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May 06, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-06

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7

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAYS MAY 6, 7951

.

Loses

Again,

10 -

8

Wolverine Netmen Defeat
Outclassed Wisconsin, 8-I

4

lard Times Face 'M' Grid Machime

Hoosiers Stem Late Rally;
Michigan in Big Ten Cellar

* * *

, *

"-

BENNIE OOSTERBAAN
. . . slim pickings
* * $
over -the tall, Son-charging line-
men.
Once again ball-handling left a
lot to be desired. Fumbles were
frequent and scrambles were many,
but one provided the day's high-
light. Dick Strozewski, a 200 pound
tackle, grabbed one loose ball,
tucked it under his arm, and
chugged 60 yards around end for
a touchdown.
WHEN FUMBLES weren't hold-
ing things up, the running attack
functioned somewhat more effi-
ciently than last week. Fullbacks
Bob Hurley and Dick Balzhiser
bore 'the brunt of the ground as-
sault, aided by Bill Putich, Don
Oldham and Ted Kress.
Some of the ends did a little
running off the old end-around.
Bob Topp carried the mail sev-
eral times until he injured his
knee and was forced to retire for
the day. Thad Stanford utilized
the play to dash for pay-dirt
territory on one occasion.
One bit of news from University
hospital moade the picture seem a
little brighter. Norm Canty, fresh-

man tailback from Chicago who
was taken to the hospital Tuesday
with a head injury, was reportedn
to be recovering fast and will be I
able to play again.d
* * y
CANTY, who received a brainA
concussion last fall, was feared to
be sidelined permanently with thei
ailment, but the doctors state thatq
it is a new injury and should not
keep him out of football.
What could be called the first
string backfield, although it is
a trifle early for that, borders onf
the pygmy side. Bill Putich andc
Bob Hurley stand five feet ten,r
while the tow Don's, Oldham andt
ZanFagna, measure in at five
feet eight.
Although the four horsemen4
weren't much bigger, Wally Weber1
commented that the Humae So-
ciety will probably be around one{
of these days to complain aboutz
using such small boys.
* * *
Michigan Bowl
Vote Uncertain
ANN ARBOR -(I')-- Universityr
of Michigan is undecided about
endorsing renewal of the Rose
Bowl football pact between the
Big Ten and the Pacific Coast
conference.
Athletic Director Fritz Crislert
said a recent meeting of the Uni-
versity Board in Control of Ath-
letics came to no conclusion. As
a result, he said, Ralph Aigler,
Michigan's faculty representative
to the Western Conference will go
to the May 24-25-26 meetings in
Chicago uninstructed. The con-
ference decision will be made then.
The coast conference has ex-
pressed a desir to renew the pact
for three years with the Big Ten
sending its champion every year
as the PCC does.

Special to The Daily
BLOOMINGTON-Big Don

nitis, author of a 5-0 shutout over
the Wolverine diamond squad Fri-,
day, came through again in relief'
yesterday to squelch a last-ditch
Michigan rally and insure a 10-8
victory for Indiana, the loss be-
ing Michigan's 6th straight in Big
Ten play.
Colnitis fanned Leo Koceski
with two men on base to end the
ball game. Michigan had prev-
iously tallied twice in the last
frame to come within shouting
distance of the Hoosiers, but Col-
nitis came back to haunt them for
the second time in two days.
* * *
AS THE SCORE4 indicates, it
was not a pitchers day. Three
hurlers saw action for each side
with both starters, Duane Hege-
dorn of Michigan and Bert Weber
of Indiana leaving the scene in
the fifth inning.
It was the fifth that really
crippled Michigan hopes. They
entered the fatal frame leading
6-3, but when the smoke had
cleared they trailed by a tally.
Indiana third baseman Johnny
Kyle led off the fifth by walking.
Then after shortstop Gene Ring
was out, Ray Pegran singled to
center and the ball was booted by
Frank Howell to allow Kyle to go
to third and Pegran to reach sec-
ond.
* * *
FOLLOWING THIS, first base-
man Johnny Phillips came through
with a scratch single to load the
bases. Bruce Haynam, the Wol-
verine shortstop, then chipped in
with an error on Jim Platis' groun-
der to allow Kyle to score and
leave the bases loaded.
Catcher Don Luft then smack-
ed a single to left scoring Phil-
lips and Pegran, but Platis was
cut down trying to move to third
on the blow. Luft moved to third
with a stolen base and a wild
pitch and scored on Chuck Plat-
is' bounder through the infield.
In the sixth, Indiana added three
more runs and virtually iced the
ball game. Hits by center fielder
Harry Moore and Ring, accompan-
ied by two errors by Wolverine
catcher Linc Painter and one b3
Iaynam, brought in the runs.
COMPARED with their lethar-
gic performances at the plate Fri-
day, Coach Ray Fisher's charge:
* * *
Big eTen
Standings

Col-

were rather successful with the
lumber yesterday. They came
through with nine hits and eight
runs, with their most productive
inning being the four-run fourth.
Bill Den Houter, formerly
Fisher's number one relief hurler
started the game in right field
and led off the fourth with a
clean hit. Third baseman Gerry
Dorr beat out a bunt, moving
Den Houter over to second.
Howell, laying down a sacrifice
bunt was safe when the throw was
wide and the basesbwere full. Gil
Sabuco then dribbled an infield
ait and the attempted throw went
wide, allowing Den Houter and
Dorr to score and Howell to go to
third while Sabuco moved to sec-
ond. Haynam scored both run-
ners with a solid base hit.
BOX SCORE

By CY CARLTON
Michigan's tennis squad added
another notch to their rackets yes-
terday as they manhandled a weak
Wisconsin squad, 8-1, at Ferry
Field.
It was the fourth win in five
starts for the Wolverines this sea-
son and their 29th dual meet tri-
umph in 30 attempts over a four
year span.
SWEEPING all six singles and
two of the three doubles matches,
the Maize and Blue netters regis-
Rhubarb!'
CHICAGO - (R) -,- American
League President Will Harridge'
yesterday fined $100 each man-
agers Zack Taylor of the St.
Louis Browns and Bucky*Harris
of the Washington Senators for
tactics by their clubs in a rain-
threatened game at St. Louis
May 1.
Harridge said the Senators
were throwing the ball wildly
and stalling while the Browns
were "swinging at everything"
with St. Louis ahead, 5-0, and
at bat in the last of the fourth.
Rain was falling at the time.
If theSenators had batted in.,
the fifth, the game could have
been called at that point with
the Browns ahead for a St.
Louis win.
Subsequently, the rain abated
and the game went 13 innings
with Washington winning 9-8.
tered their most decisive win over
a Big Ten opponent this season.'
Captain Al Hetzeck started
the day right as he beat the
Badgers' Jim Deloye in straight
sets. Hetzeck was never pressed
and took less than an hour to
register the victory, with a pair
of 6-2 wins.
Bromberg was hard pressed in the

Badger Bob Reagen into the dust,
in less than 45 minutes, winning
6-0, 6-2. Curhan went to three
sets before besting Bill Grunow,
6-4, 1-6, 6-0.
Hetzeck-and Bromberg gave
the crowd a superb exhibition of
doubles play as they easily con-
quered Deloye and Ohm, 6-0,
6-4. The Badger pair never re-
covered from the first set shut-
out administered by the top Wol-
verine duo, who were at near
peak form.
Number two doubles saw the
only Wolverine loss of the day as
Schwartz and Smart fell to Rudeli-
us and Grunow, 7-5, 11-9, In a
close hard match.
* * *

k

MICHIGAN
Howell of
Haynam ss
Koceski If
Painter c
Palmer lb-
Weyg'ndt 1b
Dorr 3b
Denh'ter rf
Mogk 2b
Sebuco 2b
Hegedorn p
Stewart p
Carpenter
Totals
INDIANA
Platis C. 2b
Moore cf
Kyle 3b
Ring ss
Pegran If
Phillips lb
Platis, J.
Luft c
Weber p
Bower p
x Colnitis p
Totals

