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October 21, 1951 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-21

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1951

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EXTENSION SERVICE EXTENDED:
ArtClasses, TVOffered in 40th Year

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Football, Religion Top
College Controversies

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Telecourses
Begin Today
On WWJ-TV
A relaxed classroom where stu-
dents may smoke, whisper, eat a
six course dinner and make their,
own choice of attire-from paja-
mas to an apron-is one of the
advantages offered by University
telecourses.
Sending an Extension Service
education into living rooms, bars
and restaurants, the University
will resume its weekly telecast of
college courses today. President
Harlan H. Hatcher will be intro-
duced to the television audience
on this initial program according
to Prof. Garnet R. Garrison, dir-
ector of television.
THE PROGRAMS, telecast over
WWJ-TV, from 1 to 2 p.m. each
Sunday, will follow the pattern
established last year when the pro-
grams were first inaugurated at
the suggestion of the station,
The hour will be divided into
three twenty-minute periods: the
first, devoted to a fifteen week
telecourse on "Man in His World-
Human Behavior"; the second,
into two shorter courses in suc-
cession of a less academic na-
ture; the third, to a weekly "tele-
tour" or view of some Univer-
sity activity.
Prof. Wilbert J. McKeachie of
the psycholog'y department will
teach the course on human be-
havior.
Prof. McKeachie, however, is
pessimistic about the telecourse.
"There will be a conflict between
education and entertainment," he
explained, "and I believe that en-
tertainment will win out." People
Will be more likely to turn to
someone like Milton Berle than to
anything that hints of education."
On the other hand, Prof. Mc-
Keachie pointed out, "Psychologi-
cal dramas always seem to be pop-
ular and we intend to make an
attempt to present dramatic situa-
tions, then probe into their under-
lying meaning."
PROF. WINTON H. Beaben of
the speech department will teach
a seven week course on parliamen-
tary procedure starting Oct. 21.
Prof. Willard Olson, director of re-
search and child development will
teach a course on "Understanding
the Child-Growth and Develop-
ment at Home and School"
Registration for the telecours-
es will continue for several weeks
at the University Extension Ser
vice, Rm. 4524 Administration
Bldg. or at the University Ex-
tension Center, Rackham Educa-
tional Memorial, 60 Farnsworth,
Detroit.
Those who register receive sup-
plementary printed materials and
are given a Certificate of Partici-
pation upon completing the course
and writing an examination. A
fee of $2 will be charged for the
15-week course and $1 for each of
the short courses.
Last year's program was sup-
ported by 2,000 students who reg-
istered for courses and won two
national awards for station WWJ-
TV for outstanding public service.
Surveys showed that the program
had an audience of about 100,000
viewers.

Courses in Taxes,
LeadershipAdded
This month the University Extension Service celebrates its
growth from a modest beginning as a lecture bureau forty years ago,
by offering a wide rangs of courses-from th estudy of taxation to
faster reading courses to practice in string ensembles.
Heading the list are a complete art program, the unique University
telecourses and the recent additions: "Taxation" and "New Ways in
Group Leadership" which met for the first time last week.
A GROWING interest in art courses brings University students
and Ann Arbor residents to the paper strewn studios on the fourth
floor of the Architecture Building where they may seek an educa-
tion or relaxation in the midst of
a clutter of psuedo-Greek and
Roman sculpture.

By HARLAND BRITZ
Action on college campuses this .
week was more verbal than any-
thing else, as student editorialists
sounded off on the improper em-
phasis on football and on a reli-
gious question at New York Uni-
versity.
On'the de-emphasis front, one
significant bit of action came from
the University of Virginia where
a special faculty committee recom-
mended the abolition of athletic
scholarships and athletic subsidies.
A RETURN to amateurism was
suggested by the Nashville Banner
which advocated elimination of
admission charge to games and do-
ing away with spring practice and
post-season games.
lout the Louisiana State Uni-
versity Daily played a strange
tune, proposing that the prac-
tise of paying salaries to ath-
letes should continue. It also
advocated that athletes should-
n't attend classes or even pursue
studies.
After being told by a varsity
player that "Football is no longer
a sport but an occupation," the
editor of the Wisconsin Cardinal
opined that, "athletics and stu-
dent cheating merely mimic the
rest of our society-at its worst."

