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February 24, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILYA

U
LTURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1951

Summer 12
Week Plan
Abandoned
Acting on the results of a sur-
vey of Michigan high schools Uni-
versity officials decided yesterday
against extending the Summer
Session from eight to 12 weeks
for freshmen.
T h e survey, taken among
schools which produce 30 per cent
of the high school graduates in
the state, revealed that there
would be little interest in a long-
er Summer Session, Prof. Harold
Dorr, director of the Summer Ses-
sion, said.
The 12-week summer program
was designed to enable incoming
students to complete college with-
in three years. University offi-
cials pointed out, however, that in
previous years students have been
able to get a degree by attending
at least three Summer Sessions
and three academic years.
The longer session for freshmen
will be started only if a national
emergency requires it, Prof. Dorr
added.
Special provisions for freshmen,
designed to encourage them to
start in June rather than in Sep-
tember, will include an orienta-
tion program, counseling, special
classes, special housing and a
physical education program, he
said.
The regular summer programs
lasting six and eight weeks will
be given from June 25 to Aug. 10
and the number of credit hours
will be limited to eight as in pre-
vious years.
Union Addition
May Include
Book Store
A Union-operated student book-
store is possible, Union student
officers said yesterday, if the Re-
gents permit its inclusion in the
Union's planned new wing.
The Union's opinion came as a
partial reply to the proposal of
Dave Belin, '51, in the Student
Legislature this week that the
Union sponsor a long-sought, stu-
dent-owned bookstore.
"The idea certainly will be
looked into further," Jerry Mehl-
man, '51, Union president, said,
"but in any case it cannot be put
into operation until the new addi-
tion is completed."
Belin said he brought up his
resolution at this time because he
wished to give local bookstores
sufficient notice so that they
would not be caught with large
stocks on hand.
Belin said he thought Regents
approval could be obtained.
"It's already been done at other]
Michigan universities. Moreover,
we think we can prove to the Re-
gents that students on this cam-
pus are being overcharged forI
their books and supplies," Belin
added.
Both Mehlman and Belin agreed
that the problem would be dis-
cussed at a forthcoming meeting
of student leaders and the Re-
gents.
Prints Available '
Students who wish to rent
prints from the Art Prints Loan1

Collection may do so from 9 a.mo
to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday
in Rm. 510, Administration Build-
ing.
Students who have reserved
prints and not picked them up;
may do so at the same time. l

All Work, No Play

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
JUST TOO BUSY-Strongwilled stagehands stuck to their jobs yesterday despite the obvious charms
of Gulantics contestant Phyllis Seput, '52E, a blues singer. The stage hands admitted that it was
tough keeping their minds on their work while Phyllis rehearsed. She is one of the 10 student acts
that will try for $175 in prizes at 7:30 p.m. today in Hill Auditorium. The show will feature two
mystery acts staged by faculty members.
PROTOCOL INTERFERES:
SL Wants Flagpole To Fly UN Flag

Report HST
May Run for
Senate in'52
WASHINGTON - (P) -- The
White House kept silent yesterday
on reports that President Truman
may run for his old Senate seat
when his term expires Jan. 26
1953.
- But Attorney General J. How-
ard McGrath appeared skeptical.
Emerging from a cabinet meet-
ing at the White House, McGrath
was told of the reports circulat-
ing on Capitol Hill.
"Would you buy that?" a re-
porter asked.
McGrath smiled. "No," he said
and walked away.
WHITE HOUSE press secretary
Joseph Short said he had no com-
ment.
However, old friends of
President Truman in Congress
said he is seriously considering
a return to the Senate where
he spent 10 happy years. One
Congress member, who declined
to be quoted by name, put it
this way:
"If Harry Truman does what.
he really wants to do he will run
against Senator Kem (R-Mo) in
the 1952 election. He really loves.
the Senate."
SEVERAL White House callers
have privately quoted the Presi-
dent as hinting he will not seek
another term in the executive
mansion. They say he sometimes
talks nostalgically about return-
ing to the Senate.
President Truman will have
served nearly eight years in the
White House when his present
term expires. He stepped up
from the vice-presidency Apr.
12, 1945, after the death of
President Franklin Roosevelt.
Whatever President Truman's
plans may be. no definite an-
nouncement is expected in the
immediate future. Most observers
believe he will not 'make up his.
mind whether to run for another
term until early next year.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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WANTED: One flagpole that
would do justice to a United Na-
tions flag.
Lack of a suitable flagpole has
presently stymied the efforts of
the Student Legislature to have
a UN flag flown on campus.
S* *
THE MOST OBVIOUS place on
campus to fly the flag would seem
to be from the main flagpole on
the north side of the Diagonal.
But the facts of flag protocal have
ruled out that site.
An American flag flies from
the main flagpole. A state reg-

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ulation says that it must be
flown there on every school day
in the year. American flag pro-
tocal rules out the possibility of
flying the UN flag above it.

