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May 13, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-13

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THE MICRIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 1951

U

PIPE-PUFFING WALSH LEAVES:

Ten-Election Winner Quits'U' Spotlight

Cast of Drama Festival
Gets Additional Players

LOOK and LISTEN

... with HARRY REED

0 a-- a

4

An impressive list of supporting
players has been added to the
casts for the Ann Arbor Drama
Season's five plays.
Philip Tonge, Noel Leslie, Royal
Beal, Norman Shelly and Jon
Dawson will appear in "Captain
Brassbound's Conversion" which
will initiate the season's run Tues-
day. Stars of this play are Edna
Best and John Archer.
TONGE WHO will appear in all
the productions, and Dawson have
both been members of the resident
company of the Drama Season for
Peace Treaty
To Be Subject
Of TV Hour

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
THOMAS "PERENNIAL PIPE" WALSH1

* * *

* * *

new organizations with discrim-
inatory clauses in their, constitu-
tions, was adopted almost unani-
mously by delegates from 350
member schools.
Other projects where the fa-
mous Walsh pipe has fumed are:
Democratic state conventions;
the Crusade for Freedom; the
Case Club, where he has been a
senior judge; the Jefferson-
Jackson Day dinners; and the
faculty grading program.
Wash began cutting down on
campus activities last fall "to tie
up a few loose ends in Law School"
but retained his place in the lime-
light by continuing to "take out
my frustrated journalism on the

readers of The Daily letters col-
umn" and retaining his seat on
the SL.
As a convincing and lucid letter-
writer he gained many readers,
but it was on the floor of the SL
that he earned the highest respect
of his fellow students. Presenting
an average of two motions per
meeting over a five year period, he
was well-known for his painstak-
ing, legalistic orations.
Fellow legislators recall the time
when Walsh was required to give
his name at the beginning of a
term on the legislature, concurred
and somebody piped up: "That's
the shortest speech Walsh ever
made."

Last Generation of Semester
To Be Larger, Emphasize Art

Japan and the forthcoming
peace treaty will be the subject of
Telecourse Four, "Lands and Peo-
ples of the Far East" on the Uni-
versity's television hour at 1 p.m.
today over WWJ-TV.
Robert Ward of the political
science department, who recent-
ly rettrned from Japan, will dis-
cuss the subject.
Women's athletic activities will
be featured on the campus tele-
tour.
Prof. Margaret Bell of the phy-
sical education department and
Marie Hartwig, physical education
supervisor, will discuss the Wo-
men's Athletic Association with
Marilyn Thisted, '51, and Abby
Funk, '52, student officers of the
association.
Films of various women's athle-
tic clubs will be shown.
On telecourse six, "Retailing
and the Customer," lesson four,
"Salesmanship" will be presented,
and skits will illustrate various
selling situations.
ICampus
Calendar
Coming Events
PROF. FRANK BEACH of Yale
University will give a lecture un
der the auspices of the psychology
department entitled "Physiologi-
cal Control of Reproductive Be-
havior" at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in
Kellogg Auditorium.
PROF. T. K. COWDEN, head of
the Department of Agricultural
Economics at Michigan State
College, will speak on "Agricul-
tural Programs and Problems," at
7:45 p.m. tomorrow in Rackham
Amphitheatre.
THE PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
will feature Dr. Charles Newton as
guest speaker at their next meet-
ing at 7:30 Wed., May 16, in Rm.
1400, Chemistry Bldg.
An Ann Arbor physician, Dr.
Newton will speak on aspects of
a private practice. An informal
discussion will follow the talk.
Deadline Extended
The Union has extended the
deadline for fall semester orienta-
tion leader applications to noon
tomorrow.
Students interested can get ap-
plications in the Union's student
offices.

several years, and are currently
appearing in the famous ANTA
Album in New York.
Beal, a veteran actor of both
the stage and screen, has been
in the road company of "Death
of a Salesman" for the past two
years. Leslie first appeared in
Ann Arbor with the Ben Great
Players in 1913 and since then
has worked both as a . director
and actor in innumerable pro-
ductions here.
The cast of "Captain Brass-
bound's Conversion" have been re-
hearsing in Ann Arbor since Mon-
day. I
SCHEDULED TO arrive tomor-
row are the players for the second
production, "Ring Around the
Moon," which stages Lucille Wat-
son.
Four actors who played in the
New York presentation with
Miss Watson will appear in the
Drama Season production. They
are Cynthia Latham, Betty Low,
William Allyn and Neva Pat-
terson.
Also included in this cast will
be Leslie, Boris Marshalov and
Grace Kelly. .
APPEARING WITH star Henry
Daniell in "The Cocktail Party,"
will be Madeleine Clive, Edward
Ashley, Miss Patterson and Pame-
la Simpson. Miss Simpson ap-
peared here last year in "The Win-
slow Boy" with Basil Rathbone.
Engaged for the last play -of
the season is Whitford Kane,
currently active as a television
actor. Working with him will
be Ray Boyle, Oliver Thorndike
and Miss Simpson.hBethel Les-
lie is the star of this show.
Both season and single tickets
are still available. The season ad-
mittance will be sold through Fri-
day. The costs are $12, $9.60,
$7.20 and $4.80 for evenings and
$7.20 and $4.80 for mtatinee per-
formances. Single tickets are
available for all performances for
$3.00, $2.40, $1.80 and $1.20.
All seats may be obtained at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre box
office or by sending a mail order
to the Ann Arbor Drama Season,
in care of the League.
Literary College
Holds Final Talks
The last Literary College Con-
ference of the year will be held
from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday,
in Rm. A-B of the League.
Dean Hayword Keniston will'
report to the students and faculty
present on the results of the stu-
dent faculty evaluations that were
carried on last year. This will be
the first open report made to the
students concerning this informa-
tion.
He also will discuss the major
and significant results and the
present and future use of the eval-
uation results.
A period will follow his presen-
tation for questions and sugges-
tions.

Alpha Delta Phi, the oldest col-"
lege sorority in the world, will re-
ceive tribute on Ronald Colman's
"Halls of Ivy" show at 8 p.m.
Wednesday over WWJ.
Maxine Blake, the national
president, will present Mrs. Col-
man with an award for her por-
trayal of the wife of a college
president. The show itself has
gathered enoukh awards to fill
several columns.
RALPH BUNCHE, UN official
recently named as graduation
speaker, will appear on Kate
Smith's TV show Tuesday. The
director of the department of
Trusteeship will be interviewed
by Ted Collins.
* * *
FOR A GOOD breakdown of
what it takes to produce a TV
show, the Look magazine now on
the stands offers a good eye-
opener. It shows that it takes 131
people 331 man hours to stage
each "Fred Waring" show.
This doesn't include 51 non-
staff people, scenery builders,
packers, seamstresses and truck-
ers who put in another 144 man
hours.
All this for a production number
averaging two minutes five sec-
onds in time. It takes that much
to make music look as good as it
sounds.
AN NBC RELEASE claims Bob
Hope claims he recently visited a
large army base in California
where the GIs don't like to date
the local 'girls. Seems the girls all
work as lettuce pickers, and on
dates all they do is feel the boys'
heads to see if they'd fit into the

A

crates. NBC did not report any of
the GIs''actions.
Jane Morgan, "The Girl from
Paris" according to her radio
show title, comes from New
England, naturally.
If you can't pay a coach enough,
get him a radio program and let
him sound off there and earn
some money to boot.
Yale's Coach Herman Hickman,
a 300 pound Phi Bete who talks
like he just fell off a Tennessee
mountain, is a good example of
this.
Between interviewing celebri-
ties and spinning tales of the
South, the chunky coach at

OUR'WINDOW PANE CHECKED BLOUSE

I.,

,,,

Generation will make its last
appearance for the year on Wed-
resday when the 96 page issue
will be sold at various points on
campus.
The emphasis will be placed on
art, and more people, including
several new contributors, will be
represented in this issue than in
any previous one. Thirty pages
will be devoted to a variety of art,

0IMPORTED ARTICLES
CC
INDIA ART SHOP 0
330 Maynard Street

New Haven keeps up with sports
in the off season. This year he's
going to master-mind the East-
ern All Stars gamde at Chicago
this July.
A RUMOR is making the rounds
of radio columns, magazines, gag
shows and other quiet sources
that Groucho Marx has grown his
own mustache and given his old
greasepaint one the go by.
This sounds like a great move,
because millions of people might
drop their teeth if they saw their
comic idol nude on the upper lip
region. No more falsies for Grou
cho.

and several pages will feature
photography.
9* s
HIGH SPOTS of the art sec-
tion include a painting entitled
"Indecision," by John Goodyear,
'52 A, and "Head of a Woman"
by Judy Feinberg, '53A. There
also will be a double page spread
showing sketches of the mural in:
the Coffee Shop at the League,
while a photograph of a sculp-
ture by Hal McIntosh, '51A, will
be a part of the photography sec-
tion.
A short story, "Mr. Thomason,
The Barber," is the contribution
of Jack Ferris, Grad., who receiv-
ed a Hopwood award for it last
summer.
Dick Burgwyn, Grad., who has
acted in many of the speech de-
partment productions, has writ-
ten an article, "Square Deal for
the Circle," in reply to "Arena
Theatre 1951" which appeared in
the last issue. Featured poetry
will include "Homage to Rose Se-
lavie" and "Women" by Frank
O'Hara, Grad.
Read Daily Classifieds

Han To Speak
On Korea here
Pyo Wook Han, First Secretary
of the Korean Embassy in Wash-
ington, will speak at 4:15 p.m. to-
morrow in Architecture Auditor-
ium.
Han's address on "Korea Meets
the Challenge of War" is spon-
sored by the political science de-
partment and will be open to the
public.
Born in Korea, the secretary
has received degrees from Syra-
cuse University and Harvard Uni-
versity and was associated with
the Division of Orientalia of the
Library of Congress in Washing-
ton.
He has served as Korean dele-
gate to the Food and Agricultural
Organization of the United Na-
tions as well as acting as alter-
nate observer at the UN from
Korea.
Han has held his present post
at the Korean Embassy since 1949.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

FRESH FASHION EXCITEMENT in this window pane check
blouse-self -piped-pearl button closing and peter pan
collar. You'll find color combinations of aqua and coral,
black and coral, leaf green and wine, lilac and forest green
to choose from. The fabric is washable combed gingham-
sanforized, colorfast. Sizes 30,to 38.
ANN ARBoE. MAIN AT LIBERTY
Only the finest quality at prices that are fair.

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DOZENS of other beautiful
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