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May 03, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AFFILIATES SHARE TASKS:

'Wolverun'

.

Sand, Needles Fly at Exchange Party

* * *

* " *

* * *

By CRAWFORD YOUNG
A new kind of exchange "party"
was held yesterday by Alpha Epsi-
lon Pi fraternity and Alpha Delta
Pi sorority.
As their share in the festivities,
the AEPi's began the process of
cementing over the dirt basement
of the sorority house.
AND TO KEEP the celebration
going; nimble - fingered ADPi's
sewed busily on some drapes to fill
the bleak windows of the frater-
nity house.
The party got rolling at about
2:30 p.m. yesterday, as a few of
the men began straggling in
from their classes. Dress was
strictly informal.
The debauch increased in scope
as the day wore, on-by dinner-
time, 15 joy-mad AEPi's were rak-
ing sand on the basement floor,
readying the cellar for the appli-
cation of concrete later this week.
* 1' *
THE ACTUAL POURING of the
concrete will be done Tuesday,
the groups predicted.
The idea for the exchange
party, originated at the dinner
table of the AEPi house several
weeks ago, according to Conrad
Goode, '51, "social chairman."
Portia Pre~tle, '52, president of
the sorority, was a guest of the
fraternity and, noticing the cur-
tainless windows of the AEPi
house, suggested the afafir.
"Refreshments" for the party
were obtained on a strictly bus-
iness basis, Goode reported. ~,The
sorority purchased the sand and
cement and the fraternity bought
the material for the drapes.
SPRING FORMAL
RENTAL
* white dress jackets
* dress trousers
* studs and cuff links
* dress shirts
S WILD'S
State Street on the Campus

Derby Film
To Be Seen
Films showing construction of
soap box derby racers "from the
axle up" will be shown at 7:30
p.m. today in the Union for stu-
dents planning to enter the cam-
pus "Wolverun Derby" May 19.
Entrance blanks have been sent
to all housing groups, Jane Ell-
zey, '53, publicity chairman, an-
nounced. However, she empha-
sized, any individual or group of
individuals may enter by submit-
ting an entrance blank.
These may be picked up from
1 to 5 p.m. in the Student Offices
of the Union. An entrance fee of
$2 is payable when blanks are
turned in.
No limit has been set on the
number of cars a group may enter.
Women may not drive 'the cars,
but will be able to pick a male
driver to tak the wheel.
Other rules for the racing cars
are:
1. The cost of the racer; ex-
clusive of wheels and axles, may
not exceed $10.

NOT REALLY STUCK - This apparently abandoned derrick,
which is being stored behind a South Thayer hotel, has stimu-
lated campus rumors for years. Many people think it got trapped
behind the hotel after it was used in construction work there.
.4 4 .
Tale of 'Broken Down
Derrick Breaks Down

2.
than
long,

The racer may not be more
three feet high, nine feet
and 45 inches wide.

-Daily-Mike Scherer
EXCHANGE "PARTY"-A unique, presumably unrecognized "orgy," was held yesterday by Alpha
Delta Pi sorority and Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity. Three of the celebrators are shown above. Left to
right, they are Mibbs Lindquist, '53, Paul Graubard, '52, and Reuben Rosemberg, '51 BAd.

Glee Club Chiefs
Elected for '51-'52
These officers were elected to
Glee Club positions for 1951-52:
Philip Duey, of the music school,
director; Dick Frank, '53A, presi-
dent; Tom Sparrow, vice-presi-
dent; Bernard Jennet, '52E, secre-
tary; Jack Bay, treasurer, and
Merle Nelson, '52E, business man-
ager.

'U' Scientists Discover
Check for Polio Virus
n

3. The racer and driver toge-
ther may not weigh more than
350 pounds.
The derby is part of a gala out-
door "Tennis B a11 Weekend"
planned for May 18 and 19 by the
Union and the Women's Athletic
Association. Featured events, be-
sides the derby, will be the Tennis
Ball, a dance under the stars at
Palmer Field May 18, and an all-
campus Arb party May 19.
Spring Drama
Series Tickets
Will Be Sold

The real story of the derrick
which could get out if it wanted
to can now officially be told.
A rumor has been heard on
campus for the past three years
about a derrick which, after being
used in the construction of a ho-
tel on South Thayer, got trapped
behind the new building, unable
to get out.
* * '
THE RUMOR took on greater
strength, when students and
townspeople found the derrick in
the same spot whenever they jour-
neyed behind the building for one
reason or another. By now, many
students are sure the derrick is
really trapped back there.

People who always see it there
probably- only come during the
hours it's being stored. Or else
they'd know the derrick which
isn't supposed to be able to get
out, can.

IRead

Daily Classifieds

... ..
,, ._

,I

YOUR

l j

It

OFFICIAL
MICHIGAN
RING
IS HERE!

I,

.1

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
ACCURATE SIZING
COMPLIMENTARY ENGRAVING
Stocks are limited, so why not place a
small deposit on the ring of your choice.,
We'll hold it till you want it.w
Also available on special order with fraternity coats
of arms, encrusted Greek letters, or encrusted Block
"M". Six to eight weeks for delivery on these
special orders. Stop in and see them all at your
Balfour Store.
r -Tom and Meredith Suckling
L. G. BALFOUR Co.

The dread polio virus may even-
tually be stopped dead in its tracks
by recent discoveries of two Uni-
versity scientists.
Prof. Gordon Brown and Prof.
W. W. Ackerman, of the epidem-
iology department and virus lab-
'Mae's' Health
Not Reported,
EditorSays1
Newspaper stories of Gen. Doug-
las MacArthur's return to the
United States neglected to men-
tion liis poor health, Paul Swens-
son, managing editor of the Min-
neapolis Tribune, said yesterday.
"The genral's physical charac-
teristics were almost entirely over-
looked by the papers until his his-
toric speech to Congress," Swens-
son told journalism students.
Rumors Gen. MacArthur was
afflicted by palsy and was fail-
ing physically were overlooked by
reporters who covered his arrival
in San Francisco from his Tokyo
headquarters, the editor said.
Swensson stressed the import-
ance of telling readers how the
general walled down the plank
from his plane, the texture of his
skin, and whether he spoke like
a young man or an old one, after
more than 14 years abroad.
Swensson said because the Tri-
bune's eight man Washington
bureau failed to get the d-etails of
Gen. MacArthur's health he was
forced to send several reporters to
Chicago and Milwaukee, where the
general was speaking, to get the
desired information.
Guttman To Speak
Louis Guttman, scientific direc-
tor of the Israel Institute of Ap-
plied Social Research, will speak
on "Psychology Structure of So-
cial Attitudes" at 4:15 p.m. today
in Kellogg Auditorium.

oratory of the public health school,+
made it officially known yester-
day they have perfected a chem-
ical compound, ethionine, which'
will check virus growth in human
tissue.
- * -*
THIS IS the first time, the re-
searchers indicated, a chemical
has been found which will stop
the growth and multiplication of
polio virus in human tissue with-
out damaging that tissue.
"Ethionine," Prof. Brown ex-
plained, "stops the growth of
polio virus by interfering with
the complex chain of chemical
reactions that takes place with-
in tissue cells but not by acting
directly upon the virus."
This interference, he continued,
prevents the virus from getting
substances necessary for its
growth and multiplication.
* * *
PROF. BROWN, however, point-
ed out the research results will
have no immediate application in
treatment of polio infection until
further extensive tests with ethio-
nine and similar compounds have,
~been made on animals.
"Ethionine in doses large
enough to stop virus growth in
the human body, in contrast to
a laboratory culture of human
tissue, would probably produce
undesirable results," he asserted.
But, he intimated, the new
technique of growing polio virus
in cultures of human tissue "opens
the door" to a research approach
that may possibly lead to finding
a chemical which can be safely
employed in the fight against polio
infection.
The research reported by Prof.
Brown and Prof. Ackerman is
part of a large polio project
conducted in the University
Virus Laboratory under the su-
pervision of Prof. Thomas Fran-
cis, chairman of the epidemiol-
ogy department -of the public
health school.
The project is being sponsored
by grants from the National
Foundation for Infantile Paraly-
sis.

