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April 28, 1951 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-w -M 11 . . 1 - 1 . . - - .

t

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRiL."8,1951

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Set Foreign
Policy Now,
JudgeSays
"We must set a definite strong
foreign policy and follow it with
resolution," Judge John J. Parker
told guests at the 23rd annual
Founder's Day dinner last night.
Parker, who is senior judge of
the United States Circuit of Ap-
peals, stated in a speech entitled
"The Defense of Freedom" that
the main pillars of our foreign
policy should be Uniyersal Military
Training, the Atlantic Pact and
the United Nations,
RESOLVED ON t h e s e three
things, we must put an end to
politics at the water's edge, Park-
er said. "Nobody will follow us if
we allow the impression to get
abroad that we ourselves do not
know where we are going."
"It is therefore time to end
the great debate," Parker said,
"Napoleon was right when he
stated that 'Wars have been won
by good generals; wars have
been won by bad generals; but
no war ever yet was won by a
debating society,"'
Parker, who served as alternate
judge at the Nuremberg trials and
was an advisor to General McCloy
on Germany, stressed the import-
ance of Europe and the Ruhr to
our defense.
We shall not be able to make
an effective stand without them,

'U' To Show
Music Story
On TVHour
The ,story of a student musical
composition will be presented on
the University's Television Hour
over WWJ-TV at 1 p.m. tomor-
row.
Profs, Ross Lee Finney and Gil-
bert Ross of the School of Music
will demonstrate the polishing
and rehearsing given a composi-
tion and the work carried on with
student composers.
The demonstration will feature
a student composition which will
be played by a student string
quartet.
The history of Japan will be the
subject of Telecourse 4, "Lands
and Peoples of the Far Fast" as
led by John Hall of the history
department.
The second lesson on Telecourse
6, "Retailing and the Customer,
will emphasize buying,
IT'S PICNIC TIME
s"

4:

.:

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
IT'S LIKE THIS-Pitch man from an aeronautical company reveals intricacies of turbo-jet, ram-
jet and reciprocating airplane engines to intent visitors at the engineering college's open house. The
college's biennial welcome to the campus and the piblic will continue from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today
with displays in and around East and West Engineering buildings, Randall physics laboratory, the
Rifle Range Building and North Hall. On exhibit will be a tank, model ships and automobiles as
well as all the facilities of the college.

L

Shortage of 2,000 Michigan
Teachers Seen for Next Year

he stated.
* * *
IN THE 25 YEARS since he was
appointed by President Coolidge,
Parker has come to the conclusion
that the United States must take
the initiative in organizing a
world order based on law. "If
through selfishiness, or cowardice
or lack of vision we fail, the lead-
ership of the world should pass
to Russia, then liberty will be but
a memory," Parker asserted,
Parker felt that if we had taken
the advice of President Roosevelt
and General Marshall and pro-
vided universal military service in
1945, we would not be in our pres-
ent dangerous position. The first
duty of leadership is strength,
Parker said.
Dorm Surplus
Used for Bonds
(Continued from Page 1)
Total regular bond retirement
(known as "debt service") now
amounts to approximately $565,000
yearly, not including bonds on
University Terrace apartments.
This sum eats up approximately
one-fifth o fthe fees paid by stu-
dents who live in University
dorms,
Next year, a 1950 bond issue for
the South Quadrangle will fall due
for the first time, and the regular
"debt service" will increase 'by
some $147,000, (This is the
amount due on this issue in 1952;
every year thereafter the figure
will be $172,500), Debt service in-
cludes both principal and interest.
THE FOLLOWING table repre-
sents a breakdown on present day
total bond obligations, all of which
are scheduled to be met out of
"debt service." Because interest
makes a complicated variation
from year to year, it is not includ-
ed in these figures.
The bonds are to be retired from
revenues from all dorms, and not
just those dorms financed by the
specific issues.
1946 ISSUE - $5,000,300. Retirement'
period: 21 years. Includes West Quad,
Mosher Jordan, Stockweil all. Out-
standing Jan. 1, 1951: $3,779,1000.
1950 (First Issue) $5,700,000. Retire-
ment period: 30 years. Includes East
Quad, Alice Lloyd, Victor Vaughn,
South Quadrangle. Outstanding Jan. 1,
1951: $5,600,000.
1950 (Second issue) $3,300,000. Retire-
ment period: 30 years. South Quadran-
gle. (Estimated cost of South Quad is
$5,638,000, part of which is included in
first issue, 1950). Outstanding Jan, 1,
1951: $3,300,000.

