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May 09, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-09

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sLr

THE MICHIGAN DA ILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1951

AL RUN SOON:
Load Shows Will Give
b'ikado' Group Polish
in the Gilbert and Sullivan e~a ro~n. mahna in

ty bits the Pattengill Audi-
m stage next week with their
iction of "The Mikado,"
II be brimming with exPeri-
that doesn't come from or-
.y rehearsals.
get that bit of extra work
ti makes for a polished pro-
.on, the cast is performing
show before the Hillsdale
riber of Commerce Friday,
in Detroit's Rackham Audi-
m Saturday, and should be
neat shape for the local run
tor James Ueberhcordin.
* *-*
HE MIKADO" concerns the
irous adventures of Nanki-
the son of the Japanese em-
r~, who runs away from a
a marriage to an elderly spin-
mial Schoolh
riniversary
> Be Marked

['he School of Dentistry will
.rk its 75th Anniversary and
mnecoming Celebration tomor-
v with a day long program fea-
'ing speakers, luncheons and
iferences.
L'he program will open at 9:30
ri. sit Rackham Lecture Hall
~h addresses on the develop-
nt of dentistry and on the
hool of Dentistry by Deans
leritus Marcus L. Ward and
~ssell W. Bunting.
* * *
FOMORROW morning's pro-
im will also include an address
Prof. Arthur B. Gable of the
dversity of Pennsylvania on
he Future Outlook of the Air-
asive Technic on the Practice
Dentistry."
Dr. Francis A. Arnold, Jr., As-
>ciate Director of the National
ristitute for Dental Research
a Washington will conclude
ie morning program with an
ddress on "The Present Status
!' the Water-Fluoridation Stu-
les."
rhe Dentistry Homecoming will
ntinue with a luncheon at 12:15
n. at the Urgion. At this meet-
- President Alexander G. Ruth-
n and Provost James P. Adams
11 make addresses. Also histori-
I pictures of the School of Den-
try will be shown.
Roberto de la Rosa, Cultural
~nt wil be the luncheon's fea
ced speakers He will speak on
e subject, "The Other Amern-
a Way of Life."
At 3 p.m. the Homecoming cele-
ation will move to the dentistry
ilding for group conferences.
There will be a program for wo-
m at the Homecoming begin-
ig with a luncheon at 12:15 p.-
at the League and continuing

the errant son and Mary Jo Jones
will play Yuxn-Yum, the pretty
school-girl who attracts the regal
eye of roving Nanki-Poo.
Also cast are James Fudge as
Ko-Ko, David Murray as Pooh-
Balh, Vivien Milan as Pitti-Sing,
Donald Stout as Fish-Tush,
Barbara Johnson as Beep-Bo,
Frances Morse as Katisha, and
David Tolan as the Mikado.
A chorus of 30 and a 25 piece
orchestra under the direction of
William Boyer will add volume to
such favorites as "Flowers That
Bloom In The Spring" and "Three
Little Maids From School" for
which the show is well-known.
As an added attraction, a cur-
tain-raiser by Sullivan and Bun-
nand entitled "Cox and Box" will
precede the major presentation.
It is a farce concerning a shyster
landlord who trys to rent the
same room to a man working
nights and one working days.
wily landlod and Fank Pornreta
and Jim Ensign are the lodgers.
Tickets for the performances
are on sale daily from 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. at the Administration
Bldlg. A special student rate of 90
cents for all seats has been estab-
lished for Thursday's pe'rform-
ance. Friday and Saturday tickets
will be 90 cents and $1.20.
Events Today
ELECTION - Senior education
school students may vote for class
officers from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
the first floor of University Ele-
mentary School.
DISCUSSION -- The UNESCO
Council will sponsor a discussion
on "Ghandi and Non-Violence" at
7:30 p.m. in the International Cen-.
ter./
Participants will include DeWitt
C. Baldwin, director of thie Stu.-
dent Religious Association, and
two students from India, Naya
Deb and Hiru Shah, Grad.
Coining Events
LECTURE-Prof. Albert P. Lu-
per, of the University of Iowa, will
speak on "Portugese Music" at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow in Rackhamn
Amphitheatre.
BLOODMOBIL - A Red Cross
"bloodmobile" will be here from
noon until 2 p.m. Friday in front
of the Women's Athletic Bldg., to
accept donations to the Red Cross
bloodbank,
LECTURE--Vera Brown, De-
troit Times columnist, will speak
at the luncheon meeting of the
twenty-fourth annual Michigan
Interscholasti Press Association

