100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

?InURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951

..............

VORLD PREMIERE-Prof. Ross Lee Finney (left) watches as Prof. Wayne Dunlap conducts the
University Symphony Orchestra in a rehearsal for the world premiere of Prof. Finney's "Concerto
or Violin and Orchestra." Prof. Gilbert Ross, featured soloist, is. on the right. The concert will be
ield tonight at Hill Auditorium.
* * * * * * * * * -

Finney's Concerto To Be Given Today

Professor
Cites World
UnityNeed
"We are facing a situation of1
one world or none," Prof. Ken-
neth E. Boulding of the econom-
ics department gloomily predicted
to the UNESCO Council last night.
Boulding was referring to a,
fourth world war. He stated that
the world might be able to stand
a third world war, but certainly+
not a fourth.,
* * *
'IT IS TOO LATE to prevent a
third global conflict," he said, but
he added with some trace of op-
timism, "if there is not a war this
year there might not be one for
twenty years."
The cause of war, Boulding
pointed out, is a highly secial-
ized kind of conflict peculiarly
characteristic of nation states
that have a strong "we" feeling.
As to whether economic con-
flicts are important causes of
war, Boulding stressed an em-
phatic "no." Although, he ad-
mitted, there have been times in
the past when war was simply
an -economic investment, eco-
nomic conflict is not, in the
twentieth century, .a cause 'of
war.
"I can't think of any economic
conflicts between the United States
and Russia," Boulding asserted.
The professor further termed
the state of the world as being
similar to a neurotic personality,
and declared that one of the most
unfortunate situations existing is
the tendency to associate the term,
"negotiation" with the word "ap-
peasement."
Crane To Talk
At Initiation
Prof. H. O. Crane of the physics
department will speak on "Dating
the Past with Radioactive Mater-
ials" at the annual initiation cere-
monies of Phi Kappa Phi, national
honorary scholastic society, at 8
p.m. today in Rackham lecture
hall.
Six faculty members and 299
students will be initiated into the
group at the meeting which will
be followed by an informal recep-
tion in Rackham assembly hall.
IT'S COLLEGIATE
STYLES
by Courteous
Skilled
Personnel
9 Barbers-No Waiting
The Bascola Barbers
Liberty, near State

"If lasting peace is to be at-
tained, every citizen must under-
stand the importance of preserving
freedom of speech and inquiry,"
Prof. Walter H. Laves of the poli-
tical science department declared
in an address yesterday to the
Adult Education Institute.
Laves emphasized that each citi-
zen must know how to influence
political decisions by makiIg his
opinions on governmental policy
count. .
LAVES, former deputy general

director of UNESCO, spoke of the
American neglect of foreign
languages and interests as one of
the factors creating animosity
toward the United States in for-
eign nations. "Americans expect
everybody else to learn English-
and this is not taken lightly by the
people of other countries."
Prof. Stanley A. Cain, of the
Natural Resources School, told
the clubwomen attending the
second sesison of the three-day
Institute that Communism has
gained the "inside track" in
many parts of the world by

promising to poorer countries
the things they want.
"Democratic aid measures, al-
though backed up by the more
.solid American reputation, are
weakened greatly by their slow-
ness," the professor continued.
* * * -
IN CONCLUSION he warned
that "we cannot exist as the only
prosperous nation in the world,
nor can we indefinitely subsidize
our trade with other countries."
Also on yesterday's Adult Edu-
cation program were Extension

Service Director E. J. Soop and
Clare E. Griffin of the business
administration school.
Today, during its final sesion,
the Institute will hear ProAE.
Lowell Kelly of the psychology de-
partment, on "Changing Attitudes
Towards the Problems of Mental
Health," and Prof. Robert E. Ward
of the political science department
who wil speak on "MacArthur's
Japan and After."
Prof. J. Philip Wernette of the
business administration school will
speak on "What Is Our Economic
Future?"' at the final session.

If

i

Free Speech a Must to Peace-Laves

.

i
IS
it

'!"

m

PHOTOSTAKEN

LIKE THOUSANDS OF AMERICA'S STUDENTS-
MAKE THIS MILDNESS TEST YOURSELF AND GET
WHAT EVERY SMOKER WANTS.

.c

i

4

;,

I

A

NO UNPLEASANT AFTER-TASTE
OVER 1500 PROMINENT TOBACCO GROWERS
SAY: "When I apply the Standard Tobacco Growers'
Test to cigarettes I find Chesterfield is the one that
smells Milder and smokes Milder."

II

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan