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October 10, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-10

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951

T HE M ICHIG AN JAILY

PAGE THREE

Yanks

Whip Giants,

-, Lopat 's Five-itter
* * "

I M TALKING...
6yZJ J4a enk

i'

INTRAMURAL FOOTBALL, that form of pigskin activity of which
even Robert Hutchins approves, is once again rolling along under a
lull head of steam. High Commissioner Earl Riskey has everything
squared away in anticipation. of exciting races in each of the four
circuits.
Despite the careful planning involved, several complaints have
been registered about various aspects of the gridiron competition.
One concerns the suitability of 15-yard penalties on a 60-yard
field. On a regulation field it would be the equivalent of a 25-yard
mark-off, which borders on the ridiculous. We move that the
maximum penalty inflicted be la yards.
Another source of grief for some participants is the timing sys-
tem employed on Ferry Field. All games start with a whistle blast
originating somewhere behind the Hoover Ball Bearing Works. Play
continues supposedly uninterrupted until another blast signals the
end of the half, 15 minutes later.
Two more toots on the siren begin and end the second half period
after a 10-minute pause at halftime. This type of timing leads to
a certain uniformity for all games and assures the IM officials that
thegames will end on time. However, it's rather rough on teams that
find themselves behind early in the contest.
Any delay, whether it be an argument, a consultation between
the referees, or just generally poor team organization, cuts into
the playing time the losing squad needs to come from behind. If
stop watches were used such interruptions would have no effect
on the actual playing time of each tilt.
We suggested this procedure to Earl Riskey, but he wisely pointed
out that the first-round games would not finish on schedule, in which
case the second-round teams would probably play the last half in
semi-darkness. What ital1 boils down to is that IM football needs more
room for more playing fields. Any suggestions should be directed to
Mr. Riskey.
* * * * -
Some Game.. .
* WE THOUGHT THAT WE had heard of just about everything
in the unusual concerning IM football, but the game between the For-,
esters and Phi Epsilon Kappa, professional athletic fraternity, took
all honors. Although the lumbermen were there ready to go, the ath-
letes did a fadeout. Only Paul Geyer, boy basketeer, and an unidenti-
#ied gymnast showed up for the match.
Somehow a forfeiture wasn't declared, and the "teams" prepared
to do battle. Thirty minutes later th eForesters staggered off the field
with a 6-0 win, but only after receiving the scare of their lives. Three
times the two-man Phi EK club marched to within the five-yard line,
' only to be turned back by the more numerous opposition
There is still room for four football teams in the Independent
League, according to high IM sources. Anyone interested should con-
tact either Earl Riskey or Rod Granbeau. Sign-ups and practices for
the IM cross country event are now in the offing. Five practices are
required to be eligible for competition.
Rumor has it that the first co-recreation night will occur Friday,
Oct. 19. For those couples interested in spending an athletic evening
together almost every facility, including swimming, badminton and
basketball, will be available. .

AP Names
Iowa Back
Week's Best
*
h11 Losin gCau ser
NEW YORK -()- A sopho-s
more halfback who lost no timee
learning the way to the goal line
in college football is the first As-
sociated Press back of the week'
for 1951.t
He's George (Dusty) Rice ofk
Iowa, who performed in spectacu-
lar fashion as his team bowed to
Purdue, 34-30, last Saturday.
JACK OVERMEYER of the In-
dianapolis Star said Rice started
a one-man show on the first play
of the game, racing 100 yards to
a touchdown with the Purdue
kickoff, and kept up the fireworks
throughout. Later, the soph star
scored after catching a pass on a
play covering 55 yards and made a
third touchdown on a. twisting
60-yard run from scrimmage.
His feats were adjudged the
most sparkling of the week after
a compilation of votes by sports-
writers and sportscasters across
the country.
Rice, a blond former state high
school tennis champion, surprised
the Boilermakers with his speed
on the kickoff return. After catch-
ing the ball on his goal, he took
one backward step and then flash-
ed down the righthand sideline to
score, slowing down only to spin
away from two Purdue tacklers1
at midfield.

Scribes Choose Putich
Top'' Player of Week
A brilliant offensive performance defenders. he veered sharply to his
in a losing cause has wvon for Billleft in a beautiful bit of briken-
Putich the title of "outstanding field running, sidestepping two In-
Wolverine" in last Saturday's dian backs, and raced unhindered
Michigan-Stanford football game. into the end zone.
A null o sf vt it.c , , " y li

men in attendance also designated
giant Bill McCoil. Stanford's pass-
snagging end, as top Indian play-
er on the field.
I'UTICII. PLAYING his first
full game in the all-important
tailback slot for Michigan, ran
brilliantly and passed almost as
well. The little senior from Cle ve-
.>* *

