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October 09, 1951 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-09

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1951

AE F'TTU

T IlE MTI CHIGA N D AILY

V11111'! 1"VVLY 111 "i tia a+. .aaa a -

ORATOR OR ENGINEER?

Last Rites

Classic Atmosphere

Stump Speakers To Meet
4* - - - *

By MIKE SHERER
Somebody once said engineers
don't know how to write or to
speak in public, but there is a
group of engineers, known, as the
Stump Speakers Society, who will
dispute that point.
In fact, the group, formally
named Sigma Rho Tau will debate
about almost anything, and usu-
ally win.
Tonight, Sigma Rho Tau will
hold a "rushing" smoker for any
engineers interested in learning
the lively art of debating at 7:30
p.m. in rooms 3K, L and M of the
Union.
* * *
SPEAKING ON the importance
of speech to an engineer will be
Prof. Alfred H. Lovell, head of the
electrical engineering department.
Informnation on Sigma Rho
Tau will be given to speech-con-
scious engineers at the smoker.
If they, are interested, they may
become "pledges," according to
Don Walker, secretary.
Although there is no physical
pledge training asin social fra-
ternities, Sigma Rho Tau pledges.
take part in debating contests and
other society functions for one
semester.
FOR INITIATION the candi-
date must give two public ora-
tions, one two minute extempor-
aneous speech before the West
Engineering Bldg. and a two-
minute planned speech from the
"stump" behind the building. Ac-
tive members make the pledge's
job harder during these two
speeches by'"standing around and
heckling the orator..

To Be Held
For Kello
By The Associated Press
Well-known philanthropist and
manufacturer Will Keith Kellogg
will receive the last respects today
of the community which he made
famous, Battle Creek, and the
thousands w h o m his Kellogg
Foundation have benefited.
Kellogg, who died Saturday, was
noted for his contributions to the
University, among which is the
Kellogg Institute for Graduate
Dentistry, and his contributions to
the public health school alone to-
tal nearly $1,000,000.
* * *
INSPIRED BY Herbert Hoover's
child welfare work, Kellogg was
given impetus to found the Kel-
logg Foundation to aid children
of all backgrounds. This work led
to scientific contributions serving
not only children but also their
parents.
In Ann Arbor, Dean of thepub-
lic health school H. F. Vaughn
said, "In the loss of W. K. Kellogg,
the children of this country have
lost a good friend and one who
had a sympathetic interest in
their problems."

W'HERE'S COOKIE?
Dorm Phone Confusion
Hits New Campus Peak

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
BEER AND PHILOSOPHY MIX AT BULLRING
d*s c yr
Congregate at .Bullring

-Daily-Mike Scherer
POINTED ARGUMENT--Jackie Bergey, '53A, brushes up on her
parliamentary procedure with Sigma Rho Tau debators Bill Nelle,
53E, and Don Walker, '52E. Every year the Sigma ,Rho Tau
has several debate engagements with women from Michigan
State Normal College.

By HELENE SIMON
In a university as large as this,
it's seldom that students get a
chance to sit down and just talk
about anything with their in-
structors. ,

S* * *
Among other contests, several
times a year the Michigan
chapter of Sigma Rho Tau
sponsors debating contests with
women students from Michigan
State Normal College in Ypsi-
lanti.
Although tradition has it that
women always have the last word,
the Ypsilanti team have won only

once in the past two years. On
that occasion they were arguing
the affirmative on "Should Wo-
men Be Permitted the Right to
Debate?"
An annual function of the
Michigan Sigma Rho Tau chapter
is the Tung Oil Banquet, at which
the outstanding senior speaker is
awarded a cane which belonged to
the late Dean Mortimer Cooley.

t
t

Fast locks
Dupe South
South Quad is having troubles
again-this time with clocks that
are 10 minutes fast.
"It's just one of those routine
things that's inconveniencing
some of the boys," Francis Shiel,
Director of Service Enterprises, ex-
plained yesterday.
"Everything mechanical over
there needs adjustment. It's to be
expected in a new dormitory."
* * *
PETER OSTAFIN, resident di-
rector of the Quad, said he
thought it was "very sad" that the
students should be inconvenienced.
One South Quad resident ob-
served, "If you synchronize your
watch with the Quad clocks you're
early to class, and if you synchro-
nize it with campus clocks you're
late to lunch."

Socks Banished
From Windows
"Does a pair of argyle socks de-
tract from the over-all Gothic
beauty of the Lawyers Club?"
This question arose recently
when Dave Belin, '54L, was told
to take down a pair of socks he
had drying in his window. A maid
found the offending argyles, red
and yellow diamonds on a bright
green background, when she en-
tered Belin's room to clean it.
She informed him that it was
against a longstanding rule of the
Club to hang clothing in the win-
dows. Miss Inez Bozorth, director
of the Lawyers Club, confirmed
this, adding that a pair of stock-
ings hanging in a window was
not in keeping with the general
appearance of the club.
Belinwhose window faces S.
University St. opposite the Presi-
dent's home, was "surprised and
amazed" when the maidrtold him
of the rule. In his opinion, "they
were good-looking socks, and even
added to the appearance of the
building." But he said he would
comply with the rule, since he
plans to remain at the Lawyers
Club for two more years.

t

The Bullring, an organization'
devoted to the cause of getting
faculty members and students to-
gether in an old-fashioned, So-
cratic discussion over a glass of
beer, provides that opportunity
*' * *
THERE COULD be no atmos-
phere more opposite from a class-
room's than the noisy, smokey in-
terior of the Huron St. restaurant
where the Bullring meets every
Friday night. a
Here and there celebrities and
campus pedagogues can be
found, partaking in the free dis-
cussions. And now and then a
raucous student voice pipes up.
All in all, everyone admittedly.
has a good time-that is, if you're
21 and can discuss on a reasnoable
intellectual level.
THE BULLRING was founded
in the fall of 1949 by Prof. Austin
Warren of the English department,
and Prof. Carl D. LaRue, of the
botany department, at the sug-
gestion of Prof. Hayward Kenis-
ton, then dean of the literary col-
lege.
Prof. Keniston felt that the
'lack of contact between students
and faculty and between faculty
of the various departments ne-
cessitated. the club.
Yesterday Prof. Warren explain-
ed that the Bullring is "clear of
political tones. It is not an organi-
zation meant to help people move
up in their departments."
Stolen Clothes
Foaund in B.ush
More than half of the $50C
worth of clothing stolen from twc
cars parked in adjoining Univer-
sity parking lots Saturday nighi
has been recovered.
An Ann Arbor garbage collectoa
found all the missing women'.
clothing, valued at $325, in the
bushes across from the Unior
parking lot yesterday morning.
Still missing is the men's cloth-
ing valued at $200. One car way
parked in the Administratiol
Building parking lot and the other
in the Union parking lot.
The thief gained entrance t<
the cars by forcing open their
vent windows.

By MARGE SHEPHERD
Phone Connections with the'
women's dorms are worse now than
last year, according to Leonard H.
Schaadt, residence halls director.
Three main reasons are respon-1
sible for the increased inadequacy
Enrollment ll
Increas es
Add Facilities,
New Instructors
By JERRY HELMAN
An increase in freshman enroll-
ment in the University ROTC unit
of over 250 per cent has resulted in
an enlargement of classroom facili-
ties and instructor personnel, ac-
cording to figures released by the
ROTC yesterday.
The increased raised to 1428 the
amount of students enrolled in the
three divisions of the ROTC. Of
these, 650 are freshmen, 271 sopho-
mores, 257juniors and 243 seniors.
* * *
CLASSROOM facilities were en-
larged by the addition of sections
of the Temporary Clasroom Bldg.,
while 20 new instructors were add-
ed to the ROTC family to handle
the incoming cadets.
Leading the way in total in-
crease in enrollment and facili-
ties is the Air Force ROTC which
has risen in two years from the
smallest of the three ROTC un-'
its on campus to the largest.
This year's freshman cadet class
numbered 420 men, nearly a ten-
fold increase over last fall.
Classroom facilities in North
Hall have been enlarged and, in
addition, more training aids, desks,
library facilities and lounge rooms
have been added.
* * *
THE ARMY ROTC's total en-
rollment figure, including students
enrolled in the medical and denta
ROTC programs, is 521 students
which includes 188 freshmen.
Both the classrooms and head-
quarters of th unit have been
moved to the TCB, with the Air
Force and Navy ROTC occupy-
ing its old quarters in North
Hall.
New facilities include a signa
corp laboratory, a map reading
room, and an enlarged rifle range
which is used by all the ROTC
units.
Showing only a slight increase
0 in enrollment over last year, the
o Navy ROTC now has 276 mid
- shipmen.

of phone service this year, Schaadt
said.
* * *
FIRST OF ALL, the problem, he,
said, is always worse in the fall.
because people calling into the
dorms often don't know the dorm
or room number of the person
they are calling.
Some amen don't even know
the name, and expect the opera-
tor to locate a five-foot-two
blond named Cookie. Although
it takes only a few seconds for
the woman at the switchboard
to explain to the anxious male
that she couldn't possibly know
who the co-ed i,s when multi-
plied by several times per night,
a lot of time is wasted.
Especially poor conditions pre-
vail this year because only cane.
experienced dorm switchboard'op-
erator is left, and six new opera-
tors on other boards than those
handling dormitory calls. A de-
lay in calls and an increased num-
ber of errors result, Schaadt
added.
HOWEVER, this will be a tem-
porary difficulty, he said, since
the new operators are already get-
ting accustomed to the new board.
The third possible reason for
phone troubles, Schaadt said,
may be that since men of the
South Quad have private phones
in their rooms, they are mak- I
ing more phone calls than they
usually would.
Although extensive research has
been made by Schaadt and tele-
phone technicians from Detroit,
no steps to alleviate the situation
have been taken as yet,
A VOLUMINOUS amount of pa-
per has been filled with statis-
tics concerning the date and time
of calls placed, the number of
calls, to whom, how long the call
took to be placed over the number
of seconds it should have taken,
and whether or not the call was
completed.
The decision, based on the3sta-
tistics, is that the only effective
remedy would be to have a phone
in each dormitory room, as is the
case in the new South Quad, he
s said.
1 When asked if there were any
, possibility of doing this now,
Schaadt said that there are no
definite plans to do so although
all dormitories are entitled to
equal service.
Choose Officers
L Newly elected members of the
g University Choir Student Execu-
e tive Committee, repre~nting the
Women's Choir, the Michigan
Singers and the Men's Choir, are:
e Connie Shephard, Edward Baigg-
e hard, Arthur Jones, Grace Rave-
- sloot, Ilavid Tice and Mary Cath-
erine Hutchins.

TYPEWRITERS

°

INITIAL SPEAKER-Vice Pre-
sident Alben W. Barkley will de-
liver the first address of the
1951 Lecture Course, Oct. 18, on
the non-political subject "Cross.
roads of Democracy." Special
$2.40 season tickets are avail-
able to students and student
wives at the Hill Auditorium
box office.
'Ensian To Hold
Diag Sale Today
The Michiganensian will hold a
campus sale on the diag today,
Dave Palmer, 'Ensian Promotions
Manager announced.
'Ensians may be purchased for
$5.00 and senior picture appoint-
ments may be made at the same
time.
Senior picture proofs will be re-
ceived from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. this
week and next on the first floor
of the Student Publications Build-
ing. Orders for pictures will be
taken when the proofs are re-
turned.

Pla nsMee ting
The University Post of the
American Ordnance Association
will hold their first meeting of the
semester at 7:30 p.m., Thursday,
in Rm. 3-A of the Union.
Although composed mostly of
ROTC students enrolled in the
ordnance curriculum, engineering
experts 1and local manufacturers,
any student, particularly those in
the engineering school, may join
the nationwide organization. Stu-
dent membership is three dollars
per year.
* * *

toaesWinhewie, ot.er3-0.Na
banal Wine Wek, Oct. 13-20

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STUDENT SUPPLIES
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Accepted on Supplies Only
Webster-Chicago Wire Recorders!
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PLEDGE BUTTONS - RECOGNITION PINS
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Two Operas
To Be Given
Two one-act operas by student
composers in t h e University's
School of Music will be presented
at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in Barbour
Gym's Sarah Caswell Angel Hall.
Operas to be given will be "The
Brass Ring" by William D. Petter-
son, and "Circus" by Edward M.
Chudacoff.
"The Brass Ring" is concerned
with a barker, Sam, who must
find a new leading lady - when
Shaharazade quits his show.
Jean, the girl he auditions, is
dazzled by' the future Sam paints
but finds it difficult to choose
between the boy she loves and the
wonders of life with a carnival.
Chudacoff's opera, "Circus,''
which will occupy the second
half of the program tells the
story of a circus clown "tortured
by the constant danger in which
his beloved, a tightrope-walker,
performs. When she refuses to
give it up, he kills her in despera-
tion.

ONE OF FOUR such college
posts in the country, the Univer-
sity's AOA group is part of an or-
ganization which has contributed
much to the country's war effort
in the past decade.
One of the most notable con-
tributions of the AOA in recent
years was the development of
the 3.5 inch bazooka which was
credited with stopping the Com-
munist Korean offensive by
knocking out their Russian built
tanks.
The "miracle" of the 3.5 inch
bazooka is that it wasndeveloped,
put into production, and shipped
to the front lines in twenty-five
days. This was made possible by
the combination of ingenuity and
industrial know-how that the AOA
is famous for.
When an ordnance problem is
presented to them by the Army,
the AOA refers it to one of their
committees for development. The
speed and efficiency with which a
solution is given has earned them
the title of the 'Know-How Club.'
FOOT-BOWL GAME

C'ampus
Events Today
Members of Panhellenic will
hold their weekly meeting at 5
p.m. in the League.
* * *
THE MICHIGAN Dames will
hold their first meeting of the
season at 8 p.m. in the Rackham
Assembly Hall.
m * *
Coming Events
A mass meeting for all those
interested in working on com-
mittees for Sophomore Cabaret
will be heldhat 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
day in the League Ballroom.
* * *
PROF. DOUGLAS D. Crary, of
t h e geography department, a
member of Prof. George G: Cam-
eron's recent expedition to the
Near East will be interviewed on
WUOM'shcampus news program
at 4 p.m. tomorrow. Crary will
discuss the present Anglo-Iranian
oil dispute, and will give some of
his experiences while living with
an Arab tribe in the Tigris-Eu-
phrates swamp region.

RAYON BENGALINE

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