'

Season tickets for the coming1
Ann Arbor Drama Season, whicht
will begin May 15, will go on sale
at 10 a.m. tomorrow in the Lydia
Mendelssohn theatre box office.-
Mail orders for season tickets
for the five-play series are still
being accepted but tickets for in-
dividual performances will not beK
put on sale until May 10.
The season will open with an
early George Bernard Shaw play,
"Captain Brassbound's Conver-
sion," May 15 to 19, and will con-
tinue with two recent New York
hits, "Rirg Around the Moon,"
May 22 to 26, and "Cocktail Party"
May 29 to June 2.
"Mary Rose," June 5 to 9 and
"Royal Family," June 12 too 16,
will close the Season, which has a
large bumber of stars, including
Ruth Hussey, Edna Best, Henry
Daniell and Lucile Watson..
All plays open Tuesdays and run
through Saturdays, with matinees
on Thursdays and Saturdays.
To Be Held Today
Harold James, of the United
States Geological Survey, will
speak at 4 p.m. today in Rm. 2054
Natural Science Building.
James's topic will be "Evolution
of the Iron Formation Lithologies
in the Lake Superior Region:
Problems in Sedimentation and
Metamorphism."
He is now working in Michigan's
Upper Peninsula on a resurvey of
the iron district.
e

"Anyone who wants to can
plainly see," the hotel's desk
clerk said, "the iachine is nar-
rower than the driveway and the
derrick is not broken down. In
fact, it's in excellent operating
condition."
* *
HOW COME it's in such good
shape? Because it's used!
Onlythree months ago the
construction 'company which
owns the piece of machinery
used it in some local construc-
tion work. They brought a
truck in and towed the derrick
off.
The reason it always seems to
be there, the clerk pointed out, is
the construction company likes to
store it there. It's safe from small
boys who might take some pieces
from it. The aparatus is valued
at between seven and eight-thou-
sand dollars.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

Well, it isn't.

Many items are crested

Ladies' wallets
Key cases
Picture albums

I ,

T

1319 S. University

Phone 3-1733

1b11' 1Z

I

Li
~~

......

JI

d ,

TUSSYSPECIAL SALE

/9
MER COLOG'NES

FROM THE RECENT

Aye, it's fine wor-r
Tfur such a low pr-r-r
THRIFTY STUDENT BUNDLE.

LONG-PLAYING RECORDS

i

i

MOZART: THE IMPRESSARIO
Comic Opera in One Act (in German).

SPLP 532
5.95

WEBER: CLARINET CONCERTI, No. 1 and No. 2 SPLP 529
Heine, Clarinet & Salzburg Mozarteum Orchestra 5.95

I.

SUM

SCHUBERT: SONATA IN B FLAT
Wilhelm Kempff, piano

London 307
5.95
London 327
4.95

ALL CLOTHING LAUNDERED, FLUFF DRIED, AND NEATLY FOLDED.
4 POUNDS MINIMUM . . . . . 50c
EACH ADDITIONAL POUND . .. .. 12c
HANDKERCHIEFS, each additional . .3
SOCKS, pair, each additional . . . .3
SHIRTS, each additional . . . . . . . 17c

Regular $2 size now

FAURE: VIOLIN SONATA IN A-MAJOR
Lola Bobesco, violin; Jacques Genty, piano

I

plus tax

DVORAK: QUINTET NO. 3 FOR Sl
Rrnn'et Ounrtet & Katimsvi

Col. ML 2173
4.00

!1n

riolo

f

ii

I u ,Ire U

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