100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 29, 1951 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

0

Tigers Down

White Sox,

7-4;
Lead

Braves, Indians

Take

,.
-- :,

S* *

4

Baseball's Big Six
By The Associated Press
LEADING BATSMEN

Yankees Beat Nats, 6-4
Giants Drop 1 0th in Row

Player and Club G AB R H
Busby, White Sox 9 36 8 17
Easter, Indians 8 26 3 11
Fox, White Sox 9 31 813
Adcock, Reds 10 39 7 16
Robinson, Dodgers 1145 11 18
Elliott, Braves 11 38 7 15

Pct.
.472
.423
.419
.410
.400
.395

RUNS BATTED IN
National League American League
Robinson, D'dgs 13 Zarilla, W. Sox 12
Patko, Cubs 11 Noren, Senators 11
Jethroe, Braves 10 Dimaggio, Yank 10
Cooper, Braves 10
HOME RUNS
National League American League
Jethroe, Braves 5 Williams, R. Sex 3
Hodges, Dodgers 5 Robinson, W Sox 3
Pafko, Cubs 4 Zarilla, W. Sex 3
* * *

By The Associated Press
DETROIT - Outfielder Hoot
Evers of the Detroit Tigers ended
his batting slump yesterday with
a mighty home run and two singles
to help the Tigers halt the Chi-
cago White Sox, 7-4.
Evers, who had only one bingle
in six earlier games, slammed a
400-foot homer to start the Detroit
scoring off Billy Pierce, Chicago
pitcher who lost his first game af-
ter two wins.
* * *
IT WAS the second straight win
for the Tigers and their third in
* * *

S,

TED PAPES
... new Sports Editor
State Eleven Drills
EAST LANSING -(A))- Biggie'
Munn's Michigan State football
forces wound up their fourth week
of spring practice yesterday by
sweating through two hours of
gruelling scrimmage in Macklin
Stadium.
The first and second offensive
and defensive units took turns go-
ing through their paces under sim-
ulated game conditions with lines-
men marking off the yardage.
* * *
THE FIRST STRING offensive
backfield had Al Dorow at quarter-
back, Don Mcauliffe at left half,
Vince Pisano at right half and
Wayne Benson at fullback.
This quartet scored in half a
dozen plays against a second team
defense

JIM PARKER GEORGE FLINT
...new Associate Sports Editors

TEAM LACKS LET TERMEN:
Spring Practice She
By JOHN JENKS ing the ball w
Spring football tried hard to dropped back to c
shift into high gear yesterday af-
ternoon on South Ferry Field, but driverypthe Bidd
an unimpressive performance on with center W
forced it to stay in low speed. and guard Bob 1V
With only three weeks of prac- bulwarked the cen
tice remaining on the agenda, the line, with the resu
gridders have a long way to go to earned every inch]
round into shape, acording to gained at all.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan. * *
QUARTERBACK
"WE'RE FAR BEHIND the sche- Fagna, who lookedg
dule set by past teams," comment- hurt his leg early in
ed the mentor as his offensive and Bill Putich spe
d, the m ent , d n ternating with Skip
squad, the Blues, made painful directing the Blue w
progress against the defensive Red ,
eleven. FOR MANY PEO
In years past the Blue mem. been expecting Coa
bers ran roughshod over their to shift Putich fro
Red brothers, but yesterday the to the tailback post,
reverse was true. This could be major source of disa
attributed to the lack of letter-
men out for spring ball and to
the Improved playing personnel M jo
of the Red contingent.
At any rate, Blue passers were AMERICAN L
consistently man-handled by the W L
on-charging Red line and Blue Cleveland 7 1
backs made few long runs in the Washington 7 ,
two hour scrimmage. New York 7 4
# . * Boston 6 4
OCCASIONALLY little Wes Chicago 5 4
Bradford would squirt through a Detroits 2
hole for a short gain or Russ Ros- St. Louis 6
corla would skirt end for a few Philadelphia 1 11
yards, but play was characterized GAMES T(
by huge pile-ups on the line of Washington at
scrimmage and mad scrambles for Kuzava (2-0) vs Li
the many fumbles caused by loose Chicagoat Detro
ball-handling in the Blue back- (-)v ehue
field. (0-0) vs Newhouse
Boston at Phil
Although fullback Dick Bal- Scarborough (1-0
zhiser looked good completing (0=1) vs Shantz (0
several left-handed jump passes, nek (1-1).
Ted Kress, Norm Canty, Skip Cleveland at S
Stuhldreher and Bill Putich, the Garcia (1-0) and
other throwers for the Blues, vs Garver (1-1)a
h'ad tough times avoiding eat- (0-1) or Overmire

ws Weak Offense

seven 1951 starts.
A crowd of 11,640 sitting in
79-degree weather watched
rookie Joe Ginsberg of the Tigers
homer into the right field stands
in the third inning. It was his
second in the majors, both com-
ing in the last two games.
Saul Rogovin, who relieved start-
er Ted Gray in the fifth, was
credited with the win. Rogovin al-
lowed only one run and 2 hits.
George Kell, Detroit's hard-hit-
ting third baseman, got into the
lineup for the first time this sea-
son. Kell, shelved by a broken
finger, singled once and played er-
rorless ball.
s* *
YANKEES 6, SENATORS 4
NEW YORK - Tom Morgan,
rookie righthander, cooled off the
torrid Washington Senators yes-
terda,. He pitched the New York
Yankees to a 6-4 victory over
Bucky Harris' ambitious crew.
Morgan, in posting his first vic-
tory, gave up eight hits in outlast-
ing Al Sima, who defeated the
Yanks in Washington last week.
The Senators, winners of seven of
their last eight games, were
knocked from the league lead as
Cleveland swamped St. Louis, 12-4.
* * *4
INDIANS 12, BROWNS 4
ST. LOUIS -Dale Mitchell pro-
vided the big punch with a bases-
loaded homer in the fourth inning
as the Cleveland Indians walloped
the St. Louis Browns 12 to 4 yes-
terday.
Bob Kennedy and Lary Doby
also hit four-baggers in the attack.
The Browns scored the first run
of the game when Bob Young
tripled in the opening frame and
crossed the plate when Bobby Avila
fumbled Jim Delsing's grounder.
RED SOX 4, ATHLETICS 2
PHILADELPHIA-Home runs
by Lou Boudreau and Dom Dimag-
gio gave pouthpaw Charley
"Chuck" Stobbs the margin he.
needed yesterday as the Boston
Red Sox defeated the Philadelphia
Athletics, 4 to 2-the A's ninth suc-
cessive defeat.
Philadelphia had the tying runs
on base in the ninth but Stobbs
got Eddie Joost on an outfield fly
to end the game and give him his
second pitching victory of the sea-
son.
BRAVES 3, PHILLIES 0
BOSTON - Righthander Max
Surkont won his third complete
game of the new season yesterday
as the Boston Braves blanked the
Philadelphia Phillies, 3-0, for their
third decision in four starts
against the national league cham-
pions. It also was the Tribesmen's
fifth straight triumph.
DODGERS 8, GIANTS 4
BROOKLYN - The Brooklyn
Dodgers continued to make life
miserable for the New York Giants
yesterday, beating their arch rivals,
8-4, to extend the Polo Grounders'
losing streak to ten games.
* * *
CUBS 8, CARDS 2
CHICAGO-The Chicago Cubs
defeated the St. Louis Cardinals,
8 to 2, yesterday, but lost the ser-
vices of shortstop Roy Smalley for
at least four weeks.
Smalley suffered a broken left
ankle when he stumbled while slid-
ing into third base in the fifth inn-
ing of the game.
* *~ *
REDS 4, PIRATES 2
PITTSBURGH - Two relief
pitchers staved off the Pittsburgh
Pirates in the ninth yesterday toj
give Cincinnati's Herman Wehmei-
er his firt win of the season as the
Reds beat the Bucs 4-2 before al
crowd of 10,657.

