100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 28, 1951 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIG

_

AN DAILY SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2R, 1951
Tell Tale of Wolverine Conquest

COSTUME SYMBOLISM:
ColorfulGar'b Highlights
Speeeh epariment Play

By VIRGINIA VOSS
The Department of Speech is
billing their first play of the fall
season "simple and realistic," but
the costume committee has differ-
ent ideas.
They have had to dream up a,
Don Juan costume complete with
rhinestone-studded mask and two
Cireus pera
Will Be Given
On Television
"Circus," an original student
opera, will be presented on today's
Teletour on the University of
Michigan Television Hour.
Written by Edward M. Chuda-
coff, a gradiate student in the
School of Music, "Circus" will star
an all student cast. The program
is telecast by WWJ-TV, channel
4, from 1 to 2 p.m.
CHAIRMAN OF the University's
psychology department Donald G.
Marquis will be a guest on the
fifteen week Telecourse, "Man in
his World; Human Behavior,,"
which is taughat by Prof. Wilbert
J. McKeachie.
Vocabulary will be considered
by Prof. Winton H. Beaven of
the speech department on a sev-
en week Telecourse, "Democracy
in Action; Parliamentary Pro-
cedure."
On today's radio fare is a chil-
dren's' drama, "Rosalind a n d
Paul," written by Michael Lamb,
'52. The play is one of a series of
"Down Storybook Lane" programs
which the speech department
broadcasts daily.
It can be heard on WWJ, De-
troit, at 8:45 a.m.
An experimental radio play by
former University student, Char-
lotte Cohen, will be broadcast by
the speech department o v e r
WHRV and WUOM, Ann Arbor, at
8 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 30.

fantastic horse-heads for the pro-
duction of Kenneth Goldstein's
1951 Hopwood Award Play, "Live
on Air," to run Thursday, Friday,
and Saturday at\Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
* * *
AND IT wasn't a mere process
of letting imaginations run ram-
pant, according to Jeri Rich,
Grad., and Chuck Hoefler, '52, co-
chairmen of costuming. "Every
costume, from two billowy-sleeved
peasant blouses to the grotesque,
papier-mache horse-heads, has
important symbolism in the play."
The device by which Don Juan
is worked into a play concerning
a family of low-middle-class
Lithuanian immigrants is the
"dream sequence," which as
Goldstein puts it, "makes clear
the introversion of the charac-
ters."
The three-act drama will in-
clude -two such sequences, depict-
ing in modern dance the hidden
fantasy underlying the humdrum
life of the family. The choreogra-
Tickets for the -Thursday
night performance of "Live on
Air" will sell at a special stu-
dent rate of 50 cents.
phy is created and directed by
Esther E. Pease, Associate Super-
visor Women's Physical Education
Department.
* *~' *
COSTUMING for the ballet se-
quences required that each outfit
represent a particular desire of
the character and yet resemble
the real-life clothes he wears. In
one case, the teen-age daughter
Bea, who in Act 1 is fashioning
a plain white graduation dress,
turns up in the dream sequence
attired in a flowing, flounced
white gown, recognizable as the
dress she hopes to turn out on her
rusty sewing machine.
Tickets for "Live on Air" will
go on sale tomorrow at Lydia Men-
delssohn Box* Office, open from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

LSA Confab
To Be Held
On Tuesday
"The Value of Introductory
Courses" will be the topic of a
literary college conference to be
held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the
League.
Students, faculty and adminis-
tration will have an opportunity
to discuss the value of texts, cali-
bre of instruction and the desir-
ability of prerequisite courses.
* * *
SEVERAL alterations of Univer-
sity courses have come about as a
result of past conferences although
resolutions advocating specific re-
forms are never passed at meet-
ings, according to Jerry Warren,
'52, a member of the conference's
Steering Committee.
Warren pointed out that at
the Dec. 7, 1950 conference, the
topic was the counciling system.
Shortly afterwards, the Student
Advisors Program was instituted
by the University.
After another conference in
which an increase in foreign lang-
uage requirements was generally
advocated, the literary college fac-
ulty voted to approve the exten-
sion.
The conferences were initiated
in 1946 and after a temporary dis-
continuation were reactivated in
1949 by Deans Hayward Keniston
and Charles Peake of the literary
college. Last spring a steering
committee, made up of represen-
tatives of various campus groups,
was set up to arrange the confer-
ences and select discussion topics.

Pictures

'

WES BRADFORD STARTS OFF ON A 65 YARD RUN LATE IN THE FOURTH QUARTER.

li ""
.

I

i

~IN

Brian Aherne T Give Speech
On Great Literature Thursday

Brian Aherne, noted star of
stage and screen will present
"Great Moments in Great Liter-
ature" Thursday at the third lec- ;
ture of the current Oratorical Lec-
ture series.
The presentation will include
excerpts from many of Aherne's
stage and screen roles, as well as
readings from the classics,
IMMEDIATELY following his
IFC o Hol
Blood Center
A mobile Red Cross blood dona-
tion center will be located from
2 to 5 and from 7 to 10 p.m. Wed-
nesday and Thursday in the living
room of the Zeta Psi fraternity
house, under the sponsorship of
the Interfraternity Council.
The center will be open to all stu-
dents. Fraternity groups donating
blood will follow a pre-arranged
schedule.

talk here, the actor will be off for
New York where he will start re-
hearsals as Katherine Cornell's
leading man in "The Constant
Wife."
The Cornell-Aherne team is
not a new one. The two have
played together previously in
"St. Joan," "The Barretts of
Wimpole Street," and "Lucrece."
An actor since the ripe age of
10, English-born Aherne started
his career in the London Garrick
Theatre.
Schoolwork temporarily cut in-
to his grease-paint work, and he
didn't come into prominence until
after he received a degree from the
University of London.
Hollywood has claimed a major
portion of the actor's energies
since 1934, but he has continued
spasmodic appearances on the
stage. More recently he has be-
come known to the television audi-
ences.
.Tickets for the lecture are still
available and will be sold at the
Hill Auditorium box office. The
price is $1.50, $1.20 or 60 cents.

For Sale at

SWIFT'S
Drug Store
340 S. State
YOUR REXALL
STORE ON CAMPUS

I

4}e4bf
LE&S
e
ywew vWa }
f
Leeds Original

Smart,

All-Weather,

TYPICAL REACTION TO 'M' TOUCHDOWN

ALL-PURPOSE
CORT
Leads a double life, for mild
weather or icy blasts, has famous
winterized insulator lining,
zips in or out in an instant,
adjustable wind guard wristlets.
Sizes 8 to 18.

{j'r/ r' r
}

1

/porn

$65

....
... a;". 4 -is

FZI

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan