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May 21, 1951 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-21

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1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

From Stagecoach to Tea, Ruthven a Busy Man

ENROLLMENT DOUBLES:
'U' Expands, Changes Under Ruthven

"

* * *

* * *

* * *

(Continued from Page 1)
system without interfering
other types of housing."

with

STUDENT HONORS PRESIDENT WITH HAWAIIAN LEI
IGH TURNOVER:
American Colleges Pick
New Chiefs in Droves

PRESIDENT AND MRS. RUTHVEN GET WESTERN WELCOME ON STAGECOACH IN CHEYENNE

LESS NOTICEABLE than the
growth of the campus' supply of
buildings have been important
changes in administrative policy
inaugurated by President Ruth-
ven.
Realizing the impossibility of
having one man plan all the ad-
ministrative work of the Univer-
sity, President -Ruthven has fol-
lowed a careful plan of delegatingy
specific responsibilities to im-
portant staff officers.I
In his administrative planning,i
the President has followed prin-
ciples used by large commercial
corporations. He has given'
much power to various commit-
tees and boards, and has set up
special departments of finance,
University relations and invest-
ments.
Some educators consider these
administrative improvements as
the most significant and lasting of
President Ruthven's contributions
to the University.
* 0 *
SHORTLY AFTER President
Ruthven took office, the 1929 stock
market crash heralded the arrival
of the most serious depression in
the nation's history. This meant
that the new president was forced
to cope with a major crisis without
much chance to become acquainted
with his job.
With the depression came a
reduction in student enrollment
-many parents could no longer
afford to send their sons and
daughters to college. This led to
drops in tuition, and the Uni-
versity soon found itself in a
state of financial insecurity.
After drastic income cuts in the
1932-33 year, things began to get
better with a slight increase in en-
rollment in 1934. Thanks to intelli-
gent administration of scant re-
sources, the University got through
the worst of the economic storm
with very little damage.
* * *
BUT THE depression years gave
rise to a touchy problem. In the
late thirties the University was
faced with a surge of radicalism.
A small body of allegedly subver-
sive students created quite a stir
on the campus, and some were ex-
pelled.
President Ruthven explained
that disciplinary action taken
against these students came as a
-

result of their consistent violation
of University rules, and not be-c
cause of their political beliefs. I
During the depression, Univer-
sity expansion did not stop. Thec
Extension Service, the Detroit
and Grand Rapids branches ofe
the University, the Internationals
Center and the School of Publict
Health began during the 1930's.
The depression hardly had ended
when the University, along with
the rest of the nation, found itself
in the midst of World War II. This
meant that the University's facili-
ties had to be directed toward the
national defense effort to a great
extent.
* * * .
DURING THE WAR the Uni-
versity trained men for the Army's
Judge Advocate General's School,
the Military Intelligence Language1
School, the Civil Affairs Training;
School and the Navy V-12 pro-
gram. At the same time it went
about its business in such a way
that thousands of civilian stu-
dents received a general college
education.
The war years gave President
Ruthven one of his most difficult
problems-that of "trying to
convince the people of the United
States that after all the safety
of the country depends on the-
development of an educated citi-
zen."
The British government recog-
nized this problem during World
War II, after ignoring it with near-
ly disastrous results after World
War I. To plan for postwar educa-
tion, the British held discussions
on this problem with President
Ruthven during the middle of the
war.
* * *
WITH THE END of the war
came new problems for the Ruth-
ven administration. With the pas-
sage of the GI bill, thousands of
veterans swarmed into the Univer-
sity. Temporary housing was set up
at Willow Run, as residence halls
were filled almost to the bursting
point.
At the same time, the most re-
cent phase of the University's
construction program was
launched.
The post-war years also saw the
beginning of the Michigan Memor-
ial-Phoenix Project, described by
President Ruthven as "a great sort
of satisfaction." Well over half the
goal of pledges of $6,500,000 for
peacetime atomic research has
been met already.

DURING HIS 22 years as leader
of the University, President Ruth-
ven has formulated some very defi-
nite ideas on the educational pro-
cess.
Perhaps these ideas can best be
expressed by a statement he made
shortly after his appbintment to
the presidency. In President Ruth-
ven's words:
"The ideal institution of high-
er learning should be ever grow-
ing, ever developing, always fill-
ing the needs of the present as
civilization changes and yet al-
ways out of adjustment with so-
ciety because anticipating the
future."
More specifically he believes
that the University should perform
three important functions -
"teaching, research and service to
the public, with the latter subser-
vient to the other two functions;"
"There is no advancement in
education without research," he
has emphasized.
* . s
EDUCATION is not something
for the privileged few, according to
President Ruthven. "I believe in
free public education. Our citizens
have an obligation to support edu-
cation at all levels."
Naturally, President Ruthven
has observed great changes in
the student body since 1929.
"There was more of the 'high-
school attitude' in early years.
Students now are, much more
mature than those of 20 years
ago--they are much more in-
terested in serious activities."
President Ruthven has offered
high praise to the University's
teaching staff. In his words, "I
don't believe any other president
has had more cooperation from
the faculty."
When he leaves his office on
June 30,,President Ruthven will
look back on a longer tenure
than any other University presi-
dent, except for James B. Angell,
who was president for 38 years
between 1871,1909.
The retiring president's first job
at the University was that of a
teaching assistant. He has traveled
a long and successful path since
then. When he leaves his position,
he will carry with him the best
wishes of the thousands of stu-
dents and alumni who have bene-
fited from his good judgment dur-
ing his years of service to the Uni-
versity.

4

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A.
Al"

(4,

(Continued from Page 1)
zation posts and other govern-
ment positions.
Thirty-one of the departing
presidents said good-by to cap and
gowns forever and: retired into a
committeeless, conferenceless ely-
slum of home, horses, and grand-
children. Eight of: the vacancies
were brought aboutby deaths. One
appointee had no predecessors at
all. He was named the first presi-
dent of the newly established
Southwest Virginia: College, Wise,
Va.
* *S * -
THE TREND in president-nam-
ing has been for colleges to seek
their new top executives outside
the ranks of their own administra-
tion and faculty. Among last year's
99, only 21 appointments proved
the exception, and most of these
were made by the smaller schools.
Judging from the statistics, the
way to become a college president
is to be a college dean. Last year,
25 deans were rewarded with such
advancements. The prestige of al-
ready being a college president also
had an influence on prexy-seeking
regents and trustees, who last year
called 14 such presidents to iden-
tical but more prominent posts.
The same number of professors
made the grade: one each in lan-
guage, philosophy, political science,
English and mathematics; two in
psychology, three in education, and
four in history.
*0 *
AMONG THE more significant
top appointments of the year were
the following:
Boston University: The Rev.
Harold C. Case, former pastor,
First Methodist Church, Pasadena.
Buffalo University: Thomas R.
McConnell, former dean, College of
Science, Literature and the Arts,
University of Minnesota.
Cornell University: Deane Waldo
Malott, former chancellor, Univer-
sity of Kansas.
Louisiana State University: Lt.-

Gen. Troy H. Middleton, com-
mander of the 45th Division dur-
ing World ,War 11.
Montana State University: Carl
McFarland, former United States
assistant Attorney-General.
Pennsylvania State College: Mil-
ton S. Eisenhower, former presi-
dent, Kansas State College.
Texas Agricultural and Me-
chanical College: Marion Thomas
Harrington, former dean, School
of Arts and Sciences, Texas Agri-
cultural and Mechanical College.
University of Chicago: Lawrence
A. Kimpton, former vice-president
in charge of university develop-
ment, University of Chicago
University of Delaware: John A.
Perkins, former assistant provost
and professor of political science,
University of Michigan.
University of Denver: Malcolm
A. Love, former dean, College of
Arts and Sciences, University of
Denver.
University of Georgia: Omer C.
Aderhold, former dean, College of
Education, University of Georgia.
University of New Hampshire:
Robert F. Chandler, Jr., former
dean, College of Agriculture, Uni-
versity of New Hampshire.
University of North Carolina:
Gordon Gray, former Secretary of
the Army.
University of Portland: The. Rev.
Robert H. Sweeney, former vice-
president, University of Portland.
University of Rochester: Cornelis
W. de Kiewiet, former acting presi-
dent, Cornell University.
University of Texas: James P.
Hart, former Associate Justice,
Texas Supreme Court.
University of Toledo: Asa S.
Knowles, former vice-president,
Cornell University.
Utah State Agricultural College:
Lpuis L. Madsen, former chairman,
Department of Animal Husbandry,
Utah State Agricultural College.
Yale University: Alfred Whitney
Griswold, former professor of his-
tory, Yale.

1

L
/-

RUTHVEN PRESIDES AT GRADUATION -A HAPPY TIME FOR COLLEGE PRESIDENTS

0

M

...

,

I --
4.2

Congratulations
to the new addition
to our University family.

4'

Let us take care of the new additions to your wardrobe.

-Courtesy Ann Arbor News
STUDENT GUESTS MEET THE RUTHVENS IN TRADITIONAL WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON TEA

Any suit cleaned ... 89c

U

.....-

1

I

.

Compliments of

A&P CLEANERS

Overbeck Book Store

121 East Liberty

Ii

A-

E. C. OVERBECK, CLASS OF '22

I

Specializing in
medical - dental - nursing -law
public health books

1216 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

i "

f- -- .------ -- ---- -- --------- - -- - --- -- ---- ------ -- -----
-_.______ _____---------Ili

I

,I

WAHR'S UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE

Extends its Congratulations to

,

PRESIDENT RUTHVEN
For His Years of Wonderful Work
-In ai % ;,Liyrn

Honey Beige
BOOT STRAP
Wedgie by JOYCE

4
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