Artists Will
Arrive Soon
For Festival
Many noted musicians will ar-
rive in Ann Arbor this week for
appearances in the 58th Annual
May Festival, scheduled for Thurs-
day, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
Thor Johnson, guest conductor,
has already arrived to direct the
final rehearsals of the Choral Un-
ion, which has been trained by
Lester McCoy, associate conduc-
tor of the University Musical So-
ciety.
UNTIL THE Philadelphia Or-
chestra arrives Thursday the Uni-
versity Musical Society Orchestra
will augment the efforts of the
chorus in rehearsal.
A stand-in quartet of local
soloists-Rose Jun, Gloria Go-
nan, Reid Shelton and Paul
Hines-will work with the Chor-
al Unin instead of the regular
Festival performer.
The Philadelphia Orchestra
with its complement of more than
100 musicians and Conductor Eu-
gene Ormandy will arrive Thurs-
day morning.
JOHNSON WILL conduct a re-
hearsal Thursday of the regular
soloists, Eileen Farrell, Blanche
Thebom, Coloman de Pataky, and
Oscar Natzka, the Choral Union
and the Philadelphia Orchestra.
Tossy Spivakovsky will arrive
in Ann Arbor Thursday morn-
ing. Rise Stevens will arrive that
afternoon and William Kapell
and Patrice Munsel will come in
Friday. All will have rehearsed
in advance in Philadelphia.
Ticket information may be ob-
tained by calling the University
Musical Society, whose office is
located in Burton Memorial Tow-
er.
Many, Varied
Scholarships
Available at 'U'
Graduate and undergraduate
students who want scholarships
ranging from $400 a year to an
award of room, board and tuition
at a university in New York City,
may make application for them
at 1059 Administration Building.
Scholarships offered by the New
York Institute for the Education
of the Blind are designed for grad-
uate students who wish to enter
the field of the education of han-
dicapped children. Candidates will
be required to spend a maximum
of 20 hours per week teaching in
the New York institute. The ap-
plication deadline is Tuesday.
Four $400 a year scholarships
to be used at any university have
also been made available by the
Detroit Armenian Women's Club.
The scholarships will be given to
men and women of Armenian par-
entage in the Detroit area on the
basis of scholastic ability and
character.
Candidates must be undergrad-
uates with at least one year of
college work. Application for the
Armenian scholarships must be
made by May 15.
All scholarships are open to men
and women.
New Field Course
Offered inGeology
Students may inspect the geo-
logy of the Upper Peninsula and
the northern Lower Peninsula in

a new field course to be offered
this summer.
The program will include a
week's study of elementary geo-
logy followed by field trips to col-
lect fossils, make rock and min-
eral collections and observe bed-
rock and surface geology.
Those interested may contact
Prof. James Zumberge, of the geo-
logy department, who will be in
charge of the program.

henever they
huck a pass.
urley started to
e he met head-
ayne Melchiori
Matheson, who
ter of the Red
alt that Hurley
he gained, if he
*
Don Zan-
good last week,
the scrinnage,
ent the day al-
Stuhldreher in
attack.
OPLE who had
.ch Oosterbaan
am quarterback
this came as a
appointment.

The only shifting of position
to date has been the moving of
Dave. Tinkham from fullback to
wingback. Norm Canty, alleged-
ley a quarterback, has been run-
ning from tailback, but the
switch was made in freshman
ball.
As Oosterbaaj looks to more
and more men to fil ever-increas-
ing gaps, a greater number of
changes can be expected.
* * * t
DICK STROZEWSKI, the big
tackle from South Benr, Indiana,
spent a portion of the afternoon in
practice kicking extra points and
field goals. So far he and Russ
Roscorla are the only candidates
for Harry Allis' job.
Odds and ends... Of the seventy
or so candidates our for spring
ball, only eight are lettermen.

League Standings

LEAGUE

G
1
2
4
4
4
4
8
1

Pet.
.875
.778
.636
.600
.556
.429
.200
.083

GB
11/2
2
2
3 /2
6
8

NATIONAL LEAGUE

W L
Boston 9 4
Brooklyn 7 4
St. Louis 5 3
Chicago 5 4
Philadelphia 6 5
Pittsburgh 4 5
Cincinnati 4 6
New York 2 11,
* * *

Pct.
.692
.636
.625
.556
.545
.444
.400
.154

GB
1R
112
2
2
3
3
7

)DAY
New York-
opat (2-0).
it--Holcombe
r (0-1).
adelphia (2)
) and Taylor
-2) and Kell-
t. Louis (2)
Wynn (2-0)
and Widmar
(0-1).

GAMES TODAY
Philadelphia at Boston (2),
Thompson (1-0) and Miller (1-
0) vs. Bickford (2-1) and Dono-
van (1-0).'
New York at Brooklyn-Jan-
sen (1-2) vs. Erksine (0-2).
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (2)
Raffensberger (0-2) and Rams-
dell (0-2) or Fok (1-0) vs Queen
(0-1) and Law (1-0).
St. Louis at Chicago-Bre-
cheen (1-0) vs. Hiller (2-0).

( ,_ ._.

I -

ACCURACY - BEAUTY "
OMEGA
AUTOMATIC
The thinnest self-winding watch in
the world... made with all the pre-
cision that has won for Omega the
world's most coveted prizes for
accuracy. The slightest movement of
your Wrist keeps it working perfectly.
Shock-resistant and anti-magnetic,

CON VNI4ENCE /6
~0.~~ ,

ENSI4N
DONST

IS INI\
DELAY

SlAY

I

R
) i yy
.. _

/

18K gold applied figure dial.
Gold-filled case, $71.50,
With Sweep Second j

t " r {
:v .
''
. ; ;a Cy
. r 2 F L 1.IY1 .

f)

t ,r A

III

11

11

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan