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October 17, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1951

Students Leave Classes,
Run to Hunting Grounds

WARMHEARTED:
University Aids Motorcycling Mite
* * * * * *
By CAL SAMRA - -.

Arts Theatre Club Puts
Final Touches on Play

r

The fever has hit Ann Arbor,
hunting fever that is.
Leaving classes and studies be-
hind, student nimrods flocked to
the fields Monday as the annual
two-week small game hunting
season opened.
Shedding their traditional red
plaid outfits because of the unsea-
sonal heat, a number of University
faculty members and students re-
ported unusual success in their
pursuit of evasive Michigan game.
THE DIRECTOR of the fisheries
institute, Albert Hazzard, reported
success in the Portage Lake dis-
trict, as he bagged a rare wood-
cock. His associates, who did their
hunting in the Waterloo district
near Chelsea, also reported catch-
ing a few pheasants.
Not too many hunters were
spotted by Hazzard although
other areas reported large turn-
outs.
Don Coddington, '53D, who went
to Freeport, said that the pheas-
ants were unusually plentiful. Both
he and his companion, Dick Davis
got their two bird limits.
* * *
ANOTHER STUDENT, Lit Bac-
hos, '52 got his bird the hard way,
but lost another the easy way.
Bachos, who hunted in the Wa-
terloo area, grounded his first

ring-necked pheasant from 100
yards but then missed another
from an arm's length distance. He
blamed it all on "faulty marks-
manship."
BirdsHiding
As Pheasant
SeasonOpens
Predicted to begin with a bang,
the 1951 pheasant season got off
to a relatively slow start Monday
in the Washtenaw County area
with almost as many people get-
ting hit as birds.
Two Howell residents were re-
portedly beaten by hunters-one
while he was posting "No Hunt-
ing" signs, the other after asking
the hunters not to pick walnuts
on her property.
After the first two days of
hunting in unusually warm Octo-
ber weather, most hunters were
telling woeful tales of defeat des-
pite preseason predictions that
there would be more birds in the
fields this year than were present
last.
However, the weather man fore-
casts cooler weather which will
bring the birds out of hiding.

The STUDENT PLAYERS
A25-27 ct
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN

-Daily-Roger Reinke
CUSTOM-MADE DESK - Four
sets of pint-sized desks have
been intsalled in Miller's class-
rooms. Here he's shown in his
Spanish class.
Prof. Smith
Leaves City
Council Post
Prof. Russell A. Smith, secretary
of the Law School, has resigned
his post as alderman from the
seventh ward on the Ann Arbor
City Council.
In a letter to Council President
Cecil O. Creal, Prof. Smith ex-
plained that the press of other
duties would keep him from spend-
ing sufficient time as a council-
man.
* * *
PROF. SMITH had acted as
chairman of the Council's special
rent control and water committees
in addition to serving on the pub-
lic works and ordinance commit-
tees. He was recently named one of
four public members of the region-
al Wage Stabilization Board.
In resigning, Prof. Smith said
he might have time to attend
council meetings but would not
be able to spend additional time
with individual committees.
"In fairness to the other mem-
bers of the Council, I feel that I
must tender my resignation so that
someone may be appointed who
will be able to devote the required
amount of time," he wrote.
Prof. Smith's two-year term was
to have expired next April. Mayor
William L. Brown, Jr., will appoint
a substitute to fill the vacancy in
the near future.
Generation Prose
Deadline Extended
The deadline for literary con-
tributions to Generation has been
extended to Oct. 26, according to
Fred Levitt, fiction editor of the
magazine.
Short stories, poetry, drama, and
essays should be submitted to the
Generation office in the Student
Publications Building. Length of
material is unimportant and all
work will be given constructive
criticism whether used or not, Le-
vitt said.

All accusations to the contrary,
the University really does have a
heart.
The case of Gary Miller, '55, a
handicapped three-foot, eight-in-
cher, who has benefited through
the unselfish attention of this in-
stitution, pretty well proves it,
* * *
A RECENTLY-arrived freshman,
Miller himself would be the first
to admit the difficulty of adjust-
ing unaided to this educational
giant. It's no small feat for a six-
footer, much less for a student
the size of Miller, who has diffi-
culty getting around.
As it was, however, the Uni-
versity immediately took an in-
terest in the 16 year old mite's
problem and moved quickly. ,
Made-to-size-facilities, includ-
ing a desk, chair, and small
wardrobe, were hauled into Mil-
ler's Chicago House room in
West Quad.
When Miller complained he
couldn't reach the mirror, another
was brought in and installed at a
reasonable height-all of which
pleased the Detroiter very much.
THE NEXT STEP the University
took was to install four pint-sized
desks and chairs in Miller's class-
rooms.
Moreover, he was presented
with an honorary key to the An-
gell Hall elevator. Because the
elevator is rarely used even by
faculty members, Miller is en-
joying a rather singular pre-
rogative.
Naturally, he- was also confront-
ed with the problem of transpor-
tation. With unusual dispatch, the
University presented him with
driving and parking permits for
his specially-built car.
The car proved inconvenient,
however, so Miller's Chicago House
friends took over and obligingly
carried him to his destinations.
Now he's wending his way around
campus in a midget motorcycle.

Final rehearsals are now under-
way for the Arts Theater Club's
American premier performance of
"The Sulky Fire" by Jean-Jacques
Bernard, to open Friday.
Membership tickets for the sea-
son's four productions can be pur-
chased for $5.00 at Marshall's
Book Store, The Music Center,
Wahr's Book Store or at the thea-
ter office, 2091 /2E. Washington.
"The Sulky Fire" is a four-
character, one-set drama, which
the theater members feel is better
suited to the requirements of arena
theater than anything they have
attempted to date.
Three of the club's new mem-
bers, Paule Karell, Robin Good,
and Bob Laning, will appear in
the play. Dana Elcar will complete
the cast.
Friday's performance will open
a three week stand for the play,

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

with performances every night but
Monday. Members may attend
any of the performances which
are convenient, after first calling
the Arts Theater tog make reser-
vations.
Display Blanks Out
Application blanks for partici-
pation in the annual Homecoming
Display contest have been sent out,
Joe White, Student Legislature
public relations chairman, an-
nounced yesterday.
All housing groups should re-
ceive them soon and they must be
returned no later than next Mon-
day, White added.

I

Announcing the Premiere of another
Moeler-Epstein Musical Extravaganza
THE SMASHING SUCCESS?
'Diagonally Yours,'
'awith Bob Elliott's Orchestra
-- SOPH SATIRE
Bill Auditorium -- Saturday, Oct. 20
8:30 P.M. -- 50c

-Daily-Roger Reinke
OUT OF MY WAY--Chicago House outfitted Miller with his own
mirror, adjusted to his three-foot, eight-inch frame. Now and
then, however, he and his roommate, Abe Monier, get in each
other's way when they're grooming themselves.
READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

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