Earier, he had set up Michi-
gan's first 1951 ,touchdown by
firing a beautiful 32-yard pass
to Fred Pickard on Stanford's
7-yard line. Putich then called
an end-around with Lowell Per-
ry carrying which took Stanford
by surprise and netted the d.ol-
verines a touchdown.
He totaled 139 yards rushing
and passing out of Michigan's
total of 254 yards.
''IcCOLL, AN ALL-American se-
lection last fall, certainly looked
like he deserved those awards Sat-
urday. The 6'4" end, also captain
of his team like Putich, grabbed
seven of Gary Kerkorian's passes
for a total yardage of 142 yards.
His pass receptions xvere instru-
mental in all of Stanford's touch-
down marches.
Even more important, McColl
decoyed perfectly and when he
did receive a pass he knew exactly
what to do with it, invariably get-
ting extra yardage through the
Michigan defensive backfield.
MSC Named
,,
Nation1's First
NEW YORK iIP_ Undefeated
Michigan State barely retained its
position as the No. 1 football team
in the land yesterday, nipping
California's high-scoring Golden
Bears by a mere 10 points-or the
equivalent of one first-place vote
-in the second weekly Associated
Press poll of the season.
*
CALIFORNIA MADE its bid for
the coveted position by overwhel-
ming Minnesota, 55 to 14, in a dis-
play of brute power.
While California held its No.
2 slot on offensive might, Ten-
nessee retained its No. 3 post on
defensive strength.
All told, 112 sports writers and

American Leaguers Blast
Five Hurlers for 12 Safeties

- Continued rom Page ) '
only one Giant to reach .econd in
the last eight innings. That was
on catcher Wes Westrum's double
in the fourth, and Wes never saw
third. Lopat issued only one walk,
to Willie Mays to open the second
inning. He struck out three,
* * *
ONLY DARK and Irvin contin-
ued to thrive on Yankee hurling.
Each whacked a pair of singles
in a hopeless cause. Irvin's brace
ran his total for the five games
played to 11, tying the record for
safeties in a six-game series. The
most ever hit in any series was

12. by four different players, A
tremendous one-handed catch by
Gene Woodling in deep left-center
robbed Irvin of what looked like
a certain triple in the ninth.
Every player in the Yankee
starting lineup except Lopat feast-
ed on Jansen and his relievers.
Woodling belted a prodigious drive
to rightcenter in the ninth, but
was thrown out trying to stretch
it into a home run. Besides Jan-
sen and Kennedy, George Spencer,
Al Corwin and Alex Konikowski
felt the lash.
* * *
OFFICiAL BOX sCORE

ED LOPAT
..second five-hitter

Wolverines Seek New Backs
For Use as Injury Insurance

New York (A) A
Woodling, If
Ri~zzuto, ss
Berra, c
DiMaggio, cf
Mize, lb
Barier, rf
McDougald, 2-3b
Brown, 3b
Coleman, 2b
Collins, rf-lb
Lopat, p
TOTAlS 3

A
M3

BILL PUTICH
.'M" star of week
land gained a total of 79 yards
rushing and added 60 yards on of-

Coach Bennie Oosterbaan took
a long look at some hitherto "for-
gotten" backs during yesterday's
scrimmage indicating, that he
might come up with a surprise
or two in case of injuries or tough
going against Indiana Saturday.
It will be remembered, especial-
ly by Indiana, that last year an
unheralded Wes Bradford was
sprung on the Hoosiers, and the
diminutive scatback gained 105
yards rushing to lead Michigan to
a 20-7 victory.
WHILE BILL PUTICH, top left
halfback injured against Stanford,
should be ready by Saturday,
freshman Don Eaddy and 175-
pound Ted Kress worked out at
the tailback spot yesterday as
Putich took part in very little con-
tact work.
At right half, Don Oldham
has been reconverted from tail-
back to fill the shoes of injured
Frank Howell. Oldham is sup-e

plemented by Bradford and Bob
Hurley, an 185-pound fullback
who is being tried at wingback.
Ted Topor is generally consid-
ered the top man at quarterback,
but yesterday Topor saw relative-
ly little action in deference to Don
ZanFagna and freshman Duncan
McDonald, who looked good with
their passes.
* * *
ALTHOUGH FULLBACKS Tom
Witherspoon and Don Peterson
are rated one-two at that position,
Russ Rescorla, top Maize and Blue
place kicker, played a sizeable
share of offense at full.
The entire squad went through
a lengthy practice yesterday, di-
viding emphasis on pass offense
and defense.
Defensively the Wolverines start-
ed to patch up the aerial ramparts,
which were badly riddled by Stan-
ford's Gary Kerkorian last week-
end.

New York (N)
Stanky, 2b
Dark, ss
Thomson, 3b
irvin, If
Lockman, 1b
Mays, cf
Hartung, rf
Westrum, c
Jansen, p
A-Lohrke
Kennedy, p
B-Rigney
Spencer, p
Corwin, p
C-Williams
Konikowski, p
TOTALS

?
.3

B R
3 3
4 2
5 1
3 1
1 0
5 Y
3 0)
I 1
5 1
5 4)
39 73
B R.
4 4)
4 0
4 4
4 4)
3 4
3 0
3 0
1 4)
0 0)
1 0
o o
1 0
U 0
#) 0
31 1

O
1
2
9
z
x
7
1
4)
4)
0
0
0
27
3rd

0
5
0
3
3
7
0
2
27

A
0
6
0
A
0
0
3
1
0
2
14
A
0
0
0
0
I.

A-Struck out for Jansen

* * fense through passing,
ANOTIIER NOMINEE for the In addition, he played a finej
week's best back was- Hugh Mc- I game on defense and made set-
Elhenny of Washington, who eral key tackles.
matched Rice's run for distance The 5'9" Michigan captain av-
by returning a Southern Californ- eraged more than 6.5 yards per try
ia punt yar or a touch- rushing, and twisted 19 yards for
down.
The defensive backfield stars - There will be an 'M' Club
were not entirely overlooked by
the press box experts. Worth
Lutz, Duke's sensational freshman Room tonight. All letterw-
line backer, was named Southern --rsupeasecttend
Conference freshman of the week --'ud Holcome
for his defensive work as Duke
was overpowered by Tennessee, a touchdown on by far the out-
26-0. standing Wolverine offensive play!
of the game.

I
I
I
1
,
(,

B-Flied out for Kennedy in 5th
C-Grounded out for Corwin in 8th
NEW YORK (A)} 4b05 202 400 -13
NEW YORK (N)_100 020 000- 1
E-Woodling, Thomson, Irvin, Har-
tung. RBI-DiMaggio 3, McDougald
4, Rizzuto 3, Mize. 2B--Westrumn
Mize, DiMaggio. 3B-Woodling. HR-
IVeDougald, Rizzuto. DP-Lopat, MC-
Dougald and Mize. Left-New York
(A) 7; New York (N) 4.

rl
a

FOOT-BOWL
GAME
.
On the Diag
Today at Noon

f

E

ATO Swamps Zeta Psi, 34-0;
Delts Nip Phi Sigma Delta, 6-0

* *M in

Shutouts were the order of the
day in IM play yesterday, as the
victors in all seven league con-
tests blanked their opponents.
Alpha Tau Omega, sparked by
the running of Bruno Boelster and
the pass receiving of Don Thack-
ler, both of whom scored two
touchdowns, swamped Zeta Psi,
34-0.
' * * *
IN THIF DAY'S only close con-
test Delta Tau Delta beat Phi
Sigma Delta, 6-0. The emphasis
was on rough and bruising line
play. The only score came early
in the first half of a 30-yard pass
from Bill Mathews to Whit Saw-
yer.
Tau Kappa Epsilon romped
over Kappa Nu, 25-0. Alan'
Miyama, TKE back, starred,
making two long runs for touch-

PUITICII TOOK the ball on a broadcasters voted in this week's
direct snip from the center with poll, which saw the rest of the top
the backfield strong to the right. ten shape up as follows: 41-Texas
Behind several blockers he ran to A&M, 5-Notre Dame, 6-Texas, 7-
his right and headed for the side- Illinois, 8-Georgia Tech, 9-Ohio
lines. Cut off by four Stanford State, 10-Maryland.
- - - - - ._ _ . __ - - - - - _ __ - - - - -_. _ __ -_ _ _

downs. Bob Laterat passed for
two other touchdowns to com-
plete the scoring,
Phi Gamma Delta, led by the
running of Joe Middleton, took
the measure of Phi Kappa Tau,
34-0. Middleton ran for four of
the five Phi Gam touchdowns.
* * *
PSI UPSILON finished strong
to take the measure of Theta Chi,
18-0. Two touchdown runs by
Ralph Duan were the highlights
of the game.
Sigma Phi Epsilon passed for
all their scores as they routed
Theta Delta Chi 26-0.
Phi'Delta Phi whipped the Air
Force Grads, 27-0. Phi Delt
touchdowns were scored by the
running of Bill Clark and the
passing of Don Donaldson.

N
B.EGoodrich
Basketball Shoes
*F F a
Good basketball starts with good
feet. That's why so many coaches
specify B3. F. Goodrich "P-F" Basket.
ball Shoes for their players.
The X-ray shows how the scientific
featr "P-F" gusear ds ins la
your game, keeps you going at top
reed lonoer.

our sincerest

::::., ................. v; :.:::v. v;; ..
Camus neerviews on Cigarette Tests _.
.'.
,2:,
l isclss amuscaert te gthi notulo
;: .. ,.
cttco rtetet.Itdd' tk imln o3i u
hi '
the fat thatcigarete midness an't b deterined
byamr inl ufo qiksif xeiet
*~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Milos fsokronadof h cmu, aedicy
erdteesonyoetu ts fcgret ides
k. ',* . s

i

E

They're the choice
of the experts, these
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Only Van heusen
Oxfords can boast
such famous sewman-
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in-action. Scout ou t.
some of these
Van Heusen Oxfords and
score a touchdown for good
looks on the campus!

For the error of

the illustration in

our

Sunday "Daily" ad.

Our ad writer confesses that his mind

was

bouncing between Dagmar and Jane Rus-
sell when he was trying to get the message
across on the wonderful-wonderful deal
we have i n
$1.59 eac
FOR T HE BIGG EST BUYS SH OP

a11l-

American Oxfords
by Van Heusen
REG$ T
a $4.50

i-

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