100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 01, 1951 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JUNE 1, 1951

IDMINISTRATION ACTS:
Cheating in Lit School
Subject to Punishment

By ANN HAGAN

'S

A reported increase in cheating
in the literary college has caused
Assistant Dean James H. Robert-
son to announce publicly a crack-
down policy by the college's Ad-
ministration Board.
The upsurge in cheating during
the last four weeks, allegedly be-
cause of the-finals "clutch," has
kept an Administrative Board sub-
committee in weekly meetings with
as many as six cases at a time-on
the agenda.

THE COMMITTEE, headed by
Dean Robertson and composed of
three student judiciary councilmen
and three faculty members, holds
that intellectual dishonesty is one
of the most serious offenses a stu-
dent can commit.
"Students must pay a penalty
for intellectual dishonesty, but
we make every effort to have
that experience as constructive
as possible," Robertson said.
Professors and instructors are
expected to report all cases of
academic dishonesty to the as-
sistant dean's office. The student
accused, whether it be of cheating
or plagiarizing, talks with Dean
Robertson.

Alumni U'
To Be Held
This Month

IN AN 1
into the r
is sent toI
with a p;

The annual Alumni University, Afterward
attended by all interested Univer- the comm
sity Alumni, will be held from June the two k
11 to 16. you do? ar
The series of eight lecture Punish
courses will be held in conjunction frankly t
with the reunions of every fifth his offen
University class from the class of sight he
'06. These Alumni reunions are for it. T
operated by their class officers and only if a
are financed by each class. basic pro
The Golden Anniversary classes ably exj
will also meet and will be inducted openly a
into the Emeritus Club. on the
A luncheon, to be held at noon, case, the
June 16 in Waterman gymnasium, ment ran
will conclude the week's Alumni an 'E' on
activities. At this time President "We fee
Alexander Ruthven will speak and is educati
distinguished alumni awards will ertson sai
be presented. student t
All Alumni will register for the haps for t
week's activities at 9:00 a.m., June derstand
11, in the Rackham lobby. pressure."

EFFORT to gain insight
eason for his action, he
Health Service for a talk
wofessional psychologist.
Is he is ready to go before
ittee, which in turn asks
key questions: What did
nd why did you do it?
ment depends upon how
the student owns up to
ase and how much in-
shows into the causes
he Board believes that
student recognizes his
blems can he be reason-
pected to solve them
nd honestly. Depending
circumstances of each
Board imposes punish-
nging from expulsion to
a paper.
.l that this whole system
onally justifiable," Rob-
id, "because it forces a
o look at himself, per-
he first time, and to un-
how he works under

Cam pus
calendar
Events Today
University Museums -- "Life in
Tropical America" will be the sub-.
ject of the Uhiversity Museums'
program starting at 7:30 p.m. ins
Kellogg Auditorium.
* * *
Coming Events
Architecture Exhibition-An Ar-4
chitecture exhibition featuring de-1
signs by faculty members of theI
College of Architecture and De-
sign is being held through June 61
at the Architecture Building.
* * *
Drum Major Contest -- The
Third Annual University Drum
Major Contest will be held from
1 to 5 p.m. tomorrow at Ferry
Field when approximately sixty
drum majors and majorettes com-
pete for honors.
* * *
"Up In Arms"-The movie "Up
in Arms" will be shown by the
Union free of charge to the entire
campus at 8 p.m. Wednesday in
the Union Ballroom.
* * *
Summer Institute - The 1951
Summer Institute will be held this
year from June 25 to June 28.
Sponsored by the Law School, the
Summer Institute will center on
the general subject, "Taxation of
Business Enterprise."
* * *
Nursing Institute-An institute
on the "Nursing Aspects of Atomic
Warfare," will be held for all
graduate nurses in Washtenaw
County from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the School of Public
Health Auditorium.
Science Research Banquet-The
Science Research Club will hold its
forty-ninth annual banquet at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the League
Ballroom.