To Launch
'U' NA ACP
Walter White, executive secre-
tary of the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored
People, will speak at 1 p.m. Friday
in Kellogg Auditorium to launch
a membership campaign for the
newly-formed campus chapter of
the NAACP.
The chapter's application for
University recognition was passed
yesterday by the Student Aff airs
Committee. This is the first timne
the NAACP has had a chapter on
this campus.
"One of the main reasons we
decided to form a local chapter
was to provide a centralizing ele-
ment for student interest in prob-
lems of discriminations and to
handle racial problems," Edward
Dawley '52L, president of the new
chapter said.
"The NAACP has developed
workable methods of combating
racial problems, and this chaptei-
will give students a chance to par-
ticipate in campus problems and
to gain practice for problems in
later life.",
Walter Clements, '52L, t h e
group's temporary secretary, said
the heads of all major campus or-
ganizations have received invita-
tions to join the NAACP member-
ship committee.
The NAACP is the largest na-
tional civil rights organization. It
has had such famous members as
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Ralph
Bunch, Harold Ickes and Walter
Reuther. White will be honored
at a luncheon in the League prior
to Friday's meeting.
To Make T or
Of AirBases
The Men's Glee. Club will take
an extended tour of Air Force bases
in the West and Midwest during
the next two months.
The first tour will include two
concerts at Scott Air Force Base,
Ill., May 26 and 27. Two C-57's
from the Base are scheduled to
pick up- the men at Willow Run
and bring them back the next day
in plenty of time for Monday
classes.
A more extensive tour of Air
Bases in Kansas, Oklahoma, Tex-
as, Colorado and Wyoming have
been tentatively scheduled for
eecting to be drafted immdi-
ately after commencement are
hoping for special permission to
make the tour.
Proposals for such a tour were
first made by two Air Force ma-
jors after bearing the Glee Club
perform in St. Louis during their
Spring tour. All expenses are be-
ing paid by the Air Force.
Clu will present it annua spring
Hill Auditorium. This perform-
ance, being given in honor of Mo-
ther's Day, is open to the public
free of charge.
Theatre Club Will
The Arts Theatre Club will per-
form as its final offering of the
season Jean Racine's tragedy
"Phaedra," beginning Friday and
continuig nightly except Mondays

The play is based on Euripides'
"Hippolytus" and concerns Phae-
dra, wife of Theseus, who falls in
love with her step-son Hippolytus
and having achieved his downfall
after he resists her advances, kills
herself in remorse.

Tag

Day

A tag today means a good time this summer for 225 Michigan
boys of all races and creeds.
The University's Fresh Air Camp, partly run by student contribu-
tions, is a unit of the Institute for Human Adjustment designed to
put underprivileged children's feet on the ground and give them two
months of varied recreational activities.
THE BOYS, whose ages. range from$ 8 to 14, are not all from
lower economic groups. However, half of them live with one parent

Set
* * * *

at

4

~z~K

-

or none. All are referred to the camn by a social agency.
The camp is under the direction of Prof. William C. Morse
of the education school and is staffed by University teachers,
camping specialists and counselors.
Eight boys live together with a counselor in ek.ch cabin. The
majority of the counselors are University graduate students in the
education school and the sociology and psychology departments.
* * * *
THE CAMP is located 24 miles northwest of Ann Arbor on Pat-
terson Lake, one of a chain of 7 small lakes near Pinckney. Property
comprises about 300 acres of for-4> * * *
est adjacent to a 1400-acre wild "'-
life preserve and near the 100,000-
acre state-owned Waterloo Recre- ~
ational Pr'oject. -

Annual Fund
Canmpus Groups
Await Turnout
Today is Tag Day.
bStudent vrolunters wil an
area to collect an expected $4,000
from students and additional funds
from faculty and other Ann Arbor
residents for the University's Freshi
Air Camp for underprivileged chil-
dren.
MONEY collected will be used to
defray about one-third of the
camp's operational costs. Chsarity
funds are allocated to paying for
food, equipment and some staff
salaries.
Campus groups promotig Tag
Day include the Student Legis-
lature, the Union, the League,
the Inter-Fraternity Council,
Panhellenic, the Association of
Indepen Ient Men, Assembly and
Alpha Phi Omega, service fra-
ternity. They hope to help boost
student contributions up to the
$4,000 quota.
The campus has not met its
quota since 1948. In 1949, student
gifts ran $1,500 short of the $5,000
mark which was lowered the fol-
lowing year. Last year, the goal
was missed by a small margin but
tow contributions from other Mich-
igan citizens chopped the budget
considerably.
** *
BULK OF the camp's- financial
needs is met by t11e University
Summer Session and the Institute
for Human Adjustment. Other
large sums are donated by indi-
vidual faculty members and Ann
Arbor and Detroit citizens.
Students have traditionally
outshone all other groups in
supplying money for the rela-
tively smnall budget requirement
fed by donations. No alumni
group9s have contributed since
Gifts from students and faculty
members are used for food, plant
maintenance, camping equipment,
craft materials and personnel for
medical service and cooking. Coun-
srs are provmie foranyethe Sum
mer Session while costs for gen-
eral administration and research
are met by the Institute.

I..

BUCKET BRIGADE-This is one of the scores of student volun-
teers who will man Tag Day buckets today.
* * * * * *

Activities include traditional
camp pastimes such as swim-
ming, games, overnight hikes,
crafts, movies and boating. A
work 'program is also provided
for campers.
Social agencies relate confiden-
tial data to the camp concerning
their charges. In turn, camp spe-
cialists return a study of the boy
to the agency including a daily log
of his behavior and an analysis of
his cabin group. . .
The camp, entering its 31st year
of operation, June 18, is believed
to be the first of its kind in the
country. Its main purpose is to
help what jagencies call "in-be-
tweens"--boys whose difficulties
may later lead to delinquencies if
not alleviated before maturity,
functiondsas a workshop inhuma
behavior for students interested
In the welfare and adjustment of
children.

2-

FRESH AIR CAMPERS-Underprivileged children at the University's Fresh Air Camnp line up for
a group portrait. More than 200 of these youngsters will attend the camp for two months this sum-
mer. The camp, soon to be in operation for the 31st year, is designed primariy for the boys' recrea-
tion, secondly, as a workshop in huinan behavior for University students.

*

I

HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
LONG ~
DISTANCE ~~~>;: *::4~~.~A
MOVING ~ ,'...~
..........................
4 ____________________ 4~.A.. >~V~
1273 Broadway

Phone Flint
Collect 4-1684
Interstater Rati

Flint, Michigan
is.

Stevens
Lit. '40
Mona gor

L IK E TH OU SA N DS O F A ME R ICA'S S TU DE NTS-
M A KE T HIS MIL DN ESS T EST YOU R SE LF A ND GE T
W H AT EV E RY SMOK ER WA NTS
PHOTOS TAKEN
CLA~ HAV
S~AN~O- '

I.

We own, operate and schedule our own fleet of vans
for direct service without transfer.

[I

P REVIEW...
'As the season for America's annual music festivals draws
near, and the programs and performing artists are announced,
many interested and concerned persons throughout the country
feel compelled, in 1951 as in former years, to raise their voices in
protest. The protest is, of course, not against the American
music festival as an institution, but rather against its failure to be
what it prhtends to be; it is a protest largely earnest, valid and
therefore justified.

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