were the two mem-
bers of the AP first team not in
the Rutgers group.
RENT
a typewriter
and keep up
with your work

r. I

-

Former Men of Vaughan House
KELSEY HOUSE (our new Home)
invite you to attend
"NOVEMBER KNIGHT"
A SEMI-FORMAL DANCE
Saturday, November 17, 1951
for further information contact
Phil Agnifilo, 3-0521 Ext 628

First Downs
Rushing Yardage
Passing Yardage
Passes Attempted
Passes Completed
Passes Intercepted
Punts
Punting Average
Fumbles Lost
Yards Penalized

Illinois
11
173
16
z
10
32.5
1
45

Michigan
. 11
165
50
9
3
2
10
28.5
3
15

AQUARIUMS -An ideal cohJe/atioknalpiece.
See our live tropical fish display this weekend
- open every day except Tuesday.
NNERSITY J4QUARIUM
2208 PACKARD

MICHIGAN
LE-PERRY, Green
LT-JOHNSON, Bennet, Balog
LG-KINYON, Dugger, Beison
C-O'SHAUGHNESSY, Zatkoff
RG-WOLTER, Timm
RT-STRIBE, Pederson
RE-OSTERMAN, Knutson, Stanford,
Pickard.
QB-TOPOR, Zanfaga
LH-PUTICH, Tinkham
RH-BRADFORD, Rescorla, Oldham
FB-PETERSON, Le Claire, Billings
ILLINOIS
LE-WODZIAK, J. Vernasco, Nosek
LT-BERSCHET, Baughman, Ulrich
G-LENZINI, Studley, Bauer
C-BORMAN, Popa, Sabino, Cole
RG-ERNST, Gnidovic, Murphy, Val-
entino
RT-D. TATE, Jenkins, Weddell
RE-SMITH, L. Stevens
QB-O'CONNELL, Miler, Brosky, En-
gels
LH-D. STEVENS, Neathery, Bachour-
os
RH-KARRAS, Wallace, Rebecca
FB-W. TATE, Dusenbury, Boerio
Score by Periods:
Michigan .........0 0 0 0........0
Illinois ...........0 0 0 7........7
Illinois Scoring-Touchdown: Smith;
Conversion: Rebecca.
eki ii
In cosmetics. too, phy.
sicians know best. Ask
your doctor about AR-EX
Cosmetics.-

a
;
:
r, :
t
f

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan