100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 30, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



'AGE SIX

THE MIfIHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY Sk 1951

....

'AG i IENSDY A ~,15

I

Jobs Keep New Dean Busy

HOME FOR THE SUMMER
SELLINGOU
TO THE BARE FIXTURES
NEVER, BUT NEVER, SUCH BARGAINS

-Daily-Mike Scherer
BOAT BUILDING DEAN-Dean-Elect George G. Brown of the
engineering college planes the keel of a 16 foot boat in the base-
ment workshop of his home.

I

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sec-
ond in a series of articles on the
draft and veteran situation.
By JERRY HELMAN
Selective Service officials have
announced criteria by which col-

JACKETS

Navy Grey or G.I. Khaki .
PANTS
AN$2.99 pair
CORDUROY
PANTS
$3.95
ceiling price $7.95
G.I. Surplus Carmoflouge
PANTS
$1.99 pair
government cost $6.00
Famous Brand
SWIM
TRUNKS
99c
a $3.95 value
Sox
Cushion Soles
(white or black)
6 pair $1.90

values to $20.00
B-15 STYLE
JACKETS
$5.95
values to $14.95
Air Corps Type
SUN
GLASSES
99c
Styles for Men and Women
sox
(DRESS)
6 pair $1.90
35c per pair
ceiling price 75c pr.

> \ f
\ t
BRIEFS
6 for $2.60
49c each . . .
ceiling price 98c each
Undershirts
6 for $2.60
49c each ...
ceiling price 98c each
NAVY
T'S IRTS
6 for $2.99
59c each,.
ceiling price $1.00
TOE
RUBBERS
99c
ceiling price $2.29
Sox
Long Cotton
(white or random)
6 pair $1.25

AT PRICES THAT ARE
IDICULOUSLY LOIV!

lege students will be able to gain
deferment from the draft and also
postpone dates of induction to the
armed forces.
Those eligible for the draft are
single men between the ages of
eighteen and twenty-six who have
never been members of the Armed
Forces. Foreign students who are
in the country as non-quota immi-
grants are exempt.
HOWEVER, FINAL classifica-
tion of students will not occur un-
til the results of their draft tests
have been received by the draft
board and their academic stand-
ing has been determined.
Deferment can be gained by
the student on the basis of the
score received on the college
qualification test and on his
class standing. Either or both
of these are sufficient for defer-
ment, but the final decision in
the case of each student will be
made by that student's draft
board.
THOSE STUDENTS who did
not take the test last Saturday will
be able to do so on June 16 and
30.
Deferments will be given to
prospective seniors who are in the
upper three-fourths of their junior
class, prospective juniors w h o
stand in the upper two-thirds of
their sophomore class and future
sophomores in the upper half of
their freshman class.
Students who have received or-
ders for induction or instructions
to report for induction, will have
them postponed until the results
of the test and a report on the
student's scholastic standing have
been received by his draft board.
However, in no case will a stu-
dent's induction be postponed be-
yond August 20.
If the student fails to meet the
necessary requirements for defer-
ment, he may request a thirty day
postponement of induction, during
which time he may join the armed
service of his choice or get a job
in an essential industry. This rul-
ing also applies to college gradu-
ates.

By MIKE SCHERER
An ex-Brooklynite who doesn't
have time to follow the Dodgers
is Prof. George 'Granger Brown,
dean-elect of the University's Col-
lege of Engineering.
Prof. Brown, an avid baseball
fan in his prep school days, finds
that with his present duties he
just doesn't have time to keep up
with his old hobbies. He will take
over the office held by Dean Ivan
D. Crawford July 1.
* * *
RESEARCH PROJECTS and
teaching classes have limited the
professor to a routine which in-
cludes more than 60 working
hours a week, besides numerous
speaking engagements.
Although the newly appointed
Dean confesses that he has had
little time recently for leisure
and vacationing, he does take
advantage of opportunities to
sail on Lake Michigan. During
1949, Prof. Brown's last real
vacation, he was a crew mem-
ber in the annual Macmnac is-
land race. He admits candidly
that they didn't place too well.
Even at the age of 54 the engi-
neer and scientist looks like the
athlete he was in college. He
stands six feet, one inch tall and
weighs 212 pounds. "I Just man-
age to stay near the boiling point,
he says.
* * *
AT NEW YORK University
Prof. Brown played varsity foot-
ball and ran on the track team.
In his first years as a professor
at the University, he built a ten-
nis court at his home and played
frequently.
Shortly before the outbreak of
World War I the professor was
married to Dorothy B. Martin.
They now have a family of three
engineers: George, 32 years old,
a professor of chemical enlgi-
neering at Northwestern Uni-
versity; Judson, 30 years old,
now a professional engineer;
and David, 24 years old, who is
also an engineer. All three sons
attended the University.
An engineer for more than 20
years himself, Prof. Brown has
made numerous contributions to
science through his research work.
His special field has been in pe-
troleum products. During crucial
war years he devised a much-
needed process for tripling the
output of certain Canadian oil
fields. This method became known
as the Brown plan for petroleum
conservation.
ONE OF THE highlights of his
career, according to the professor,
was being elected to the presiden-
cy of the American Institute of
Chemical Engineers in 1945. In
1949 he was named Director of
the U.S. Atomic Energy Commis-
sion's Division of Engineering.
Prof. Brown is a public speak-
er of unusual merit, particularly
when debating. He strongly
supports the debate as a demo-
cratic means of solving prob-
lems, and deplores the modern
"expert" whose word alone can
solve an argument.
Much of the Professor's oratory
has been done in the courtroom
where he has appeared in many
lawsuits as a technical advisor
and witness. One of his pet peeves
is the crafty lawyer who tries to
trick him into a false answer by
demanding a one word response.
"I believe in explaining my ideas
fully in such situations," he ex-
plained.

},
i

jI

I..

A

-

FOLLOW THE CROWDS BEFORE THE STOCKS
"FADE AWAY LIKE AN OLD SOLDIER"

A
4

TRENCH COATS

GONE

$388
$12.95 ceiling price
$19.75 ceiling price
Get Yours

$1488
$39.50 ceiling price
NOT ALL SIZES
IN ALL STYLES
MUST SACRIFICE
TO
CLEAR TO LAST
GARMENT

/

EVERYTHING must be GONE
by June 15th
HURRY!
* HURRY!
HURRY!

Today!

AND 1001 OTHER SURPLUS BARGAINS

25c Can Lighter
Fluid ...........10c

2.50 Ski Goggles . .. .29c
1.29 Flashlights ....59c
G. 1. Insect
Repellent ... . . ..1Oc

50c Toothbrushes ...19c
1.50 Leather
Wallets . .........39c
75c Ear Plugs ......10c

Paint ......1.99

3 in 1 Oil . .......
Cloth Watch bands

.1Oc
..5c

To Get Your Summer
Supplies At This Event
at
"THE BIGGEST LITTLE
CTARh IN THE WORLD"

GAS MASK and CANVAS CASE 10c

III III

III

--

Ill

.I I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan