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May 26, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY t$, 1951

A1

CTOR ASSERTS: 'U' TV Hour
'Star's Privacy ShouldlBe Respected' Wins Award
* * * *
actors' private lives should not....: The.....W.....V..Univer....ity:.:.e..e-
nvestigated by thHeu sbi Hn-t visin r won Variety Maga-
Daniell, star of "The Cocktail Award for education
ty' which will open here Tues- ~by television, it was announced
asserted. ystrdy
yesterday.
The theatre is a matter of ii- The awards are made annually
on, and it is a misfortune that by the entertainment trade news-
pe destroy it by prying into paper for outstanding programs
affairs of stage people," the .:and promotions in radio and tele-
inguished English born actor, vision.
ran of more than 30 years in In making the award, the news-
theatre, said at an interview. paper stated that "The WWJ-TV
The important thing to an au- ..University of Michigan project is
ice should be the life the ac- ..,..more than a guidepost and stimu-
portrays on the stage, his per- lant for other TV stations to step
..l habits have nothing to do .,up their own educational program-
i his professional progress " m ning, it is a heartening portent of
* * * ..\ _things to come in video."
ANIELL PLAYS the lead in
S. Eliot's provocative drama,
or as the third Drama Season '
ring of this year's series.
The "Cocktail Party" role
niell finds to be "a great or- "The Blue Angel," a German
I 1of concentration." "The film classic starring Marlene Die-
ty is really an exposition of ftrich and Emil Jannings, will be
idea," he explained, "pre- presented again at 7:30 and 9:30
ited in a compact, tense man- pre.etdainHaudi30rnum.3
x' .... - 'p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
r}Termed a study in degradation,
aniell, who has played innum- the movie swept the continent in
ble roles in the movies, on ra- the early thirties and had later
and on television as well as on successes in this country. The
stage, does not think the tem- film, which is being presented by
of the audiences has changed REHEARSAL-Madeleine Clive, Edward Ashley and star, Henry SL Cinema Guild, meant Holly-
ch since he first started his Daniell (right) work on a scene from the forthcoming "Cocktail wood success for both Miss Die-
eer. "But the acting profession Party," T. S. Eliot's drama which will begin a seven performance trich and the director, Josef von
if has changed some," he re- run at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre Tuesday. Sternberg.

Se ool

of ILrsmIg ramns 2 0
Student Nurses Eat, Seep
And Study in Cousins all

;;

The University's School of Nursing, which moved to its Cousins
Hall location in 1925, is currently training 205 students in its three
year program. A
Located across and down the street from the Hospital, Cousins
Hall is an integral part of the University's giant medical center.
Besides the nurses school, this includes the 1,029 bed Hospital, the
Simpson Memorial Institute for Medical Research, the Neuropsychi-
atric Institute, the Veterans Readjustment Center, the Maternity
Unit, the School of Public Health and, indirectly, the Medical School
and the Dental School.
* * * *

STUDENT NURSES can
different programs. One is
* * *

SENIOR INSTRUCTS NEW MOTHER AT MATERNITY
HOSPITAL

enter the training period under two
the regular three year plan which
*qualifies- the student for a pro-
I fessional diploma in nursing.
A second program lasts five
years, with the prospective nurse
first taking two year's work in
the literary college before enter-
ing the three year nursing
schedule. This second course
wins the student the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Nursing,
Students spend the first half of
the three year program in class-
rooms, laboratories, and in the
practice ward. Many of the class-
rooms, including a fifty-bed prac-
tice unit, are located in Cousins
Hall itself, which also serves as
the students' dormitory.
IN THE practice ward, the stu-
dents work with life-size dolls
called "Sally Chase's" as well as
each other to perfect the nursing
arts and techniques.
During the second half of the
three year training program,
nursing students get supervised
clinical experience at the hos-
pital, doing actual patient care
work.
Most student nurses work full
eight hour days during their train-
ing period, a schedule which dif-
fers vastly from the ordinary co-
eds'. The Cousins Hall lounges,
game rooms, its small gymnasium
and library, however, help lighten
the heavy study load.
Upon graduation the full fledged
nurse can seek employment at a
hospital or continue her studies

Draftees Get Overseas Notice
After Eleven Weeks Training

The group of draftees I was
with had just passed Saturday
morning inspection when we were
told that NO one would leave the
barracks u n d e r ANY circum-
stances. By the time "It" came a
few hours later, we suspected what
it was. Our company commander
said that some of us had been
alerted for overseas shipment to
FECOM (Far East Command) as
replacements.
THE COMPANY thought as one
man "This is it," and when my
name was called, I knew that this
WAS it.
I found that I was an alter-
nate, second in line to be taken,
and would not have to go unless
two men alerted were found un-
fit to go. There were two such
men, so I, along with the men
in my company and several hun-
dred men in the division, could
look forward to a long bivouao
in Korea eventually.
From that fateful Saturday to
the following Wednesday we hur-
ried around the post getting more
and more shots and preparing to
. get out of camp, but most of the
time we sat on our thumbs waiting
for the red tape of our papers to
be untangled.
WE WONDERED and asked how
we could possibly be fit for combat
or even overseas shipment when
we had received such little train-
ing. Most of us had hardly hand-
led an M-1 rifle except when fir-
ing it, and had ridiculously little
know-how on the use of the bay-
onet.
M Besides, we were told that no
one would be sent overseas with-
out a minimum of 14 weeks of
basic training. Officials appar-
ently forgot or ignored this and
worried only about getting us on
our way.
Along with the shots and the
usual paper work, we had two
more assignments in the field,
which made up our "battle indoc-
trination." They were the infil-
tration course, in which you crawl
on your belly with live bullets sing-
ing over your head; and a short
bombardment course in which you
sit patiently while 105-mm. howit-
zer shells go over your head and
burst 300 to 500 yards in front of
you.
* * *

GRADUATION

A

STUDENT PRACTICES ON LIFE SIZED DOLL

Hill at Tappan Street
Rev. Joseph M. Smith Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
9:30 A.M.: Church School-College Age Class.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (nursery for chil-
dren). Sermon: "You Can't Go Home Again."
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynord Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Jeon Garee Brodlev, Associate
STUDENT GUILD: 7:00 meeting at the Guild
House. Prof. Ralph Spielman of the sociology
department will talk on "The Conflict of Sacred
and Secular Reason." installation of new of-
ficers.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin."
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large and
Erland J. Wangdahl, Ministers
Mrs. R. L. Blough, Student Director
10:45 A.M.: Worship. "The Long View," Mr.
Large preaching.
2:30 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild annual picnic. Meet
at the church to go to the William Campbell
home.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms - Open
Daily.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-"Soul and Body."
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
Ths room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Fridays 7-9
P. M., Saturday 3-5 P.M.

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
STUDENT CENTER
(National Lutheran Council)
1304 Hill Street
Dr. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Services in Zion & Trinity Churches.
4:30 P.M.: LSA Outdoor Meeting-Meet at the
ZionLutheran Parish Hall.
Wednesday-
4:00 P.M.: Tea and Coffee Hour at the Center.
Thursday-
7;25-7:50 A.M.: Devotions at the Center.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Worship Service. Sermon by the
Rev. R. W. Hahn of Chicago, Exec. Secy. of the
Student Service Commission of The Lutheran
Church-Missouri Synod.
Sunday at 6:00: Fellowship and Recognition Din-
ner of Chapel Assembly and Gamma Delta.
Guest speaker, Mr. Walter F. Patenge of Lan-
sing.
THE VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center Chapel
Willow Run
Reverend Blaise Levai, Pastor

STUDENT NURSES AID YOUNGSTER AT COUSINS HAIL
OPEN HOUSE

)t

x..

Sunday, May 27th, 1951
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Sermon --
Lawful."
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
4:30 P.M.: Study and 'Discussion Group.

"Is It

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M.: Unitarian Church School.
Adult Group-Dr. Alvin Zander, Chairman.
11 A.M.: Service of Worship-Rev. Edward H.
Redman preaching on "Ivory Towers and Bomb
Shelters."
3:00 P.M.: Unitarian High School Group.

AFTER THESE assignments we
had only one thing to do-make
sure we had insurance policies of
some kind, preferably for $10,000
or more. That, of course, made us
feel safe to go to Korea.
For several days before leav-
ing, we were restricted to the
post, so all we did for recreation
was see movies, drink beer and
write letters.
But all our troubles temporarily
disappeared when we learned that
we would get a nine to 20 day de-
lay enroute to our new destination.
To put our spirits up another
notch, we were given travel pay
and up to three months advance
pay.
We bid a not-very-sad farewell
to Camp Polk, knowing little about
the future, except that we, were
to report to Camp Stoneman,
Calif., an overseas processing cen-
ter in the hills near San Francisco.
(To be continued)

FROM OXFORDS TO PUMPS FOR A WEEKEND DATE

A
DAILY
PHOTO
FEATU RE

SENOR. CHECKS PATIENT'S TEMPERATURE AND PULSE

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

II

i

s, . .

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