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October 27, 1951 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wolverine ug r-Not?

S

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I

By GEORGE FLINT
Associate Sports Editor
A Minnesota team which may be one of the "sleepers" of the Big
Ten tests the Michigan Wolverines this afternoon in the 42nd football
game between the two schools.
A Homecoming crowd of 87,000 will view the proceedings as
Michigan attempts to wrest its third straight Big Ten victory-and
the Little Brown Jug-from Wes Fesler's Golden Gophers.
N. *

Michigan - Minnesota
1892 - 1929

LAST YEAR a much better Michigan team went into the Minnesota
contest a heavy favorite, and came out with a 7-7 tie. So Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan and his squad will eye the Northmen with respect,
particularly since they found themselves with a 39-20 conquest of
Nebraska last week.
The Gophers, with one win and three losses, are a young
team and a rebuilding team; but their defensive line averages well
over 200 and the entire squad is big enough to remind Michigan
fans of the "Giants of the North" which Bernie Bierman used
1o send against the Wolverines.
Michigan enters the game with a two and two record, hardly
impressive on the face of things, but Oosterbaan has brought a some-
what inexperienced team along rapidly and the Maize and Blue must
rank as favorites on the strength of the two conference wins

1892 Minnesota
1893 Minnesota
1895 MICHIGAN
1896 MICHIGAN
1897 MICHIGAN0
1902 MICHIGAN
1903 MICHIGAN
1909 MICHIGAN
1910 MICHIGAN
1919 Minnesota
1920 MICHIGAN
1921 MICHIGAN
1922 MICHIGAN
1923 MICHIGAN
1924 MICHIGAN
1925 MICHIGAN
1926 MICHIGAN
1926 MICHIGAN6
1927 Minnesota
1929 MICHIGAN

16
34
20
6
14
23
6
15
6
34
3
38
16
10
13
35
20
7
13
-7

MICHIGAN
MICHIGAN
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
MICHIGAN
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
MICHIGAN
Minnesota

6
20
0
4
0
s
s
6
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
6
W
6

have in the last two games, but reserve strength at the right halfback
position is sparse with the questionable condition of Tom Witherspoon,
the number three man. Freshman Eddie Hickey has been called up to
the varsity to bolster the wingback ranks.
For the Gophers, a sophomore named Paul Giel figures to be
a marked man this afternoon. Giel, who started out the season as
a quarterback but who now plays left half, has gained 159 yards on
37 carries. Through the air, the Gopher youngster (he's only 18)
has been even more successful. He has 32 completions out of 64
aerial attempts for 365 yards.
The most successful Gopher ground gainer on the basis of
average yardage is another sophomore, 205-pound Ron Wallin. Wallin
has picked up 87 yards in 11 carries for an imposing eight yard
average.
AS A TEAM, Minnesota has gained 70 yards via the ground to
1,080 for its opponents. The Gophers have not been the defensive
wizards they were in their salad days.
In the three losses--to Washington, California, and North-
western-Minnesota gathered only 41 points while allowing their
opponents a whopping 101.
Fesler sees the Gophers' weakness to be a question of fundamentals.
They've lost 10 of 17 fumbles, and five of those 10 led to touchdowns
for the opponents.

Michigan - Minnesota
1930 - 1950
1930 MICHIGAN 7 Minnesota 0
1931 MICHIGAN 6 Minnesota 0
1932 MICHIGAN 3 Minnesota 0
1933 MICHIGAN 0 Minnesota 0
1934 Minnesota 34 MICHIGAN !0
1935 Minnesota 40 MICHIGAN 0
1936 Minnesota 26 MICHIGAN 0
1937 Minnesota 39 MICHIGAN 6
1938 Minnesota 7 MICHIGAN 6
1939 Minnesota 20 MICHIGAN 7
1940 Minnesota 7 MICHIGAN 6
1941 Minnesota 7 MICHIGAN 0
1942 Minnesota 16 MICHIGAN 14
1943 MICHIGAN 49 Minnesota 6
1944 MICHIGAN 28 Minnesota 13
1945 MICHIGAN 26 Minnesota 0
1946 MICHIGAN 21 Minnesota 0
1947 MICHIGAN 13 Minnesota 6
1948 MICHIGAN 27 Minnesota 14
1949 MICHIGAN 14 Minnesota '7
1950 MICHIGAN 7 Minnesota 7

AND THE BLOCKING and tackling has not been as sharp as the
onetime Ohio State mentor would like to have it. As a result, the
Gophers have been working hard on the basic fundamentals of this
game of football.
The Michigan-Minnesota rivalry has been a rich and varied
one. This is the forty-second meeting between the two schools.
Thus far, Michigan has won 25 to the Gophers' 13. The two teams
have tied three times, including last year's ragged 7-7 contest.
The worst beating ever administered by the Wolverines was
their 49-6 victory in 1943. That wintended an eight-year draught of
Minnesota triumphs. Since then the Gophers haven't beaten Michigan,
although they were highly favored in 1949.
' d¢ * * *7
THAT YEAR the Wolverines rebounded from a disappointing
loss to Army to drop Bierman's team, 14-7.
Minnesota came close to breaking the Michigan string last
season with a 7-7 tie. This year they're as far "up" for the annual
battle as they've ever been.
Fesler's young men are short on experience but long on en-
thusiasm. In contrast to last season, one of the most disappointing in
Minnesota's history, the Northmen are mentally ready to play foot-
ball.

r

-o v* *.
will field about the same lineup as they

SEVEN OF'
either freshmen

THE ELEVEN possible starters for the Gophers are
or sophomores. Included is the probable quarterback,
See WOLVERINES, Page Three

THE WOLVERINES

\:Yl r e

tr t

A6F
:43 a t ty

Latest Deadline in the State
VOL. LXII, No. 29 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1951 EIGHT PAGES

Fans Crowd AA
For Gopher Tilt

Peace Hopes Up;
FightingSlows
By The Associated Press
A concession by the Communists relinquishing the 38th Parallel
as a cease-fire line gave renewed hope to peace prospects in Korea
today.
Meanwhile, on the front lines, ground action subsided, but the
air war waxed hotter as U.S. and Russian-built jets tangled over
North Korea.

JOE HENDRICKSON
... Minnesota end

DON PETERSON
. . . Michigan fullback

k

By HARLAND BRITZ
The lure of football, old ac-
quaintances and a 15 cent brown
waterjug will attract more than
87,000 grid fans today to the sta-
dium to witness the 54th annual
homecoming struggle.
Cool and cloudy weather will
greet the throng and a possibility
of rain before the proceedings are
over lurks as a grim possibility.
But the rain, which isn't expected
until late afternoon or early eve-
ning shouldn't put a damper on
World Nlews
Roundup
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Third quarter
earnings less than one-half those
of a year ago were reported yester-
day by General Motors Corp.
which said higher costs and lower
profit margins were major factors
in the drop.
WASHINGTON-The Army
said yesterday that, under pres-
ent plans, Organized Reservists
who have been called to arms
must serve 24 months and that
members of Organized Reserve
units will be released as indi-
viduals, not in units, after they
complete the term of duty.
VANCOUVER, B.C. - Princess
Elizabeth and Philip, Duke of Ed-
inburgh, started their return trip
across Canada yesterday, as
thousands cheered them along a
14-mile motor route.

the spirits of the Wolverine fans,
who will be out to see their team
win its third straight conference
game.
* * *
THE LITTLE Brown Jug, ori-
ginally purchased in 1903 by Coach
Fielding Yost, will hold the guest
of honor spot on the Michigan
bench, where it has resided since
1943. But several hundred Min-
nesota fans will be on hand to yell
their team to recapture the covet-
ed symbol.
Their special train will have
arrived from Minneapolis at
12:45 p.m. today.
University alumni - old and
new - will be wandering around
the campus all day,
THEY'LL ALSO stare at the
concoctions that student dormi-
tories, fraternity and sorority
houses have constructed in honor
of the day.
The judging caravan will have
completed its annual tour at
11 a.m. today.
Between halves,. the famous
Michigan Marching Band will pay
a tribute to former University
President Alexander Ruthven. De-
tails of the extravaganza, rumored
to be the finest show the band has
yet presented, have been kept a
deep secret,
The Minnesota band will not
make the long trip to Ann Arbor as
it did two years ago.
See FANS, Page 7
U.S. Agrees
To Give Tito
Modern Arms
WASHINGTON -- (P) - The
United States has agreed to send
modern American weapons to
Communist Yugoslavia to help
arm the country against the pos-
sibility of outside attack, officials
said yesterday.
They said American and Yugo-
slav authorities, after weeks of
secret negotiations, have agreed
on the terms of a military aid pact
which will govern the flow of these
weapons.
A FORMAL signing ceremony is
scheduled to take place in Bel-
grade "within a few days."
This is the first time in the
post-war period that the U.S.
has agreed to send American
arms to the government of a
Communist nation.
Brig. Gen. John W. Harmony,

