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May 23, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-23

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E SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDJNESDIAY, MAY 23. 195:

Snake Puts Bite on Dancer

Muehl Says
India Needs
Broader Aid
India needs a broader program
of American aid aimed at solving
her real problems rather than just
"dropping money into the first
hand that stretches out," John F.
Muehl of the English department
said last night.
Speaking before the Political
Science Roundtable, the author of
"Interview With India" declared
that aid to India must go beyond
Point Four and must somehow get
down to the village level where
the real problem and danger lies.
* * *
MUEHL POINTED out that the
present government in India is not
getting enough of our aid down
to the villages where tremendous
poverty and imminent revolt hov-
er. "The majortiy Congress Party
is doing almost nothing to meet
this problem but merely stands
terrified at the danger that is
there," he added.
Having traveled through In-
dia -as a free lance writer, Muehl
noted that there is inadequate
news coverage in India.
"Because the American people
have so little information on In-
dia," he said, "we tend to think
of the country as a stronghold of
democracy in' Asia when actually
it is not. Consequently we are not
critically aware of the real prob-
lem because we accept whatever
is said at face value."
Muehl did not think that pov-
erty is inevitable in India because
of the great resource potential
that exists there. He also felt that
the United States should do every-
thing possible to encourage social
change in India.
"The trouble with our foreign
policy is that we are ready to
support any regime in India just
so it is a native one," Muehl said.
He added that we were not cri-
tical enough of existing regime but
seemed to accept it as it was des-
pite the fact that it was not com-
ing half way to meet India's prob-
lem of poverty.
Orchestra Will

New'U' President at Home

-AP News Photo
NEW 'U' PRESIDENT AND FAMILY-Harlan H. Hatcher is shown with Mrs. Hatcher and their two
children, Anne Linda, 5 years old, and Bobby, 7 years old, at their Columbus home. Hatcher has been
vice-president of Ohio State University since 1948. He will take office as University president Sep-
tember 1.

Congress Not Debating Basic
Foreign Policy, Knappen Says

-Daily-Roger Reinke
WOUNDED CHARMER AND FRIEND
Benefit Concert To Be Given
By Chorus To Help Blind Child

17
I
0
d
b
e
a
t
c
t
t
f

formance at Pattengill Auditor-
ium.
The child, Flora Jean Pittman,
was born blind. Deserted by her
parents when she was very small,
she was taken in by a family in
Belding, Michigan. However, her
foster parents were too poor to
send her to New York for the op-
erations she needed to regain her
sight.
Friends sent contributions, how-
ever, that have sent her twice to
New York.
* * *

Speaking yesterday at the open-
ing session of the Adult Education
Institute, Prof. Marshall Knappen,
of the political science department,
declared that Congress is not de-
bating our basic foreign policy,
but only the details of carrying it
out.
That policy, upon which both
e Administration and General
acArthur agree, is containment
of Communism, he said.
Knappen characterized the
Communists as taking advantage
of opportunities- to expand, as
those opportunities arise, believing
that the time factor will be in their
favor.
In conclusion, Knappen urged
Americans to be "as cool and cal-
culating as the Russians are."
Clubwomen attended the Insti-
tute from throughout Michigan.
The address was followed by a

greeting to the group from Presi-
dent Ruthven. Dean Georgel
Brown, of the engineering college,
also spoke.
Bridge Tourney
To Start Today
Bridge addicts will have a
chance to exhibit their card-play-
ing prowess at an all-campus
bridge tournament to be held at
7:30 p.m. today, in the Union
Ballroom.
University women are invited
this year, for the first time, to
participate in the event. I
The tournament will determine
the University's delegates to the
annual State of Michigan Bridge
Tourney, which will be held June
3, in Detroit.

IN 1947, after the first operation
by a prominent eye surgeon, she
regained 70 per cent of her vision.
The second operation, however,
proved unsuccessful inj one eye,
and so a third trip is being
planned.
To help sponsor this trip the
Ann Arbor Loyal Order of the
Moose is sponsoring the concert
Monday night. Rose Marie Jun,
Grad., will be the featured solo-
ist.
Since her last operation Flora
Jean has learned to play the piano,
and although she is only eight
years old, she has the IQ of a
12-year-old.
Flora Jean will arrive in Ann
Arbor Saturday, and will remain
here until after the concert Mon-
day night. At present she is stay-
ing in Ypsilanti with herwfoster-
mother's daughter. She will fly
from here to New York in June.
Journalists To
Receive Awards
The fourth annual Honors Con-
vocation of the Department of
Journalism will be held at 3:00
p.m. today in Rm. 1025 Angell
Hall with V. V. McNitt presenting
the awards.
McNitt, head of the McNaught
Syndicate of New York and donor
of the major awards, the Mc-
Naught Medals of Honor, will re-
flect on more than fifty years of
experience in journalism in his
lecture, "Prospects and Retrospect
of Newspapering."
ti

Play Thursday
The world premiere of "Concer-r
to for Violin and Orchestra," a
new work by Prof. Ross Lee Fin-
ney of the music school, will be
presented by the University Sym-
phony Orchestra at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Hill Auditorium.
This is the first concerto Prof.
Finney has written. It took 15
years to complete. The University
Symphony Orchestra has pre-
sented three othe rworld pre-
mieres of his works in the past.
Soloist for the concert will be
Prof. Gilbert Ross of^the music
school. Wayne Dunlap will con-
duct the orchestra.
In addition' to Finney's concer-
to, the orchestra will play two
works by Brahms and Samuel
Barber's overture to "The School
for Scandal."
The concert is open to the pub-
lic free of charge.

U

W

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Going Out of Business
OPEN HOUSE SALE
FOR FIVE DAYS
All our choice rugs are on display. You are welcome to
inspect oll these fine pieces that we have collected in the post
years. These fine
"ORIN TAL RUGS
include Kashon, Tabriz, Sorook, Heriz, etc.
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All are marked at lgw prices.
Open from 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M., Evenings by appointment
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It Starts wN .y
AT THE CAMPUS BOOTERY -STATE STREET
AIN UAL COLLEGE-E ND
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Men's and
This Will Be A Real Sale. We Must Greatly Reduce
$30,000.00 STOCK of 1NE SH
Before Thousands of Students, Teachers and others leave Ann Arbor for the s
vacation: New shoes just arrived included in this, our greatest sale in years.
FOR MEN FOR WOMEN
10%-25% to 25% OFF 15%-25% to 50% C
New styles by Bostonian, Weyenberg, Newest styles - Over 1,500 pairs b
Plymouth, Pine Tree, Saco-Moc and some sheim, Foot Rest, Jolene, Dolmode,
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Our
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