FANTASY FIGURES-Bethel Leslie, star of James M. Barrie's
fantasy "Mary Rose" and featured player Ray Boyle practice for
a routine in the show. The fourth Drama Season play, "Mary Rose"
will open Tuesday at Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
* * *~ 4
Bethel Leslie Deplores
'Half -Flop' Performance

The climax of this year's grad-
uation ceremonies will be reached
Saturday, June 16, when Ralph
Johnson Bunche delivers the com-
mencement address to 4,000 Uni-
versity seniors.
Bunche is known throughout
the world for his efforts. on behalf
of world peace. He was a mem-
ber of the United States delega-
tion to the Dumbarton Oaks con-
ference and has been active in
the UN since its formation.
HE WAS appointed assistant to
Count Folke Bernadotte, UN me-
diator in Palestine, and after Ber-
nadotte's assassination he took
over the job himself.
In 1950 Bunche received the
Nobel Peace Prize for this work
in Palestine, becoming the first
Negro ever to gain the honor.
The commencement ceremonies
will honor gradates from the
summer session of 1950 and the
fall and spring sessions in 1951.
The exercises will begin at 5 p.m.,
and will be held in the University
Stadium if the weather permits.
Yost Field House will be the scene
of the activities if the weather is
bad,
The graduates will assemble
at 4:15 p.m. and march into the
stadium at 4:30 p.m. In case of
rainy weather, the fire whistle
will blow between 3:30 p.m. and
3:40 that afternoon and faculty,
Play To Be
Given on TV
. A Russian comedy, "The In-
spector General," will be presented
by speech students on an hour
long television drama at 10:15 p.m.
June 2 over WWJ-TV.

EXERCISES ARRANGED:
Ralph Bunche To Give.
Commencement Talk

regents, deans and graduates
will gather in the places previ-
ously assigned.
Spectators will enter the main
gate of the stadium and are asked
by commencement officials to be
in their seats by 4:30 p.m. when
the graduates will march in. The
stadium will be open to all spec-
tators.
However, if the exercises are
held in Yost Field House, tickets
will be required. Two tickets will
be issued to each graduate and
may be picked up today through
June 1 at the Cashier's Office in
t h e Administration Building.
Spectators are asked to enter Yost
Fiera House by the StateStreet
entrance.

0

'Tight Little
Island' To Be-
Shown Again
A light comedy designed to off-
set exam worries will be shown to-
day and tomorrow at Hill Audi-
torium when the Arts Cinema
Guild presents "Tight Little Is-
land" for the second time this
semester.
"The picture has been brought
back because it was so well re-
ceived at the last showing, and
because we believe that many stu-
dents did not get the opportunity
to see it the last time," Dick
Krause, president of the Art Cine-
ma Guild explained.
The performances will be shown
at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Tickets will
cost 50 cents.

I

C

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
A flop play that folds after one
day or a week isn't nearly as bad
as a half-flop which drags along
for a while leaving the actors
wondering when the last perform-
ance will be. Bethel Leslie, petite
star of "Mary Rose" said yester-
day.
"It's very frustrating to the cast,
and always leaves us feeling that
the play should have been better

of that it should just quickly fold
its wings and go away."
* * * ,
YOUNG MISS LESLIE, a veter-
an of seven years on the stage,
plays the title role she enacted on
Broadway in the James M. Bar-
rie fantasy which will open at Lyd-
ia Mendelssohn Theatre Tuesday.
The story of a girl bewitched by
an island, it has been called the
most "endearing and enchanting
production of the theatrical sea-
son" by the critics.

"It's such a delightful play we
have a lot of fun putting it on,"
jE Miss Leslie said.

LATEST

Longl-Playing Records

A native New Yorker, Miss Les-
lie got her start in "Snafu" when
she was 14 years old, after a chance
meeting with playwright-producer
George Abbot.
"I HAD WANTED to act since
I was six, but I never expected to
start as soon as I did. I don't know
exactly why I had such an ambi-
tion," she admitted, "but I've never
been sorry."

