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May 29, 1951 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1951-05-29

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REGRESSION
See Page 4'

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Latest Deadline in the .State

VOL. LXI, No. 168 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 29, 1951

CLOUDY AND WARMER
SIX PAGES

Joint
Legislation
Sets Draft
Age at 18%
Plans, for UMT
Included in Bill
WASHINGTON-()-A Sen-
ate-House Conference Committee
reached agreement on a new drafi
bill yesterday and laid the founda-
tion for Universal Military Train-
ing in the United States.
The compromise legislation
would drop the minimum draft age
from 19 years to 18'/2 and keep the
Selective Service system going un-
til July 1, 1955.
IT WOULD also set up the
framework for Urniversal Military
Training, with the proviso that
Congress shall take a second, long
look at the idea before putting any
program into effect.
Before the deadlock on the
Senate-House bills can be broken
completely, however, the com-
promise measure must be ap-
proved by both chambers.
Senator Russell (D-Ga.), chair-
man of the Senate Armed Services
Committee, and Rep. Vinson (D-
Ga.), head of a similar committee
in the House, expressed confidence
that the machinery for Universal
Military Training would be in ef-
J fect by the end of this year.
The actual training program is
not expected to start until the end
of the Korean emergency.
RUSSELL called the agreement
on UMT "rather historic business."
He said many authorities believe
that if the United States had had a
Universal Military Training pro-
gram 40 years ago it might have
prevented Wolrd Wars I and II.
Both he and Vinson said they
were sure the Senate and House
would approve the compromise.
The conference report probably
will be acted on in the Senate
Thursday or Friday. Vinson
plans to call it up in the House
next week.
The present draft law expires
July 9. Dropping the draft age
from 19 to 18%/2 makes about 500,-
000 more youths eligible for mili-
tary service, but the conferees pre-
dicted that few younger than 19
would be inducted for a long time,
if ever. The bill provides that all
those available in the 19 to 26-year
group must be called first.
A* * *
Army To Call
only 15,000
In JulyDraft
WASHINGTON-O?)-The Army
issued a draft call yesterday for
15,000 men in July.
This is the smallest number re-
quested for any one month since
the new Selective Service program
began.
The Army drafted 80,000 men
in January and the same number
in February and March. It drew
40,000 a month in April and May,
fixed a total of 20,000 for June
and 22,000 for August of this
year.
Reduced casualties in Korea and

increasing volunteer enlistments,
the Army said, are the main fac-

Committee

Agrees

on

DI(Ift

Compromise

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CONCERT AIDS BLIND GIRL-Stanley Baxter, governor of the
Loyal Order of the Moose, presents a rose to blind 8-year-old
Flora Jean Pittman at a benefit concert last night. The concert,
given by the Lyra Male Chorus and sponsored by the Loyal
Order of the Moose, was given to provide funds for a trip to New
York where Flora Jean will see an eye specialist.
Vets Face St-udy Choice
Deadline Under GI Bill
By JERRY HIELMANing his curriculum, he will be
With the approach of the end allowed to do so even after the
of the academic year, veterans in 'cut-off' date. Some reasons
school under the GI Bill will have considered satisfactory by the
to choose a definite course of study Veteran's Administration are:
or lose the Bill' benefits. 1. Failure to make good progress
According to the provisions of in his present course when that
the GI Bill, a veteran's course of failure is not due to misconduct,
education must be initiated on or neglect or lack of application.
before July 25, four years after 2. If the course the student de-
the date decided upon by Congress sires to change to is more in
as the termination of World keeping with his aptitude, previous
War II. education and training.

(andenberg
;ays Peace U
an Be Kept
Urges Air ForceA b
Be HeldIntace
WASHINGTON - (IP) - Gen.
oyt Vandenberg told Senators
sterday there's a good chance
e United States can avoid an-
her world war and also win a
gotiated peace in Korea without"
mbing Red bases in Manchuria.
But the Air Force Chief of Staff
mpered this optimism by saying
e U.S. now has only a "shoe-
ring air force" which cannot be
rown into Korea in force while'
ere is danger elsewhere of at-
ck from Russia.
HE URGED that the Air Force
kept intact and not used in a
oader war against China as pro-
sed by Gen. Douglas MacArthur.
Vandenberg gave thti testi-
pony to the Senate Armed Ser-
ices and Foreign Relations com- -;
nittees in their study of the rea-
ons behind the ouster of Mac-
rthur from his Far East Coi-
nands.
He said he agreed with the other
int Chiefs of Staff that Mac-
thur had to be dismissed for his
position to Administration war
dicy.
A SHORT TIME before, Rus-
's Jacob A. Malik said through a MOVIE MISHAP - Ge
okesman at New York that talk the University Band, lies
Russian peace feelers at this the heavy camera which
ge of the Korean war were
ompletely groundless."
The chief Soviet delegate to court VO
hie United Nations let it be C u tG v
nown that his, denial was to
pply "fully" to all reports that
he Soviet want to discuss an end
o the war along the 38th paral-
4 in Korer. T o o
Vandenberg argued the Air1
rce must be kept in readiness
meet any attack that might be
inched by the Russians. WASHINGTON-) -- T
preme Court yesterday uphi
hoeniX G its color television plans of
oenix Gifts lumbia Broadcasting Syster
ening the door to a new+
rom Industry public entertainment.
However, 1 e g a I techni
op $200,000 alone could delay an actua
on color telecasting for 25
and it may be a considerab
More than $200,000 in gifts from before many American
corporations have been re- have color television.
ved by the Phoenix Project dur- In New York, CBS sai
the past weeks, according to "within a few months it e
orge Mason, PhoeniX special gift to be producing a subs
airman. schedule of color programs.
The largest gift, $100,000 came terials shortages may prove
m the Dearborn Motors Cor- damper on the new effort.
ation. Another, for $50,000 TV sets already in use wi
me from the Eli Lilly and Com- to be adapted before they c
ny for medical research. ceive CBS color telecasting,
Other gifts come from the Mon- in color or in black or whi
Auto Equipment Company, The Supreme Court, by
,680; Burroughs Adding Ma- vote, rejected a plea by the
ne Co., $10,000; Detroit Gasket CorprjtedoApericy t
, $,00; arkr ustProf o.Corporation of America
.$5,000; Parker Rust Proof Co., aside the approval given tb,
000; The Detroit Bank, $10,000; system by the Federal Coi
d L. A. Young Spring and Wire cations Commission. RCA
., $10,000. itonscommisste,CA
Two other concerns that have it own competing system,
ently presented gifts have re-pdlwnteFCw m e
sted that their gifts not be public interest.
blicized.-
More than half of the money 'Birth of a Nat
the Phoenix Project to date
come from corporation and The Neptune Film Society
ndations," Mason said. pus sponsor of "Birth of
While most of these gifts are tion," is still attempting to
estricted," he added, "some are hall for a local showingc
marked for such projects as film, Allan Silver, '51, group
ustrial health, protective coat- ber, said yesterday.
s for metals, preservation of "We still have a copyc

ds through bombardment with film," Silver said, "but if w
mic particles, cancer research find a place to show it by I
d conservation of natural re- day, we'll have to return th

*

*

*

*

iese Retreat Ends

ye

38 th

Parallel

-Courtesy Unive'sity News Service
orge Leontough, victim of a freak accident yesterday during the filming of
on the spot where he fell awaiting the ambulance. In the background is
fell directly beside him.
Cameraman Hurt While
4-t Filming 'U' BandMoi

*

k

Those enrolled under the Vo-
cational Rehabilitation Act for
disabled veterans will not be af-
fected by this ruling.
NO COURSE change can be
made after this date, and anyl
veteran who has left school and'
intends to return for the fall se-
mester will not be allowed to ap-
ply for GI Bill benefits. However,
they may enroll in summer school.
Veterans will be required to pur-
sue the same course of study next
fall unless the course is changed
before July 25. Applications for
a change of course will not be
considered valid after the July 251
'cut-off' date, and once a course
is completed after this date, a
new course may not be started.
However, if the veteran has a
satisfactory reason for chang-
tors in the declining draft figures.
Under the present program, at
the end of August, 377,000 men will
have been drafted into the Army
this year. The Navy, Marine Corps
and Air Force have not called on
Selective Service for draftees in
1951.
The Navy-the only service still
calling enlisted reservists indivi-
dually-said yesterday it will or-
der up 3,000 non-rated reservists
a month starting in August.

E
I
I

3. If the course the veteran de-I laU
sires to change to is a normal pro-
gression from his current course,
and will help him attain his edu- P
cational or vocational objective.
OTHER CASES in which the' F

'cut-off' date does not apply are
those in which the veteran re-
turns to active service or is now
in the Armed Forces. If the vet-
eran reenlists, however, he will
be expected to resume his studies
within a reasonable time after his
release from active duty.
In instances where veterans are
waiting for acceptance to medical,
dental and osteopathic schools, the
July date will not be enforced.
They will receive full GI Bill bene-
fits as soon as they are accepted
by an accredited school. Those
who are studying to be teachers
and take GI Bill courses during
the summer will also be exempt
from the 'cut-off' ruling.
Irate.Spurns
World Court
In Secret Plan
TEHRAN, Iran-(/P)-Iran yes-.
terday spurned the World Court
and made ready a secret plan for
taking over Anglo-Iranian Oil Co.,
fields and the Abandan Refinery
from the British.
The oil company applied to the
International Court of Justice at
The Hague Saturday for appoint-
ment of an arbitrator under its
60-year contract with the Iran
government.
W
BUT YESTERDAY Deputy
Prime Minister Hosseni Fatemi
declared Iran would ignore any
proceedings before t h e World
Court and would send no represen-
tatives to plead her case. ry
Foreign Minister Bagher Ka-
zami sent a message to The
Hague saying: "I hereby de-
clare the Iranian Government is
of the opinion that the Interna-
tional Court of Justice is not
competent to handle this matter
and when the full text of the
orlaint reaheK us we shall

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VI The filming of the University
Band by a Hollywood studio yes-
terday afternoon was interrupted
he Su- suddenly by a freak accident when
a Detroit .cameraman fell from a
eld the scaffold and badly injured his
ge Co back.
ea ini The accident occurred when a
scaffolding where the camera was
being operated gave way, plunging
calities the operators to the ground.
1 startl
days, GEORGE LEONTOUGH, 55
le time years old, and Larry O'Reilly, di-
homes rector of the film, were standing
on the scaffolding with a huge
d that
expects
tantial National
Ma-
ea big
'aig Roundup
ll havej
an re- By The Associated Press
either ROME - Slowly mounting re-
te turns from Italy's municipal elec-
tions last night gave Premier
an 8-1 Alcide De Gasperi's coalition the
Radio lead over Communists even in
to set some sections of the northern Red
.e CBS belt.
nmuni- *
argued DETROIT - A court's refusal
turned' yesterday to intervene immedi-
in the ately in the 38-day Detroit tran-
sit strike apparently doomed the

I

I

camera between them while tech-
nicians picked up the weakly built
structure to carry it to the other
side of the walk.
At this point the scaffolding
gave way, and both men and the
camera fell back on the ground.
Although O'Reilly remained un-
hurt, Leontough fell directly on
the pavement, injuring his back.
An ambulance was called, and
he was rushed to a nearby hospi-
tal for X-ray and observation.
The big camera fell to the ground
immediately beside Leontough. It
needed only minor repairs, and
was soon put back into working
condition, with no film injured.
WITH THE traditional "the
show must go on" spirit, camera-
men continued their filming of the
band which will be featured in
the "This Is America" series next
fall.
Although Leontough's injuries
were reported slight, hospital of-
ficials say he will remain there for
future observation.
'Ensian Sale
A few copies of the 1951 Rose
Bowl Michiganensian are still
available to students who
haven't yet purchased theirs,
Peg Blackford, '52Ed, distribu-
tion manager, announced yester-
day.
They may be purchased for $6
today, Thursday or Friday on
the second floor of the student
publications building.
Students who have already
paid, but not yet picked up their
year books may obtain them
from 3 to 5:30 p.m. today, Thurs-
day or Friday.

Costly Stand
Averts Total
Red Defeat.
Allies Wipe Out
Two Divisions
TOKYO - (P) - Red Chinese
troops ended their headlong re-
treat today and even counter-
attacked at some points north of
the 38th parallel after a bloody
four-day allied offensive.
Allied troops trapped and de-
stroyed two Chinese Red divisions
in central Korea in the recent
fighting, the Eighth Army reported
today.
BUT IT IS BELIEVED the costly
Red stand-12,974 killed or wound-
ed, 5,028 captured-in the center
may have allowed the bulk of the
Communists to slip back north of
the 38th parallel.
The two Red divisions were en-
circled and eliminated as a fight-
ing force northwest of Chunchon
45 miles northeast of Seoul,
from Friday night through yes-
terday.
"The enemy pocket in this area
has been cleaned up except for a
few scattered Communist groups,"
an Eighth Army officer said.
A PRISONER haul of 2,558 was
madehyesterday by Allied forces
who have driven the Reds from
virtually all territory gained in the
Reds' two turned-back spring of-
fensives.
Red resistance stiffened yes-
terday and today on the east-
central front around Ine and
Hyon and on the central front
near Hwachon. The Communists
showed signs of standing still
and trying to halt the general al-
lied push across the 38th parallel
into North Korea.
An Eighth Army staff officer
said costly Red delaying actions
probably have permitted many
troops to elude United Nations
traps.
The Allies were hampered by
mud. The Reds were able to slip
up roads and trails before the
sloshing Allies could cut them,
PURSUING UN forces were driv-
ing four to 14 miles inside North
Korea across the 125-mile mide
peninsula. The Allied positions
were about the same they occupied
just before the first Red hammer
blow the night of April 22.
In one week the Eighth Army of-
fensive has eliminated Red pene-
trations ranging up to 25 miles
below the 38th parallel. The total
Red gains were from 30 to 40 miles.
However, field dispatches said
3,000 Chinese were in action last
night against U.S. troops on the
central front, west of Hwachon
reservoir. That was roughly seven
miles north of the old political
boundary.
West Germans Set
Up Border Patrol
BONN - (A) - West Germans
armed with pistols, rifles and ma-
chine guns now face, the Soviet-
backed "People's Police" across the
Iron Curtain.
Federal Interior Minister Robert
Lehr yesterday announced that
first units of a new 10,000 strong
border protection police force now
are in position on the Soviet fron

tier in Bavaria.
They will soon be joined by
others on the east-west frontier

TO SHUN MANSION?
New President May Not
Reside in Ruthven Home

Hlt't
, cam-
a Na-
rent a
of the
mem-
of the
e can't
Thurs-
ze film

city to at least three more days
without public transportation.
"'"* *'" '"*****.
ATLANTIC CITY - Warren R.
Austin, chief U. S. delegate to the
United Nations, said last night the
United States would disclose soon
how many troops it would earmark
for use by the UN in future
emergencies.
DETROIT - More than 38,000
Chrysler Corp. Workers were idled
yesterday as the result of a
Smocks vs. Overalls dispute.

rces."

to the distributor."

By JOYCE FICKIES
Incoming University' President
Harlan H. Hatcher may not live
in the home that President Ruth-
ven has occupied for the last
twenty-two years, but in an off-
campus house instead, according
to unconfirmed reports.
- Administrative officials refused
to comment on the rumors.
* * *
CENTER of speculation is the
Inglis home, 2301 Highland Road,
A which is located north of Geddes

been pointed out that the Univer-
sity is getting too big for this to
always be possible.
Also, the huge size of the man-
sion is thought to be a disadvan-
tage for Hatcher and his small
family.
THE PRESIDENT'S home, if
Hatcher were to live there, would
need to be completely redecorated,
according to W. M. Roth, Plant
Department superintendent. Since
the Ruthvens have until September
+n mnvptTA +bp mld hplit+tl

THIRD DRAMA SEASON OFFERING:
SEl iot's 'Cocktail Party'

To Open Tonight

l 7

T. S. Eliot's "The Cocktail Par-
ty," one of the foremost contro-
versial plays of the times, will
open at 8:30 p.m. today in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre as the third
offering of the Ann Arbor Drama

- Daniell, a veteran of more than
thirty years on the stage, first ap-
peared in New York, in company
with Ethel and John Barrymore
and has since been noted for his
appearances on the screen, radio
ai +c'telvisinn a s wll asin +he

Drama Season. Philip Tonge has
been seen in the two preceding
Season productions, "Captain
Brassbound's Conversion" and
"Ring-Round-the-Moon." Neva
Patterson and Pamela Simpson
n1ved in the 1949 and 19 50nrama.

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