*

SITE OF TRUCE TALKS-Negotiators are meeting in the village
of Panmunjom, shown above, in an effort to reach an iarmistice
in the Korean war. The talks began on Oct. 23 after a break of
more than two months. UN and Red representatives are holding
their meetings in the tent in the foreground. This morning's
meeting lasted for two hours.
Truman Calls On Dock
Strikers To End Walkout

LOWELL PERRY
. . . Michigan end

*

NEW YORK-OP)-In the'inter-
ests of national defense, President
Truman last night called on rebel
east coast dock strikers to "re-
turn to work at once."
He said the wildcat strike has
"virtually paralyzed" the great
ports of Boston and New York.
"Equipment and material vital-
ly needed for national defense is
not moving," he added.
There was no immediate re-
Egyptians Bar
BritishNavy
CAIRO, Egypt-(P)--The Egyp-
tian Government yesterday de-
clared a ban on British warships in
the Suez Canal but the French op-
erating company said it would defy
any orders to interfere with canal
transit.
Egypt's announcement on war-
ships was made by Foreign Min-
ister Mohammed Salah El Din .at
a news conference. He sketched a
policy of non-cooperation with
Britain, the United States and
France, and indicated Egypt was
too weak in arms to fight an or-
ganized war to get rid of the Bri-
tish.
Interior Minister Fouad Serag
El Din Pasha said at a later news

sponse from the striking steve-
dores in New York. They were
mapping plans for even bigger
picket lines when Mr. Truman
made his statement.
"This work stoppage has a di-
rect and immediate effect on our
defense effort," the President said.
The strike was put in White
House hands a short time earlier,
amid desperate pleas that the
President halt it. His federal me-
diators said they tried and failed
to win peace. They quit Thursday
when truce talks broke down.
That left the next step up to Mr.
Truman. His back-to-work call
was his first move. If it fails, there
are several concrete steps he can
take-including proclamation of a
national emergency and use of
the Taft-Hartley law.
'U' Ranks High
In 'Who 's Who'
In a tabulation of the number of
people from each University that
are listed in the current edition of
'Who's Who,' the University placed
third in the country.
Conducted by the weekly pub-
lication 'chon land Society,' the

Truce Talks... '
MUNSAN, Korea -(P)- Com-
munist abandonment of the 38th
Parallel as a demarcation line
somewhat brightened Korean
cease-fire prospects today.
The line which the Reds did
suggest at Friday's sub-committee
meeting in Panmunjom was quick-
ly rejected by the United Nations
negotiators "because it does not
provide military protection for our
troops."
* * *
HOWEVER, Red failure to in-
sist on the old 38th Parallel boun-
dary was the most important de-
velopment since the truce talks
began last July 10.
For the first time it lifted the
issue out of the political arera
and placed it where the UN said
it always belonged-in the mili-
tary field. The Reds and the UN
met for two hours this morning
at Panmunjom, then recessed
till 3 p.m.
Replying to a United Nations
proposal for a buffer zone, the
Tories W in Elec-
tion: See Page 2
Communists yesterday suggested a
demilitarized zone up to 15 miles
south of the present battle front.
* *K
THIS WOULD require the Allies
to give up such territories as the
"Iron Triangle," Heartbreak Ridge
and the Punchbowl, all won at
great cost.
It would leave the UN holding
territory as much as 12 to more
than 30 miles in some places in
North Korea.
The Allied rejection could not
dim the wave of optimism that
swept the UN advance camp at
Munsan. The way was open for
further dickering, more give and
take which could lead to a solu-
tion of the issue.
One UN source admitted that
the Allies were ready to make "mi-
nor refinements" in their own pro-
posal for a line generally following
the battlefront.

* * *
'Ba ttlef ront .
American jets shot down two
more Russian-made MIG-15s yes-
terday in the eontinuing series of
flashing dogfights over Northwest
Korea.
Three Red jets were reported

GROUND ACTION slowed while
subcommittees bargained at the
Panmunjom truce talks, but some
Allied gains were made in Western
and Centlal Korea.
Although relatively minor, the
fighting was bitter-some of it
hand-to-hand.
From naval headquarters came
a belated report that the U.S.
heavy Helena and the destroyer
escort Ulbert M. Moore were hit
by Red shore battiers off the
northeast coast. One sailor was
killed and two were wounded
aboard the Helena Oct. 22. Both
ships remained in action.
The'two Russian-made jets shot
down by U.S. F-86 sabrejets yes-
terday brought to 13 the number
the Fifth Air Force has listed as
blasted out of the Korean skies in
six straight d-.ys of air battles.

damaged.

RON WALLIN
. Minnesota fu lb -

*

* * *

Still

EliamAW#A

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