A R.
5 2
3 1
4 0
4 0
c4 1
b 2 0
3 2
2 1
2 0
3 1
2 0
1 0
p 1 0
36 8
AB R
b4 1
2 1
3 2
5 2
4 1
3 1
5 1
5 1
2 0
2 0
p0 0
35 10

4

1
0
1
1
3
1
J
0
a
9
1
I
1
2
0
2
1
1
0
11

PO
2
2
1
7
6
2
0
0
2
0
1
0
24
PO
1
1
t
0
2
10
1
11
0
0
1
27

A
0
3
0
1
0
0
3
0
1
2
2
0
-
12
A
4
0,
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
8

E
1
2
4
2
4
0
0
0
0
1
6
E
2
0
0
1
fl
0
1
0
5

STEVE BROMBERG
. . . four of five
. * *
second set but rallied to win his
match.
Jack Smart, the only southpaw
on the Michigan squad won 'the'
number three singles match
handily as he trounced Dons
Nagendank. Smart used a strong
overhead game for the second
straight day to register the win.
Hetzeck dropped the first game
of the match but won as he pleased
thereafter against a game but
wholly outclassed Deloye, whose
chief asset was his serve.
. * *
NUMBER TWO singles, saw
Steve Bromberg register another
easy win as he beat Ken Ohm,
again in straight sets, 6-1, 10-8.
Playing at the number four
singles slot, Mike Schwartz blasted
Bill Rudelius off the court, in the
-second set, to win 7-5, 6-3.
,* * *
THE TWO SOPHOMORES on
the Maize and Blue squad, Gene
Barreck and Bob Curhan won their
matches in the fifth and sixth
singles positions. Barreck pounded

CURHAN and Barreck bested
Reagan and Negendank in a 7-5,
6-2 runaway to capture the num-
ber three doubles match.
CountTurf
Wins Derby

If

.4

LOUISVILLE-(/P)-The great-
est crowd ever to witness a Ken-
tucky Derby yelled itself black in
the face yesterday as Count Turf, a
field horse was ridden to glory by
little Conn McCreary in the 77th.
running of the classic.
Never seriously considered in
pre-race predictions, the bay son
of Count Fleet, the '43 Derby win-
ner, took charge of things about
a quartgr-mile from home and; was
running right away from his 19
rivals when he went under the
wire.

Michigan..............100 410 002- 8
Indiana ..............011 143 00x-10

Buchanan Wins NAAU Trampoline Crown

1

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Special to The Daily
DETROIT - Florida State won
the National Amateur Athletic
Union Gymnastics Meet held here
yesterday but Ed Buchanan stole
the show in his specialty, the
trampoline event.
Buchanen addad the NAAU
crown to the NCAA title which
he won earlier in the year. Two
other Wolverines also placed in
the meet held at the Fairgrounds
Coliseum.
DUNCAN EARLEY finished fifth
in tumbling competition, and Stick
Davidson was seventh in the
trampoline event.
Florida State's Bill Roetzheim
walked off with individual hon-
ors as he won the All-Around ti-
tIe and tied for first place in
side-horse competition, and in
the high bar event.
In team competition, the Amer-
ican Turners of the Bronx finished
second behind Florida State, with
Southern California and Illinois
finishing 3-4.

Turning to individualsevents,
Gene Rabbit of Syracuse andl
Roetzheim tied in the side horse.,
In the parallel bars, Joe Kotys of
Kent State finished on top.
John Miles of Florida State cap-
tured thet title in the flying rings
and Dick Browning of Illinois won
the tumbling event.
On the long horse, Ed Scrobe of

the American Turners defeated all
opposition, and in calisthenics
competition, Al Harabedian out-
classed the field.
A total of 124 collegiate gym-
nasts participated in the meet
which was carried on through Fri-
day and Saturday. In addition to
men's collegiate competition, sev-
eral women's events were held
simultaneously.'

i

I

College Sports Scores

ROYAL MUSTANG came up fast
in the run down the stretch to
place second. Ruhe finished third i
and Phil D., another of the five
horses which composed the field,
was fourth. Not one of the favored
colts ever seriously figured in the
big scramble.
Count Turf; owned by J. .
Amiel, a New York City restaur-
ant owner, rewarded his backers
with a bulging $31.20 for every
$2 wagered on him.
Royal Mustang did even better,
paying off a whopping $53.00 for
the place. Ruhe paid back $7.80
for show. Everybody who bet on
any of the three was happy, and
you could hear them saying so #for ,
a long time after the stampede was
over.
* * *
THE VICTORY was worth
$98,050 to Amiel, the biggest pay-
off in the history of the tharee- z
year-old classic. McCreary, who
gave the winner a brilliant ride,
also scored on Calumet Farm's
Pensive in the 1944 Derby. He was
really sititng cozy as he brought ;
his mount down the stretch today.
The triumph marks the first
time that a grandfather, flater
and son have won the race. Reigh
Count, the daddy of Count;Fleet,
won it in 1928 from a record field
of 22 runners. The Count would
have been proud had, he watched
the third generation perform to-
day.
Never before, perhaps, did so
many "big" horses fall fiat on their
faces An the famous race while
their lesser-liked cousins proved A
themselves of Derby stature. Here
was the final order of the finish:
Count Turf, Royal Mustang,
Ruhe, Phil D., Fanfare, Battle
Morn, Anyoldtime, Pur Sang, Hall
of Fame, Timely Reward, Coun-
terpoint, Repetoire, King Clover,
Sonic, Sir Bee Bum, Snuzzle, a
Fighting Back, Big Stretch, Gol-
den Birch, and Mameluke.

TEAM W
Ohio State 4
Michigan State 2
Indiana 4
Illinois 4
Northwestern 4
Wisconsin 2
Iowa 2
Minnesota 2
Purdue 1
Michigan 0

L
1
0
1
2
2
3
4
4
3
6

Pet.
1.000
1.000
.800
.667
.667
.400
.333
.333
.250
.000

BASEBALL
Illinois Wesleyan 5, Notre
Dame 2
Ohio State 14, Purdue 4
Eastern Illinois 4, Illinois State
Normal 1
Missouri 7, Iowa State 3
Northwestern 4, Minnesota 3
Eastern Illinois 4, Illinois
State Normal 1
Georgia 6, Georgia Tech 4
Harvard 16, Army 5
Amherst 7, Massachusetts 1
Villanova 5, Fordham 2
Cornell 8, Brown 5
* * *

Yale 81, Princeton 59
Cornell 100, Penn 40
TENNIS
Navy 7, Cornell 2
Army 8, Columbia 1
Colgate 7, Syracuse 2
Illinois 5, Indiana 4
Kansas 6, Nebraska 1
Iowa 7, Northwestern 2
Johns Hopkins 7, Delaware 2
Maryland 5, Boston University
* *. *
GOLF
Northwestern 17, Notre Dame

4

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Omega's name is highly regarded in every
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Omega prices start at $60 for men's models,
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_r. . .

TRACK
Harvard 89, Dartmouth 51
Alabama 80, Tulane 46
Missouri 105, Notre Dame 26
Navy 82, Penn State 49
Southern California 94/
UCLA 36%/
Wyoming 71, Denver 60

13
Purdue 24, Indiana 3
Princeton 6, Navy 1
Iowa State 13 , Kansas State
412
Penn State 7, Gettysburg 0
Rochester 9, Hamilton 0
Colgate 6 , Syracuse 2Y2

.:e.

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