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February 15, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-02-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARYk15, 1951

PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * I

I

Unknown Culprit Detroys
Sign ExtollingFraternities
A 50 square foot sign on the withstand the worst weather, ac-
diagonal extolling the virtues of cording to Cy Carlton, '52, IFC
fraternity life, was destroyed early publicity chairman.
yesterday morning.
yIMs ffrdays iscrimedHe termed the incident as "an
AIM officials disclaimed any obvious nefarious undertaking,
knowledge of the affair. the perpetrator of which is un-
The sign was erected Tuesday by known."
the IFC as a part of their publicity D
for rushing. David Belin, '51BAd, AIM ad-
* * * visor, commented "fraternity rush-
THE SIGN, which is valued at ing is the least of AIM's worries."
about $20, was constructed to aboutaithe ncident.ew nothing
Carlton claimed that the sign
SAerection took the combined efforts
uppiy o Art of three men for three days.
Bruce Sodee, '52, IFC rushing
Loan Prints chairman, said that the sign would
have attracted at least 25 new men
for rushing.
windles Fast The sign, which was to be dis-
played for another week, contained
The large crowd milling around pictures of fraternity life on cam-
the Art Print Loan Collection pus and was situated directly in
desk in the League Ballroom yes- front of the General Library. Sec-
terday would seem to indicate tions of it were found scattered,
that student interest in art is on about the Library's vicinity.
the upswing.
At 8 a.m. there were 150 stu- 11
dents waiting in line, and the 790. Generation Out
prints that were available soon
dwindled to 340. These framed On 'Wednesday
prints of reproductions of fam-oan
ous paintings are loaned to stu-
dents for one semester from the The second issue of "Genera-
art print loan collection at the tion," slated to hit campus next
rental fee of 50 cents. Wednesday, promises readers an
unusually interesting poetry sec-
tion comprised of contributions
"VAN GOGH and Cezanne are from students.
way ahead of Rembrandt and William Trousdale, Grad., has
Michelangelo in student prefer- written three poems for the spring
ence," Mrs. Vivian Perlis, direc- issue, and Barbara Stonecipher,
tor of the print library, said. '51, will also appear in this issue.
"While we're out of many of Song" and "Night Question."
"hee re oughtowmany'of Poems by Saul Gottlieb, '52, Co-
have a paditional 1o0 a aill Literary Editor, and Don Hope,
able from February 21 through '51 will also appear in this issue.
23able10frominebrua2troulgh,"Ed Vandenberg, Grad,, has con-
e at 510 Administration Bldg.," tributed a poem entitled "But
Can't Wait."
It was apparent that art ap-
preciation was only one among Prof. Poll k To
many reasons for the great de-
mand for prints. Lecture inC ad
"I was married recently and
the magazine cut-outs on my
bare walls kept falling, so I de- Prof. James K. Pollock, chair-
decided to try these. At least man of the political science dept.,
they'll stay in place," Carol'Prior, will lecture on the 'German Prob-
'51, said. lem' today and tomorrow at the
Canadian Defense College, King-
ston, Ontario.

Creal Calls
DentocrltS
Uninformed
City Council President Cecil 0.
Creal last night charged that his
Democratic opponents in the
spring election were apparently
uninformed when they proposed
their platform of reforms earlier
this week.
The platform, announced by
Lewis C. Reimann, candidate for
mayor, and Karl Karsian who will
oppose Republican Creal on the
April 2 ballot, in part called for
non-partisan city elections, a com-
plete revision of the city charter,
expansion of police and fire ser-
vices, payment by the University
for many municipal services it re-
ceives and a civic unity committee
to advise the mayor and the coun-
cil on community needs.
* * *
CREAL POINTED OUT that
many of these suggested reforms
are already being studied by coun-
cil members. "It does not seem that
the authors of the platform are
up to date on what the council is
doing."
He noted that partial charter
revision is under study now in
the council.
"It will take much study and
the final decision to revise the
document is up to the people. No
snap judgments are possible."
* * * '
CREAL SAID that there are al-
ready numerous social committees
"advising" the council, some of
which do not function well. He
doubted that another would help.
As for non-partisan elections,
Creal was strictly opposed to
them.
Reimann said last night, how-
ever, that the trend is toward such
elections. "Ann Arbor is the only
Michigan city with more than
12,000 inhabitants that still has
partisan elections."
The mayorality candidate term-
ed the city charter antiquated,
noting that it has never under-
gone a complete revision.
He said that a civic unity com-
mittee would give the local citi-
zens more of a voice in city gov-
ernment than they now have.

TALENT SHOW FORTHCOMING
Gulantics Review Tickets
Go On Sale Tomorrow
Tickets for the Gulantics reviewwill be presented at 8 p.m., Feb-
will go on sale tomorrow at Hill ruary 24, at Hill Auditorium.
Auditorium, according to Roy Among the scheduled acts will
Duff, '51, University Glee Club be dancers, singers, quartets, a
president . p d jazz combo and satires on, cam-
The Gulantics, sponsored by pus life to be presented by faculty
the Glee Club, Union and League, members.

i

Opera Society
Seeks Milado
Cast, Crew
There will be a meeting at 8
p.m. today in the League for all
those interested in working on
the Gilbert and Sullivan Society's
forthcoming production of The
Mikado.
The meeting is being held to
acquaint those attending with the
various aspects of work as a cast
or backstage-crew member, and
no actual part tryouts will be held
until a later date, according to
Nan Bylan, secretary of the So-
ciety.
* * *
THERE ARE openings for peo-
ple interested in costumes, make-
up, publicity, ushering, ticket
selling, solo. and chorus parts.
Students from any school in
the University are invited to at-
tend the initial meeting, Miss
Bylan said.
The operetta, Gilbert and Sul-
livan's most popular, will be pre-
sented late in May in Ann Arbor,
and will then be performed in De-
troit.
Technic Tryouts
To Be HeldToday
A tryout meeting for engineer-
ing students interested in joining
the staff of the Technic, oldest
engineering college magazine in
America, will be held at 7:15 p.m.
today in 205 W. Engineering An-
nex.
Scholastically eligible students
above first semester freshman
level are qualified to tryout.

r

A total of $175 in prizes will be
awarddd to the winners of the
talent show. These will be deter-
mined by an audience applause
meter.
Although the show itself isn't
scheduled to begin until 8 p.m.,
a complete program has been ar-
ranged for those who come early,
beginning at 7:30.
Songs by the Glee Club and
music by Ted Smith and his or-
chestra will be featured. Jay Mills;
'53, will interview spectators in a
'Hollywood reporter' type of pro-
gram.
The 13 acts finally selected for
the program were chosen during
a series of tryouts in which about
50 hopefuls participated.
In addition to box office sales,
tickets may also be purchased
from any Glee Club member.
ASP To Conduct
Panel On Peace
The local chapter of the Arts,
Sciences and Professions council
will hold a panel discussion on
"Approaches to Peace" at 8 p.m.
today in the League.
Recognition Pins
Are A Rushing
Necessity
Your gold Greek letters on your
coat lapel are a subtle means,
of keeping your fraternity name
before rushees. They are inex-
pensive and are stocked for im-
mediate delivery where your
u national regulations permit.
L. G. BALFOUR Co.
1319 S. University Ph. 3-1733 I
A, 2 f -

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