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May 22, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-22

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SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Student Finds Joy in Convent

By MARY LETSIS
ie myth that a young woman'
rs a convent to flee from the
realities of life was blasted
erday by Pat Madden who left
University in February to be-
e a Dominican Teaching Sis-
it Adrian.
isitors to the convent expect
e a group of neurotic women
ag in the corners, shrinking
1 cruel, cruel life. They're us-
7 a little surprised when they
just the opposite to be true,"
said.
k* *
LT, A FORMER student in

;, _ _____

the College of Architecture and
Design, lived at Henderson House.
While here, she participated in
many extra-curricular activities
including the Soph Cabaret, Span-
ish Club, Newman Club, Hender-
son House Council and the Bas-
ketball Club.
"I guess you could say that
'I leaped behind the wall' from
the liberalism of the University.
I gradually saw that God came
first, made the decision-and
have since known a peace of
mind, that only comes from
doing the right thing," she said.

WNS OVERFLOW :
classes Flock Out-of-doors
En Effort To Beat Heat Wave

(*.

By CARA CHERNIAK
Spring is taking an intellectual
ring - or at least that's what
any instructors tell their stu-
nts as they leave their hot stuffy
assrooms for the crowded lawns
the campus.
This practice, although not ac-
pted wholeheartedly by many
niversity officials, is left up to
e discretion of the individual
structors. Many classes find it
imulating to absorb Shakespeare
philosophy by stretching out on
e cool green lawns.
* * *
MOST STUDENTS feel that
tdoor classes lend a pleasing
sual atmosphere while not dis-
acting too much from their good
>rk. However, George Broderick,
L, ha quite a different attitude.
feel It creates an atmosphere
childishness and creates a bad
ipression of the University in the
es of outsiders when they see
own people on the lawn trying
absorb knowledge," he said.
Other disadvantages noted by
tudents include noise from the
onstruction work behind Angell
[all and the innumerable bugs
hat crawl over books and cloth-
ng. One student said she was
lozart Work
VlkBe Sung
Mozart's "Requiem" will be sung
the University Choir with May-
,rd Klein conducting at 8:30 p.m.
lay in Hill Auditorium.
Peatured soloists for the per-
rmance will be Rose Marie Jun,
prano; Gloria Gonan, contralto;
id Shelton, tenor; and Robert
son, baritone. All members of
e quartet are graduate students
the music school.
George Exon will be choir ac-
rnpanist. The concert is open
the public free of charge.

especially distracted by the
"birds and the bees."
But the main trouble, as far as
some students are concerned, is
that these outdoor classes are
limited only to small discussion
groups.
* * *
Upon a suggestion that he
hold a class of approximately 400
students on the library steps, Prof.
Robert Heyns of the psychology
department quipped, "Judging
from the number of vacant seats,
this might be a good way of join-
ing the absent students."
The Romance Language depart-
ment has outlawed this lawn prac-
tice completely. Irving A. Leon-
ard, chairman of the Romance
Language department, said that
it has proved unsuccessful in past
years.
Ma'Idern Garg
To Be Sold.
Tomorrow
The Gargoyle will go modern to-
morrow when it invades the cam-
pus for the last time this semester.
Carrying. the modern design
angle from cover to cover, the
Garg will feature a modern drama,
a futuristic furniture exhibit, a
smattering of poetry, and an ab-
sorbing science fiction story.
Prominently displayed in an
eight page insert, will be the Gar-
goyle's entry in next year's Union
Opera scripts. The play will star
three amoebae and a revolting cur-
tain. Double Dick will make his
farewell appearance in this issue
in a manner fitting his character.
The dinosaur chase will wend its
way through four joke filled pages
and an artist's conception of wom-
en in the Union will help round
out the humor magazine.

Pat's convent day begins at 5:10
a.m. and continues until 9:30 p.m.
when lights go out.
"And it's a pretty full one at
that. Prayer is interspersed be-
tween our classes which include
both religious and academic sub-
jects. We continue our college
education right here in the con-
vent until we get our teacher's
certificate," she explained.
* * *
THE NEXT STEP for Pat will
be the taking of her temporary
vows after this introductory two-
year period. During this time the
fundamentals of the religious life
will be studied.
"These temporary vows last
for one yearand -re renewed
each year. But what most peo-
ple don't know is that a novice
can leave a convent at any time
-vows or no. No one is bound
to stay here if they discover
they've taken the wrong step."
Of the three vows - poverty,
obedience, chastity-that a nun is
required to embrace, obedience
calls for the greatest amount of
adjustment Pat said.
"Actually, there is no restric-
tion of free will in a convent. As
obedience itself is an inclination
of the will to recognize legitimate
authority, by 'following the bell'
we are given an opportunity to
express that, voluntary obedience
we chose in the first place."
* * *
ALTHOUGH PAT doesn't regret
her move, she admits that she
does miss the everyday joys of
outside life now and then
"I used to like my cigarette with
a cup of coffee just like anyone
else. But you have to enter into
this state of life with both eyes
wide open. I knew Id have to give
them up-so I did, that's all. And
the happiness I've since felt just
can't be measured by material
things.
"My values have changed since
I've become a nun, naturally. But
I still think Michigan has the
greatest football team yet."
Adult Institute
To Convene
Here Today
With the slogan of "Learning,
for Living," the Adult. Education
Institute will begin its annual
three-day convention in Ann Ar-
bor today.
The institute is sponsored by
the University's Extension Service
and the Michigan State Federation
of Women's Clubs.
According to University program
directors the Institute is designed
to implement intelligent living and
citizenship in a changing world.
President Ruthven will greet the
gathering at 10:45 a.m. today in
the Rackham Lecture Hall.-Among
the other speakers on today's
agenda are Dean George Brown
of the engineering college, who
will discuss society's nuclear en-
ergy problem and Prof. Marshall
Knappen, of the political science
department, who will speak on the
foreign policy of the United States.
These will be followed on Wed-
nesday and Thursday by other
speakers on problems of current
interest.

Magazine
Article Hits
Sororities
By HARRIETT TEPPERMAN
"College sororities should be
abolished from American campuses
as hotbeds of snobbery, intellectual
dishonesty and racial discrimina-
tion," Rosanne Smith Robinson
charges in a "Look" magazine
article that appears in the issue
which will hit the stands today.
A graduate of the class of '43
from Northwestern University,
Mrs. Robinson resigned from her
sorority at the end of her junior
year. She believes sororities rob a
girl of the ability to think for her-
self and substitute an expertness
in "the tricks of that most pathe-
tic and selfish avocation-social
climbing with all its opportunism
and pretension."
, - * *
CAMPUS REACTION to such
abolition was strong in both pro
or con answers. Adele Hager, '51,
who also resigned from her sorori-
ty said, "When a girl becomes a
member her values become twisted
so that only keeping up with her
'sisters' is important."
On racial and religious dis-
crimination, Mrs. Robinson cites
the fact that most sororities
limit their Catholic membership
to 10%, and that Jewish girls
cannot be pledged by gentile
sororities "unless' they are ex-
ceptionally beautiful, talented or
rich."
Margery Himmetreich, '54, a new
sorority active, supports the sys-
tem, "Sororities provide a girl with
a home-away-from-home where
you can make close friends instead
of many acquaintances."
* * *
FRATERNITY MEN, too, were
varied in their opinions of sorori-
ties.
Richard Demmer, '53, said,
"sororities are a vital cog in cam-
pus activities, and they add to
campus color and glamour."
Sam Altman, '51, however,
claimed, "For my money they can
be abolished-they aren't of any
use to the girls."

n- _ _

V. V. McNitt, president of the
McNaught Syndicate of New York,
will address the fourth annual
Honors Convocation of the de-
partment of journalism at 3 p.m.
tomorrow in Rm. 1025 Angell Hall.
In addition to his lecture,
"Problems and Retrospect of
Newspapering," McNitt will pre-
4. * *

