100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 23, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1951

Pharmacy

College

Celebrates

75th

Birthday)

MUSICAL FACULTY:
Stanley Quartet To Open
Concert Series Today

Past Marked
By Criticism
Established in 1876 despite bit-
ter criticism, the College of Phar-
macy will celebrate its 75th anni-
versary tomorrow and Thursday.
The founding of the pharmacy
college, the first State school of
its kind, was opposed from its in-
ception by other pharmacy schools
then in existence.
* * *
IT ALL STARTED in 1868 when
a 'curriculum in pharmacy was
organized, leading to the degree of
pharmaceutical chemist.
The tprotest was aroused by
the organization of pharmacy
instruction into a full-time stu-
dy program, and the admittance
of students who had not pre-
viously had experience as phar-
macists' apprentices.
The debate became an open
battle at a meeting of the Ameri-
can Pharmaceutical Association in
1871 when the Michigan plan of
education was denied recognition.
For many years the University
continued alone in its advanced
program until gradually other
schools, recognizing the advant-
ages, began to adopt similar plans.
The curriculum was organized
into. a school of pharmacy in 1876.
After years of continued expan-
sion and increased enrollment the
name was changed to College of
Pharmacy in 1915.
* * *
PROGRESSING from an "art
Try FOLLETT'S First
OOKS
A A C
BARGAIN PRICES
Call 1 CI~fT S"T°C~

I

PRESCRIPTIONS-The Prescription Laboratory is one of the
numerous specialized labs housed in the Chemistry-Pharmacy
building for experimental manufacturing processes, introductory
courses, pharmaceutical analysis, pharmacognosy and research
work.

.1
which does not require theoretical
knowledge" as it was once de-
fined, pharmacy has come to in-
volve the study of highly theoreti-
cal subjects, combined with prac-
tical application in laboratory
work.
A thorough, well - balanced
course of study designed to pre-
pare students not only for
prescription work and commer-
cial pharmacy but also for a
great variety of professional po-
sitions is offered by the College.
Graduates occupy positions as
manufacturing and research phar-
macists, directors of public health
IRS T AT WILD'S
collar to cufl

* * '

NEW STYLES F1

It's new

from

A

merican

LungeQ
* Narrower shoulders
* Narrower lapels
* Less drape
*Soft and easy
slenderizing lines
* Most comfortable,
most becoming
suit you ever had!1
( . $60 a $85
T*

service laboratories and deans and!
members of faculties of colleges'
of pharmacy throughout t h e
world.
In addition to complete labora-
tory and classroom facilities
housed in the Chemistry-Pharma-
cy building, the library resources
form an important part of the
equipment. The departmental lii'
brary serves as a daily workroom
for students, containing 15,000
volumes related to the subject of
pharmacy.
The anniversary year also marks
the appointment of a new Dean
of the College, Tom D. Rowe, the
eighth man to hold the position.
The first dean, Dr. Albert B.
Prescott was succeeded by Julius
Schlotterveck, 1905-1917; Alviso
B. Stevens, 1917-1919; Henry
Kraemer, 1919-1920; Edward E.
Kraus, 1920-1933; Howard B. Le-
sis, 1933-1957; and Charles H.
Stocking 1947-1951.
Alumni of the college, many of
whom have achieved recognition
as officers in national pharmacy
organizations, will be on campus
for the anniversary.
Gothic's .Film
Program Set
]Featuring 10 important recently
re-issued films and the world's
first animated cartoon, the Gothic
Film Society yesterday announced
its fifth program.
Starring in the movies will be
old-time favorites Harold Lloyd,
Greta Garbo and Rudolph Valen-
tino.
Beginning with the British dgc-
umentary, "Desert Victory," on
October 29, the society will present
Nov. 26 "The Golem," a German
film and "The Freshman" starring
Harold Lloyd, accompanied by
four shorts.
Highlighting the 1952 presenta-
tions will be the Feb. 4 showing of
Robert L. Flaherty's "Moana,"
which is planned as a memorial to
the famous American documen-
tary producer.
Those wishing to procure men-
bership tickets may purchase
them for $4 by check or money or-
der at 716 N. Fifth Ave. Remain-
ing memberships will go on sale
from 7:30 to 8 p.m., October 29,
when the opening presentation,
"Desert Victory," will be shown.
For a 50c admission charge, guests
may accompany members to the
showings, according to William
Hampton, Grad., director of the
group.