According to the rules which
govern the flying of the UN flag,
it must be as large as any accom-
panying flag and not flown below
any other flag. So the American
flag will continue to have undis-
puted possession of the main flag-
pole.
'p * *
AN INVESTIGATION by Ken
Babcock, '53, of SL's Campus Ac-
tion Committee, revealed that
there are no other suitable flag-
poles on campus from which the
UN flag might be flown.
Refusing to scrap the project
on such thin grounds, the CAC
has commissioned legislator Bill

McIntyre, '53, to seek out an
appropriate flagpole and to find
out whether it could possibly be
transplanted to a campus loca-
tion.
If such a feat were possible,
Vice-President Marvin Niehuss
said that the project would prob-
ably require the approval of the
Board of Regents.
Approval would be necessary
because the transplanted flagpole
would probably be in the category
of a gift to the University and the
Board has to officially accept all
gifts.
Trytten Gets Post
Prof. John Trytten, of the edu-
cation school and principal of
University High School, has been
elected president of the National
Association of Business Teacher
Training Institutions.

.Deans Term
'Work' Plan
Experimental
(Continued from Page 1)
will be reviewed by all the ap-
propriate authorities."
On Wednesday Dean Bacon out-
lined and discussed the new plan
t a meeting of the Board of Rep-
resentatives, which is made Up of
representatives of all' campus
women. At that time she dis-
tributed the copies of the proposed
regulations to the presidents of
the women's housing units.
S* s
IT WAS THROUGH this dis-
cussion and the copies that the
plan received its first wide pub-
licity on campus.
The deans would not say how
soon the final decision would be
made on whether the plan is
adopted permanently or not, but
thought that it would be a num-
ber of months at least.
One of the considerations which
will determine the final disposi-
tion of the plan, they explained,
would be reports from the two
students who have been punished
under it, giving their views on the
plan.
The Deans indicated that,
though the plan is not official
University policy, it is possible
that other students may be pun-
ished under it while it is still in
an experimental stage.
But they again emphasized that
this was not a hard and fast rule
as yet. They said that each case
would be considered on its merits
and disposed of as they thought
best.

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FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State & Williams
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr D.D.
Student Ministry: Rev. H. L.. Pickerill;
Mrs. George Bradley
Director of Music: Wayne Dunlop
Organist: Howard R. Chose
9:30 and 10:45 A.M.: Depts. of Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Public worship. Dr. Parr will preach
on "The Idol Breaker," the third of the Lenten
Series: "Old Pictures in Modern Frames."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild Supper program at
Memorial Christian Church.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill at Tappan Street
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
9:30 A.M.: Church School-College Age Class.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (nursery for chil-
dren). Sermon: "Allies of Hope."
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Jean Garee Bradley, Associate
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 supper followed by a
discussion of program interests.

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FRIENDS MEETING
Lane Hall Lbrary
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome!
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
504 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Crystal Cuthbert, Assistant Student Counselor
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship "Brotherhood."
6:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild at Guild House.
Cost Supper and film program "How Jews
Worship."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Group-Mr. Paton Crouse of
American Friends' Service Committee: "The
Quaker Experience in Communist China."
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship-Rev. Edward H.
Redman preaching on: "Natural Science or
Myth?"
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Students--Mr. Lloyd Ber-
ridge from Student Health Service on: "Person-
ol Problems of Students,"
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Services in Zion and Trinity Churches.
5:30 P.M.: LSA Meeting in Zion Parish Hall-
Program follows at 7:00. Miss Frances Dy
singer will speak-"The Church's Challenge
to Its Students."
Tuesday, 7:30 P.M.: Special Interest Class at the
Center-History of the Lutheran Church ,in
America.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.

A.
A

GAtGOY l

r'

announces

THE GARG GIRL.
PHOTO SURVEY
PURPOSE-To Find The New GARG GIRL

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Sub ject--~Mind."
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
Ths room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
9:45 A.M.: Lenten Class in Religion for students.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon's Len-
ten sermon "Operation Crossroads."
5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guildsupper.
6:30 P.M.: Dr. John Morley will speak on "Re-

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

ONLY MALE STUDENTS may sponsor an entry.
She must be a Michigan Co-ed.
The name and a snapshot of the girl you sponsor must
be mailed or brought to the GARGOYLE office (Pub-
lications Bldg.) by MARCH 2. (ALL SNAPSHOTS
TO BE RETURNED.)

t1

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER

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