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
NAVY MANEUVERS - Jim Moore, '53, Admiral of the 'Great
Navy of Nebraska,' puts one of his ships through its daily ma-
neuvers. The faucet creates "cloud bursts" which were common
in Nebraska during the early 1500's. As he is an inactive admiral,
Moore is forced to wear a NROTC cap.
* * * *
ExMarie Awaits Call
From Nebraska Navy

V. V. McNITT
Speech Clinic Test
Men who stutter or stammer are
urged to come to the Speech Clinic
tomorrow, Thursday or Friday
afternoon this week for a short
testing period, or to call the clinic
at Extension 2285 for an appoint-
ment, the Clinic has announced.

sent the major journalism school
awards; the four McNayght Med-
als for excellence in journalism,
graduate studies, reporting .and
editorial writing.
* * *
OTHER ,HONORS to be con-
ferred by McNitt include six Sig-
ma Delta Chi scholarship recogni-
tion certificates, departmental
certificates in journalism and in
general university studies and the
names of those elected to Kappa
Tau Alpha, the national Journa-
lism honor society.
McNitt entered the University
in 1900 as a special student in
journalism. He was awarded an
honorary Master of Arts degree
by the University in 1934.
His lecture will be based on al-
most fifty years of journalistic
experience. He started with the
Conneaut Ohio Evening News
staff as a reporter in 1902, be-
coming editor and manager two
years later.
Currently McNitt Is president
of two local newspapers.
VACATION STARTS.
at the
RAILROAD STATION
And You Can SAVE up to 28%
on GROUP COACH TICKETS
Here's the Low-Down on Low Cost!.
Gather a group of 25 or more
heading home in the same direc-
tion at the same time. Buy GROUS
PLAN tickets. Each group mem-
ber sAVEs 28% compared to reg-
ular round-trip fares, or up to
45% compared to buying one-j
way tickets in each directionl
Go Together-Return as You Pleaset
You all leave on one train. But
you can return separately, in time
for reopening of school. Group
Plan savings apply as far as you
all go together. Then buy indi-t
vidual round-trip tickets the rest'
of the way.
Plan Your Group Plan Savings NOW
Your nearest railroad passenger
agent will help you organize a
group to get these big savings...
good on most coach trains east of
Chicago or St. Louis, north of the
Ohio and Potomac Rivers, and
west of New York City.
Or, if you're traveling alone.
save on Regular Round-Tripa.,

TUESDAY, MAY 2, M1951
TO PRESENT AWARDS:
Journalism Convocation
To Hear McNitt Lecture

L

I

4 ,

(

/

e11

Jim Moore, '53, doesn't look
much like an admiral.
He strolls to his classes in marine
fatigue clothes, and talks mostly
of the wartime meals he cooked
while on the Pacific islands.
The only clues to his status in
the seafaring hierarchy are an im-
pressive scroll bearing ,his name
and his early morning occupation
of sailing toy boats in a sink.
* *. *
MOORE, a 24-year-old pre-law
student, is an admiral in the Great
Navy of the State of Nebraska. He
was installed in office last fall
when an appointment certificate
came through the mail signed by
Nebraska Gov. Val Peterson.
Although the forces which he
heads are of a somewhat nebu-
lous. composition, the certificate
does specify that "various offi-
cers, seamen, tadpoles and gold-
fish" fall under Moore's com-
mand.
The Detroit junior is reportedly
the only such naval officer on
campus, with the eminent excep-
tion of President Alexander G.
Ruthven. Although he had thought
he was the only campus figure
vested with the office, Moore was
not at all surprised when greeted
with the news of President Ruth-
'Ensians Remain
To Be Collected
Two-thirds of this year's 'En-
sians have already been picked up,
according to distribution manager
Peg Blackford.
Students who have not yet
picked up\ their copies may do so
on the second floor of the Student
Publications biulding between
noon and 5 p.m. today.
Lo'cal bookstores have copies for
those who did not order them in
advance. No 'Ensians are being
sold now at the Publications build-
ing.

ven's equal status: "Those of us
who have traveled extensively are
all eligible for this lofty station."
* * *
MOORE, a staff assistant in
Greene House, was a corporal in
the Marines' Second Division dur-
ing the war. He considers his pro-
motion "a great hofior and recog-
nition of qualities which are often
overlooked in the modern world."
He cited his great affection for
tadpoles and goldfishes as one
of the big factors contributing to
his success. "My main duty is to
protect the inherent rights of
these creatures," he said.
Moore admitted that his mari-
time duties are "not too press-
ing." He keeps in tactical shape by
putting a small ship through noc-
turnal maneuvers in a sink. "Only
in an extreme emergency, such as
heavy rainfall in Nebraska, are we
admirals called to active duty," he
noted.
Requirements for the office are
vague, but Moore is sure that a
speaking acquaintance with at
least three tadpoles and two gold-
fish is an absolute prerequisite.
"Seeing as how Val is a Republican
governor, I should also admit that
being a good Republican is a slight
asset," he conceded.

f'

SUMMER

I

_

'I

Business Greers
VIA
THE V
COLLEGE
4-MONTH INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING for
COLLEGE STUDENTS and GRADUATES
Starting June, October, February
j Bulletin A, on request.
Registration now open.
NEXT COURSE STARTS JUNE
Lifetime Placement Service
Write Admission Counselor
Co-Educational " G. I. Approved
THE GREGG COLLEGE
E7 South Wabash Avenue. Chicago 2, Ilnois
Phone STate 2-1884

JOB?
"Make hay while
the sun shines!"
Good Humor ice Cream
Company has high-earn-
ing established routes
open for the summer.
Can place both drivers
and non-drivers.
Contact the branch near-
est your home.
GOOD HUMOR CORP.
2736 Armitage Ave., Ohicago, Ill.
6844 Wagner Ave., Detroit, Mich.
25 James St., New Haven Conn.
664 So. 15th St., Newark, N.J.
115 E. 3d St., Mt. Vernon, N.Y.
426 Long Beach Rd., Oceanside NY
322 Rutledge St.. Brooklyn, N.Y.
818 Bleigh Ave., Philadelphia, Pa.

I(,

For Comfort and Safety
IN ANY WEATHER
Take The Train!

4

EASTERN RAILROADS'

{

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L

SS.S. VOLENDAM
TO
EUROPE
"Thrifty" Co-ed Student Sailing

join the student group this summer
to Rotterdam on the S. S. VOLEN-
DAM, host to over 4000 students on
thre annual sailings since 1948. Re-
turn sailing September 5 from
Rotterdam.
Dormitory type accommodations.
Plenty of deck space. Large, public
rooms. Good and plentiful menu.
High standards of Dutch seaman-
ship, cleanliness, and traditional
friendliness.

Staff of 20 distinguished Europeav
and American lecturers, under the
joint direction of Netherlands Office
for Foreign Student Relations and
U. S. National Student Association
offer a comprehensive Orientation
Program enroute.
ORovnd Trip for dormitory.
Rype pace. $320 for ml
*$b" ci2
30 type-s
women.
Applications from bona fide college
students only are being accepted by

11

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2

NETHERLANDS OFFICE FOR FOREIGN STUDENT RELATIONS
29 Broadway, New York 6, N. Y.
Agents for the Ministerie van Verkeer en Waterstaat
Y IDirectorate-General of Shipping) The Hague. Netherlands
CAN YOU COMPLETE THIS R E BUS ?
The answer is an "often quoted" saying by a famous American.

Hq LHUNDRY SERVICE
STUDENT
B UNDL IE
4BS. OC
minimum
12c each additional pound
All your clothing laundered,
FLUFF DRIED and NEATLY, FOLDED ,
LOW EXTRA CHARGE
for finishing these articles 1

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THAN ANY OTHER CIGARETE!
Fine tobacco-and only fine tobacco-can
give you a better-tasting cigarette. And
L.S./M.F.T.-Lucky Strike means fine to-
bacco. So, for the best-tasting cigarette you
ever smoked, Be Happy-Go Lucky! How
about startin' with a carton-today?
LS./M.F.t- Lucky Strike
means Pine ToIco

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