One frustrated 'writer in the
MacMurray Greetings, said, "I do
not believe that the college con-
science is gone .. . There is a so.
lution if we only could put our
hands on it."
MEANWHILE AT New York
University :commerce school, theh
student Bulletin attacked a 20
year old policy requiring Christian
and Jewish students to run for
high student offices on alternate
years.
The proponents of the alterna-
tion setup say that if no such law
existed the Jewish students, who
are presumed to be in the major-
ity, would always elect Jewish
students.
It was also claimed by pro-alter-
nation spokesmen that Jewish stu-
dents were for alternation when
they were in the minority back in
1933, and that now the Christians
are in the minority position, they
are going to receive the same "pro-
tection" that the Jews received,
But the Bulletin charges that if
the student body is not mature
enough to elect its officers with-
out benefit of religious alterna-
tion, then it is not mature enough
to deserve the right to vote-and
the University has failed in its job.

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RELAXED ATMOSPHERE - CLASSROOM FOR TELECOURSES

With "too many" students en-
rolled in the four classes of the
Extension Service's art programl
and a surprising lack of interest
shown in the newly innovated4
life modeling class, the night
life of the architecture college
began another season on Sep-f
tember 24.
Because of the continuing de-
mand for courses in design, ceram.
ics and painting, the architecture
college had planned to offer a
group of five extension courses
this fall, adding a new course in
modeling from life, using clay as
a medium.
Although the basic ceramic de-
sign course at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday
is filled to capacity and J. T. Aber-
nathy, instructor in the architec-
ture college, reports that there are
almost too many students to count,
so few students reported for the
new course that it was cancelled.
THE LACK of interest in the
new modeling class has been a
contradiction to the success of the
other courses. This year as in the
past the Wednesday painting and
drawing class, taught by Richard
Wilt, has filled four rooms to
overflowing.
Other classes offered are free-
hand drawing on Thursdays and
basic design on Mondays. Prof.
Alexander M. Valerio conducts the
drawing class which is open to
both beginners and advanced stu-
dents interested in doing either
creative work in freehand draw-
ing, using still life, model or freely
chosen subject matter.
These classes are both typical
of the educational program that
the Extension Service now spon-
sors. However, at the outset of
the Service it had an entirely
different purpose.
In October, 1911, President Har-
ry B. Hutchins of the University,
asked Prof. William D. Henderson
to devote one half day each week
to the handling of the University
faculty lectures. In 1918 the small
lecture bureau had grown to such
an extent that Prof. Henderson
was asked to spend his entire time
supervising a regularly organized
division of the University - the
University Extension Service.
RESPONDING to popular de-
mand, other departments and ser-
vices were gradually added to the
Service. Within two years after it
was officially established, a class
program was set up in Detroit as
a result of a petition from 1,700
persons.
Prof. Henderson resigned as dir-
ector of the organization in 1937
and was succeeded by Prof. Char-
les A. Fisher. The present director
is Everett J. Soop who was ap-
pointed in 1948, after Prof. Fisher's
death.
Under Soop's direction, the Serv-
ice has expanded its activities to
provide courses throughout the
State of Michigan. These studies
are to be found in such communi-
ties as Detroit, Saginaw, Flint,
Jackson, Port Huron, Sault Ste.
Marie and Ironwood.

I I.

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explain sonic of the facts about the diamond. . . . Then
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We won't try to tell you that we can sell you a $100.00
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can, for instance, show you a 1 carat 23 points) dia-
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We invite you to stop in for a booklet entitled "Diamonds
-Their Purchase and Their Care." Or, if more conven-
ient, mail us a post card, giving your name and address
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(~~~Jcade jewelry
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* I
I

DOROTHY SCHNMIDEt 54A, WIELDS TER BRUSH ATTENTION FOCUSES ON A SET-UP IN THE OIL CLASS

A Daily
Photo
Feature
Story by Gayle Greene
and Sam Siporn
Pictures by Bruce Knoll,
Malcolm Shatz and
Larry Wilk

4

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