I

'The Jtuic Center
WISHES YOU ALL
A VERY PLEASANT

LAUDATE DOMINUM-TRAPPIST MONKS

-ML 4394
.MG 10023

MOZART-VIOLIN CONCERTO NO. 5_
BACH-VIOLIN CONCERTO NO. 2
SCHUMANN-Symphony NO. 2
Munich Philharmonic under Papst
LISZT-HEARD ON THE MOUNTAIN.
Munich Tonkunstler under Strobl

p

.MG 10082

MG 10006

E.

FLUTE RECITAL-JEAN-PIERRE RAMPAL

.MG 10067.

HALF-PRICE SALE
ABOUT 300 78 RPM SINGLE RECORDS
AND A FEW ALBUMS
7/ ie I(u(ic Centee-

Although she has also acted
on television and radio, Miss
Leslie likes neither medium as
well as the stage. "Television and
radio are much too fast for an
actor to really create a part,"
she explained.
Appearing with Miss Leslie in
"Mary Rose" will be two other
members of the original cast, Oli-
ver Thorndyke and Ray Boyle, and
a group of supporting actors in-
cluding Whitford Kane, Philip
Tonge and Pamela Simpson.
Following "Mary Rose" to the
Mendelssohn stage will be "The
Royal Family," a comedy by Ed-
na Ferber and George Kaufman.
The story of a madcap American
theatre family, "The Royal Fam-
ily" will star former University
student Ruth Hussey, and will be
presented June 12 through 16.
Tickets are available for both
shows and can be obtained at the
Lydia Mendelssohn box office.
Daily Classifieds
Get Quick Results

SUMMER

-- we will welcome

you back again

-- and, if you aren't a grad

next fall.

I

SCULPTURED SWIMSUITS
Subtle shirring tops a slim-lined strapless sheath in laton
taffeta to give you high-fashion with all the swim-freedom
of a classic. Optional strap. Wonderful colors of lilac or
persimmon. Sizes 10 to 16. 17.95.
Other swim suits 8.95 to 25.00.
ANN ARBOR MAIN AT LIBERTy
Only the finest quality at prices that are fair.

.1i
.1

'The #(udic Gentex

11

300 South Thayer

Just West of Hill Auditorium

Phone 2-2500

=171

I

46 ^W-

IVZA

A

i

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00rA.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1i833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-"Ancient and Modern Necromancy,
alias Mesmerism and Hypnotism, Denounced."
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
em:- nncii.:- a ,4.. . .a n a rad .

FRIENDS{
11:00 A.M.:

(QUAKER) MEETINGLane Hall
Sundays. Visitors welcome.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with Celebration of Holy
Communion. Sermon by the pastor, "No Trav-
esty of the Gospel !"
Sunday at 4:45: Bible Study.
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta Supper.
Tuesday at 9:15 P.M.: Coffee Hour.
THE VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)

r >
f;
r
'i
i. r
jrW
%:AAA111IY!
:iix
d
r"?i

SALE

Me n's and
Women's

SHOES

This Will Be A Real Sole. We Must Greatly Reduce Our
Before Thousands of Students, Teachers and others leave Ann Arbor for the summer
vacation. New shoes just arrived included in this, our greatest sale in years.

ANNUAL COLLEGE-END

( 7,

FOR MEN

FOR WOMEN

10%-15% to 25% OFF
New styles by Bostonian, Weyenberg,
Plymouth, Pine Tree, Saco-Moc and some
Florsheims.

15%-25% to 50% OFF
Newest styles - Over 1,500 pairs by Flor-
sheim, Foot Rest, Jolene, Dolmode, Lucky
Stride. 1,000 pairs for Dress, Sport or
, . ,

University Community Center Chapel
Willow Run

II

&MVMma'5 *I'

. .1

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan