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October 12, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

d4

AG I THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1951

LETHARGIA:
Couples Say
.ifeaon Raft
Unromlantic
VICKSBURG, Miss.-IP)--After
85 days of cramped living on a
tiny raft, a couple pairs of young
unmarried people, three of them
University students, agree, "life
on a raft is not conducive to ro-
mance; we're more apt to resort
to murder."
The two men and two women
said that a lot of eyebrows have
been raised over their 1,800 mile
trip from New Kensington, Pa.
down the Allegheny, Ohio and
Mississippi Rivers to New Or-
leans.
-* * *
THEIR 20 BY 20 raft, mounted
on 12 oil drums, is topped by a
cabin 8 by 8 feet. A small in-
board motor propels the raft,
christened the "Lethargia."
The two girls sleep in double-
decked bunko on one side of the
cabin and the two men sleep in
double bunks about three feet
on the other side.
"We all sleep in our clothes,"
said Don Brown, 24 year old be-
whiskered University psychology
student, hurriedly explained.
AT ONE END of the cabin is a
two foot square space covered with
a Tarpaulin, which serves as
dressing room and toilet. The
river provides the plumbing.
When someone wants to take a
bath, he goes to the dressing
room, puts on his bathing suit and
goes over the side with a bar of
soap. Hot baths come in hotels
when they dock at various cities.
The "Lethargia" crew plans to
leave here today and hopes to
reach New Orleans via Natchez,
Miss. and Baton Rouge, La. in a
few weeks.
Union To Handle
FootballTickets
Students wishing to buy or sell
non-student tickets for Saturday's
football game will be accommodat-
ed by the Union ticket resale
service between 3 and 5 p.m. to-
day at the Union student offices
and from 9 a.m. to noon tomorrow
at the lobby ticket booth, accord-
ing to Union staffman, Bob Segal,
'54.
Bus Ad Balloting
Today is the final day for stu-
dents in the business administra-
tion school to cast their votes for
the new BusAd Council.
Five of the nine candidates for
seats on the council will be elected.

Giant Telescope Scans Sky

AHOY LANDLUBBERS:
Middies Christen New
'USS Little Wisconsin'

Campus Calendar

",

By JERRY HELMAN
The good ship USS Little Wis-
consin was christened with a bot-
tle of coke and launched on its
maiden cruise along the Diag at
7 p.m. yesterday as part of the
Midshipmen Club's initiation.
Replete with sixteen inch (long)
guns and complete running light
equipment the ship will continue
on its concrete-sea voyage for 24
hours. During this time, the crew
will be running the boat under
Standard Operating Procedure,
which means that the initiates
will have to keep a log book,
maintain a constant watch and
keep the craft in top running con-
dition.
* *
NAMED AFTER the USS Wis-
consin, which ran aground during
a midshipman training cruise last
summer, the ship was built in the
basement, a former morgue, of
North Hall. The ship measures
13 feet in length and is outfitted
according to Navy specifications.
While on duty, the neophyte
midshipmen must be prepared to
answer any question about the
Ticket Sales
For Lectures
End Oct.1l8

Navy asked them by a superior
officer.
And, as an added attraction, a
display of the dreadnought's full
fire power is promised between
noon and 1 p 3m. tomorrow.
cU' Displays
:ArtExhi ts
Currently being shown at the
University Museum of Art are the
exhibits "Seattle Drawings" and
"The Age of Enlightenment."
The "Seattle Drawings," which
will be on display until Oct. 21
consists of 42 items selected by
the Seattle Art Museum from the
papers and notebooks in the Seat-
tle area. The twelve artists repre-
sented are well known as painters
from their entries in the North-
west Annal and other exhibitions.
"The Age of Enlightenment,"
essentially a pictorial display of
the period in France from 1715
to 1793, will be on display until
Oct. 26.

.Events Today
Cowie Memorial Lecture - Dr.
John Coffey of Clinical Pediatrics
of Columbia University will speak
on "Normal Variants in the Heal-
thy Skeleton and their Diagnostic
Significance" at 4:15 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheater.
* * *
University Museums - Three
movies, "Operation of a Forest'
Nursery," "Forest Conservation"
and "The Forest Grows" will be
shown at 7:30 p.m. in Kellogg
Auditorium.
. * ,.
Trip to Jupiter-After a talk

entitled "Let's Go to Jupiter," t
7:30 p.m. in Rm. 3017 Angell Hall,
those who attend the visitor's
night sponsored by the astronomy
department will be able to go to
the observatory and view Jupiter
and the moon by telescope and bi-
noculars.
Corning Events
Industrial Design Lectures -
Buckminister Fuller, well-known
industrial designer willspeak on
"Problems in Comprehensive De-
sign," at 7:30 p.m: Monday and
Tuesday in the Architecture Aud-
itorium.

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING QUICK RESULTS

EYE TO THE MILKY WAY-T
ens used at the University's Port
areas of the sky, astronomers ar
T * *
At University's
By HELENE SIMON
Astronomers no longer need to
stand endless hours scanning the
sky for their observations when
they can use such equipment as
the camera and reflector tele-
scope available at the University's
Portage Lake Observatory.
One of the advantages of this
Schmidt type instrument is that
it encompasses a larger area in
its scope than most other tele-
scopes.
MOUNT PALOMAR Observa-
tory, possessing the largest tele-
scope in the world, also has
a Schmidt type scope.
Using prisms in the telescope
to discover information about
the stars is the most interest-
ing work done at the observa-
tory, according to Prof. Freeman
D. Miller.
The stars are recorded on the
film as small rectangles with lines
making a pattern through them.
Although these lines look like only

his far-seeing telescope is the mammoth photographer of the heav-
tage Lake Observatory. Because of its ability to photograph large
re able to stuly the relations of stars to each other.
peg Telescope BsigAtraction
Potg ak bsratr

COMPOSITIONS FOR STRINGED INSTRIMENTS

FINE NEW RECORDINGS

a series of pretty rainbows to the
ordinary onlooker, they are sig-
nificant to the astronomer. By
utilizing these patterns the train-
ed eye can figure out the temper-
ature of a star, its chemical com-
position and the distance between
stars and the earth.
ANOTHER interesting piece of
equipment at therobservatory is
an electrical device built by Wil-
Liam Legler, Grad., that measures
the brightness of the stars. The
light intensity is recorded on a
meter instead of on film.
The $260,000 Portage Lake
Observatory has been operating
Johns Appointed
To Union Council
Raffee Johns, Spec., has been
appointed to Union Junior Execu-
tive council by the senior officers.

now for about a year and a half.
It was financed by the Univer-
sity and the McGregor Founda-
tion of Detroit. The purpose of
the observatory is to promote
progress in research and to train
graduate students.
The University also has four
other observatories at Observatory
Till, Angell Hall, Pontiac, and
South Africa.

Student-priced series tickets for
the 1951-52 Lecture Course will
be sold at the Hill Auditorium Box
Office until 8:30 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 18, when Vice-President Al-
ben Barkley is scheduled to open
the series.
Single tickets for the Barkley
lecture will go on sale Wednesday
morning at the regular rate of
sixty cents for second-balcony
seats. Thursday is the last day
students will be able to purchase
series tickets at a special $2.40
rate.
Read Daily Classifieds

BACH: SONATA NO. 1 IN G-MINOR
Ossy Renardy, Violin

BARTOK: VIOLIN CONCERTO
Tibor Varga, Violin
Berlin Philharmonic, Fricsay conducting

DL 9545
_ . .585
LPS 423
4.95
DL 9544
5.85

BACH: SUITE NO. 2 IN D-MINOR
Suite No. 6 in D-Major
Lillian Fuchs, Viola

ii

BLOCH: SCHELOMO ML 4425
SAINT-SAENS: CELLO CONCERTO NO. 1 IN A-MINOR 5.45
Leonard Rose, Cello
New York Philharmonic, Mitropoulos conducting

MOZART: STRING QUARTET NO. 17
Loewenguth Quartet

DL 7517
3.85

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special
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The Grammar of Conducting by Max Rudolf
A Dictionary of Vocal Themes by Harold Barlor and
Sam Morgenstern
Beethoven-Nine Symphonies, Complete-Miniature
Orchestra Score
The Complete Oxford Piano Course
RethvenTavv-Pisti ts Vol . T II

III I BROWN SMOOTH LEATHER

ii

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