Celebration
To Be Held
A two-day celebration will begin
at 9 a.m. tomorrow honoring the
seventy-fifth anniversary of the
University pharmacy college.
Starting with registration and
tours of the College, the celebra-
tions will coptinue with a sym-
posium "The Next Twenty-five
Years in Pharmacy" at 2 p.m. to-
morrow in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre and will again resume
Thursday afternoon.
* * *
PARTICIPANTS tomorrow will
be alumni members Dr. R. A.
Deno, director of education rela-
tions for the American Council of
Pharmaceutical Education; Dr.
Justin L. Powers, chairman of the
National Formulary Committee;
and Dr. D. E. Francke, chief phar-
macist of the University Hospital
and president of the American
Pharmaceutical Association.
At 8 p.m. tomorrow an open
house for guests will be held in
the Union ballroom, with enter-
'tainment being provided by the
Michigan Glee Club and Band.
Marvin L. Niehuss, vice-presi-
dent of the University will preside
at a University convocation at 10
a.m. Thursday. The address will
be given by Dr. Charles H. Rogers,
dean of the pharmacy college at
the ,University of Minnesota and
Dr. Leonard M. Scheele, surgen
general of the United States Public
Health Service. This program is
open to the public.
Former Dean of the pharmacy
college, Clarles H. Stocking will
preside at the symposium Thurs-1
day afternoon. Victor Middleton,
Charles Walgreen and G. D.
Searle, representing t h e retail1
drug business, will participate in
the discussion.
Presilent Harlan H. Hatcher
will be the main speaker at a ban-..
quet at 7 p.m. Thursday in the'
Union Ballroom. Former Dean'
Howard B. Lewis will act as toast-'
master and the program will in-
clude numbers by the University
Quartet, and an address by Dean
Rowe.
Groups Plan
UN Day Meet
United Nations Day will be
marked by a special meeting joint-
ly sponsored by ,the BEACON as-
sociation and UNESCO at 7:45
p.m. tomorrow at the International
Center.
Prof. Lawrence Preuss, of the
political stience department will
speak on "The United Nations--
After Five Years." Following the
address refreshments will be
served.
United Nations Day is celebrated
to reaffirm faith in the ability of
peoples of the world to stand unit-
ed to escape the scourge of war
and to establish peace which will
ultimately end in the recognition
of fundamental human rights, ac-
cording to B. V. Govinderaj, sec-
retary of the BEACON associa-
tion.
The BEACON association is
made up of students directly de-
scended from the nations of the
British Empire and Common-
wealth of Nations.

Students are being asked to con-
tribute to the financing of pep.
rallies.
The new plan, devised by a new
pep rally committee composed of'
Student Legislature and Wolverine,
Club members, also calls for funds
to be raised by the sponsorship of
a Cinema Guild movie.
The responsibility of providing
money for the public address sys-
tem, wood for the bonfire and
other materials needed to make
the rallies successful was shoul-
dered by SL until last year when
the Wolverine Club took over.
The pep club went heavily into
debt last year and the necessity
for a new system of finance be-
came apparent.
The new committee has already
i TYPEWRITERS I

With a view toward bringing
fine chamber music to Michigan,
and especially the University, the
Stanley Quartet will appear at
8:30 p.m. today at Rackham Lec-
ture Hall in the first of three con-
certs for this semester.
Composed of Music School fac-
ulty, the Quartet was established
by the University in 1948 and has
since become a regular feature of
the musical agenda for each
school year. It was named after
Prof. Albert A. Stanley, often
called "The Grand Old Man of
.draft .Boards
to Induct 13
Washtenaw county's two draft-
boards will induct a total of 13
men in December, State Selective
Service Director, Glenn B. Arnold
announced yesterday.
Six of the draftees will be taken
from Ann Arbor Board No. 85 and
the remaining seven from Ypsi-
lanti Board No. 341.
Arnold assigned a total quota
of 1115 men to state draft boards,
but stipulated that only 892 would
actually be inducted into the
armed services. The additional
men will account for last minute
deferments and "other emergen-
cies," Arnold explained.
Current schedules call for 15
men to be drafted from Ann Ar-
bor in November with 18 set to
be inducted from Ypsilanti.

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY-Pharmacy courses first offered
at the University were conducted entirely within the chemistry
department in labs like the one above, until 1876 when the pro-
gram was organized into a school of pharmacy.
TOTAL COSTS CUT:
Studep aContrbutions Asked
For Pep Rally Finance Plan

sent out letters to all residences
on campus requesting donations.
Total cost of rallies has been
considerably cut this year by eli-
miinating the services of the Plant
Department.. In former years the
department had set up the plat-
form and provided the wood. The
total budget for the five rallies
planned for this football season
is $350, while in other years just
two rallies have cost this much.
In the future it is hoped that
sufficient funds can be raised
through Cinema Guild movies and
similar projects alone.

"../

RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED

Music," who served at the Uni-
versity from 1839 to 1922.
Included in the concert tolay
will be "Quartet in E-flat Major,
Op. 74" by Beethoven; "Quartet
in E, No. 6 (1951)" by Prof. Ross
Lee Finney of the School of Mu-
sic; and "Quintet in A major, K.
581" by Mozart.
In an effort, to tie the concerts
together in a purposeful and
meaningful way, the Quartet pre-
sents the works of many com-
posers in chronological sequence.
At each concert,'for example, the
quartet will present a' work by
Beethoven.
The Quartet also feels that con-
temporary works should be heard
more than once, and so are re-
peating many works which they
presented last summer. In addi-
tion the Quartet will introduee
this season a new American work'-
especially commissibned by the
University.
This season will mark the
f i r s t appearance of Robert
Courte, violinist, during the
regular school year. Courte
played with the Quartet during
the summer semester. A former
faculty member of the Brussels
Conservatory, Courte joined the ;
University faculty in 1951.
Other members of the Quartet
are Prof. Gilbert Ross, first vio-
linist; Emil Raab, second violinist
and Prof. Oliver Edel, cellist. All
have had extensive experien Ae on
quartets before joining the tan-
ley Quartet.

LIVE-ON AIR

STUDENT SUPPLIES
G.!. Requisitions
Accepted on Supplies Only
Webster-Chicago Wire Recorders
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St. Ph.7177
fountain pens repaired

READ and USE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

n

i
ti 5::1'
C;i }y?:
:: ' 1'
t :? ii
1:j::
C"i :
t+ ::;::
r ti;..
(c;''2
"r:::;
1 ::
b:4:: >:
h _:;fi i
t:
k i:C}:
±.:;,;:
1, '
t :% : :

Campus Interviews on Ci

No. 25
THE
SEA
HORSE

~'
M .
E
k
L
M
-

\ "
Va

s
i
0
..
I!
s _ .
,_

0/

rarette T ss410
Tesltofh
W Ijrhet
) L Wel. dr~nT {A'
.d.4f
CLI
Col r
.,
Ob
Q ....
>i.,
f
s*1*
..

d
0
O0
0

U

D tILD'SA 's
State Street on the Campus

I-.

men Franlind PrinteJ:
e that can take rest
is greater than
he that can take cities."
B. Franklin
Por Richard'sAmanac,1737
There's a time to pause in every activity.
When you make that pause refreshing with
ice-cold Coca-Cola you can take what comes
with ease.

A co

his little gee-gee was all at sea. It was
enough to upset his equine-imity. He'd been
reading about those rush-rush cigarette tests
-the quick sniff, the fast puff. "Hardly the
scientific approach," he said in his confusion.
But then he realized that one test is an equine
of a different pigmentation-a thorough,
conclusive test of cigarette mildness.
It's the sensible test ... the 30-Day Camel
Mildness Test, which simply asks you to try
Camels as your steady smoke-on a day-after-day

"!

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan