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October 19, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

SIX

THE MICHIGAN D AILX

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19 1951

T!TTr

U Pamphlet
Savors New
[ax Districts
Tax assessment districts based
a large cities and counties ra-
ier than townships would make
e administration of Michigan's
operty tax more efficient, ac-
rding to a studyby the Univer-
ty Institute of Public Adminis-
"ation.
The study, which resulted in the
um'phlet, "Property Tax Admin-
tration in Michigan," was con-
icted by Claude R. Tharp, re-
arch associate of the University.
IN THIS booklet he recommend-
3 increasing the size of the as-
ssment districts to reduce the
umber of assessors from 1,800 to
)0.
Tharp also advised that asses-
'rs be appointed by the county
lard of supervisors on the basis
qualifying examinations. Ap-
)inting the collectors rather than
ecting them will result in more
ficient collections, Tharp con-
nded, because , elected officials
e afraid to antagonize taxpay-
°s who are also voters.
The tax, which everyone pays
. one way or another, is the
rgest single source of public
nds, amounting to about 45 per
nt of the total local and state
venues.
reneration Holds
contest for Cover
The art staff of Generation, stu-
nt' art magazine, is sponsoring
contest for the cover of their
inter issue, which will be pub-
hed soon.
Any student may submit a cover
sign to the Generation office in
Le Student Publications Building
fore Oct. 26. The design must
ntain the words "Generation,"
Winter Issue," and "35c."

Campus
Calendar

E
4
I
i

ANOTHER HOPKINS?
Dean Fauri Prominent
Social Worker. Educator

-Daily-Bestmann
CONFEDERATE KITTY-This proud-looking feline confidently
walked into West Quad yesterday, made his way into Georgian
Ron Goldstein's room, and comfoiably situated himself beside a
Confederate Flag. Believing that the cat would serve as a good
omen for the South, Goldstein, '55, christened him "General Ro-
bert E. Lee."
Ad Soli Citing .Women
Bringse Pleasant Results

Events Today
HILLEL-The first in a series
of fire-side discussions sponsored
by Hillel will be held at 7:30 p.m.
at Lane Hall. Prof. William Ha-
ber of the economics department
will speak on the "Role of the Stu-'
dent in a Community." A discus-
sion andhsocial hour will follow
the speech.
ROUNDTABLE-"Oil Dispute in
Iran" will be the topic of the In-
ternational Roundtable to be
heard at 8 p.m. over WUOM,
ASTRONOMY-The second in
its series of lectures and visitors'
nights will be held by the astron-
omy department at 7:30 p.m. to-
day in Angell Hall. Karl G. Hen-
ize of the astronomy department
will speak on "The Clouds of Ma-
gellan" at 7:30 p.m. in Rm. 3017
Angell Hall. After the lecture
the Students' Observatory on the
fifth floor will be open for teles-
copic observation.
MOVIES-The University Mu-
seums wmillpresent three movies
at 7:30 p.m. at Kellogg Auditor-
ium. The movies are: "Mountain
Building," "Wearing Away of
Land" and "The Andes."
Events Tomorrow
PICNIC-Beacon, the British
Empire and Commonwealth of
Nations association will sponsor
a picnic for all interested students,
at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow.
DEBATE-More than 350 high
school students from an estimated
35 Michigan schools will attend
the fifth annual Debate Clinic
sponsored by the speech depart-
ment on campus.
TALK-Len Wilcox, '52, presi-
dent of SL will speak on "What
SL Expects of the Student Reli-
gious Association," at 12:15 p.m.
at the Saturday Luncheon Discus-
sion, All students interested in
participating are invited to at-
tend.
Rides to Games
Offered by Uniont
Students planning to follow the
football team to the Illinois and
Cornell games may sign up for
rides to Champaign and Ithaca
with the Union travel service be-
tween 3 and 5 p.m. any week day
in the Union student office.
Union staffman Harry Blum, '54,
travel service director, urged inter-
ested students to register immed-
iately, because a large response is
anticipated.

By DIANE DECKER
Noted during his college days as
a horse jockey, Dean Fidele F.
Fauri, of the newly-founded
School of Social Work, is still go-
ing at a fast pace.
Since the day in 1933 when the
new dean received his degree from
the University, he has risen to a
position of national prominenceas
a government social worker and
educator.
IN 1947, as a senior specialist in
social legislation with the Library
of Congress, Fauri was accredited
with much of the 1950 amended
version of the Federal Social Se-
curity Act..
At that time, one prominent#
member of Congress remarked:
"Fauri knows more about social
security than any man in the
country. He clearly is an ex-
pert, but fortunately doesn't talk
like one."
Though having his own private
law practice, Fauri became inter-
ested in social work early in his
career. He became employed in
Michigan's State Department of
Social Welfare, and later was ap-
pointed State Supervisor of the
Michigan Bureau of Social Secur-
ity.
He then moved to Washington
as a senior specialist.
WHEN THE Regents voted last
year to establish the School of
Social Work, Fauri was chosen to
head the new school, which wV,!
formerly part of the Rackham
Foundation, located in Detroit.
The dean's future plans for the
school include "placing more work
with public agencies and giving the
school more of a direct focus on
communities throughout the State,
Our emphasis will be on public
service." he added.
Reliving in Ann Arbor a "pleas-
ant experience of his past," Fauri
enjoys his new home. He finds it
an ideal place for his children-
David, 11 years old, Eric, nine
years old, and seven year old Paul.
READ
andK
USE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

I USED GUNS
on trade toward any merchandise
Open Every Friday Night - Lots of Parking Space
SPORTING GOODS
634Soth 'maden Strea/as wenmake - 4
634 $outh Main Street Phone 2-4407

;4

DEAN FAURI

--- - - ---- ----- - --

KYE
Hasten yourselves at
the appointed hour to
the eompointed place
at wich time the
plctting of the doom
or al sophomores

'
, '
>. ., . .
k .
Q
9

k

HEAR YE
SOPHS!.
is an uprising

There

By HARLAND BRITZ
A year of loneliness and frustra-
tion may suddenly be turned into
a warm, date-filled season for
three University males who de-
cided to advertise.
The business-like trio, unsuc-
cessful in their attempts to meet
suitable upper-class women, and
undesirous of dating "the younger
set," decided Monday to put an ad
in The Daily for homecoming
dates and it now looks like they'll

Imported and Domestic
Christmas Cards 0
NOW ON DISPLAY!
INDIA ART SHOP
330 Maynard Street
IOi '!>S) )L O h ?Ce ) Q ?<- Omt< -yom ,

have women on their hands as
long as they remain on campus.
THEIR AD was a simple, single
column plea for upperclass wo-
men, who seriously wanted dates
for the big homecoming weekend.
Before the paper was on the
streets two hours, the phone calls
started coming and they're still
pouring in,
By dinner time last night, the
three had interviewed a dozen
of the applicants and were mak-
ing interviewing time for the
remaining 13 women who had
called.
The t h r e e, who demanded
anonymity when interviewed by
The Daily, reported that all but
two of the applicants were serious
and that only one had so far
stood them up on an interview.
They also cheerfully announced
that the group was "generally
comely, courteous and consider-
ate." In fact, the trio was happily
surprised by the beauty of many
of the applicants.
THE MEN have not as yet made
up their collective minds on which
of the lovelies they were going to
escort to homecoming festivities.
This will have to come later in
the week, after all of the women
are properlyinterviewed.

wil be known to

of the lowly servants,
the class of '54. Be it
here known that at
7:30/tonight at the li-
brary steps, measures
will e planned to
make these dogs
know their rightful
place at this instit"-
tion.

ye

stalwarts of the class
of '55.
DATE: TODAY
HOUR: 7:30 P.M.
PLACE:
HILL AUD. STEPS

(

" ;

____ U

t

EAST MEETS WEST
IN NEW RELAY EVENT
You've heard of the Penn Relays. But
have you ever heard of a relay where the
hurdles are mountains, the average stride
is thirty miles, and the track stretches
coast to coast?
It's the Bell System's Beteag
and it brings East and West together in
one of the most important events in the
history of communications.
Telephone construction crews have just
recently completed the coast-to-coast
6Zaa'eo-6Way system. Today, Long
Distance calls ride on radio microwaves,
beamed through the air from tower to
tower. And, for the first time, television
programs have been flashed from coast
to coast.
The new system supplements the thou-
sands of miles of wire cable that already
tie the nation together. It helps make
America's vast communications network
even stronger and more flexible. And it
could hardly happen at a better time. The
demands of defense are heavy and urgent.

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