4.

Michigan schools will need 2,000
more new elementary teachers
next year than will graduate from
the state's colleges, according to
T. Luther Purdom, director of the
University's Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
Speaking at the annual confer-
ence on Teacher Supply, Demand
and Placement, Purdom quoted a
survey of the state's colleges,
showing that approximately 5,000
new teachers will be hired in
Michigan schools next year.
Purdom also said that some
states, particularly California, Illi-
nois and New Jersey are "raiding"
ENGINEERS*
Receiving bachelors
graduate degrees
in
AERONAUTICAL
MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL
Investigate
Career Opportunity
That May Be Available
For You in
Aerodynamics as applied to the
aircraft propulsion means.
Experimental stress analysis.
Development of electro-
mechanical parts.
Experimental test engineering.
THE PROPELLER DIVISION
CURTISS-WRIGHT CORP.
CALDWELL, NEW JERSEY
Location: On New Jersey High-
way No. 6 adjacentto the
Caldwell-Wright Airport.

Michigan schools for teachers be-
cause their salary scales are high-1
er, "In general," he added, "the
average inexperienced teacher in
Michigan can expect to receive
$2,800 next year, though many of
the larger schools have a starting
rate between $2,900 and $3,100.

MEXICO
THIS SUMMER
For an amazingly inexpensive
and pnjoyable summer vaca-
tion with courses in arts, crafts
and Spanish in Mexico's most
beautiful colonial town, plus
colorful weekend field trips,
write for illustrated prospectus
V to: Stirling Dickinson, Insti-
tuto Allende, San Miguel Al-
lende, Gto., Mexico.

A

Get your BEER at
CAPITOL MARKET

/

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Distance Plant is from:
Caldwell 4
Montclair 6
Newark, NJ Airport 23
New York City 25
Philadelphia 112
Pittsburgh 525
Ann Arbor 650

miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill at Tappan Street
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
9:30 A.M.: Church School-College Age Class.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (nursery for chil-
dren). Sermon: "New Gods for Old."
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Jean Goree Bradley, Associate
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 supper at the Congrega-
tional Church, State & William Sts., followed
by a talk by Prof. Theodore Newcomb of the
University sociology department on th etopic,
"Are Wars Inevitable?"
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M. ' Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-"Probation after Death."
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading rbom is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Cl ristian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
Ths room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Fridays 7-9
P. M., Saturday 3-5 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
504 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Crystal Cuthbert, Assistant Student Counselor
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, "Economic Order."
6:00 P.M. Roger Williams Guild meeting. Sup-
per, discussion, and election of officers.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State & Williams
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr D.D.
Student Ministry: Rev. H. L. Pickerill;
Mrs. George Bradley
Director of Music: Wayne Dunlap
Organist: Howard R. Chase
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
10:45 A.M.: Church Service. Dr. Parr's sermon
will be "The Promises Men Live By." /
Student Guild at 6:00 in the assembly room of
this church. Prof. Theodore Newcomb will
talk on the question "Are Wars Inevitable?"
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin..
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11 -00 A..- Sundanmrnngsrvice.

To investigate:
1. Send Letter giving in detail
personal data, academic
course, military status, ex-
tra-curricular activities, ca-
reer interest, etc.
2. Forward letter to:
J. William Long
Administrative Engineer
Curtiss-Wright Corporation
Propeller Division
Caldwell, New Jersey'

LUTHERAN, STUDENT ASSOCIATION
STUDENT CENTER
(National Lutheran Council)'
1304 Hill Street
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Services in Zion & Trinity Churches.
5:00 P.M.: Meet at Zion Lutheran Parish Hall
rto leave for an outdoor meeting at Riverside
Park.
Wednesday-
4:00 P.M.: Tea and Coffee Hour at the Center.
Thursday-
7:25-7:50 A.M.: Devotions at the Center.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "The Church Worships Her Lord."
Sunday at 4:45: Bible Study-Continuation of
study of the Epistle to the Ephesins.
Sunday at 5:30: Gamm~a Delta, Lutheran Student,
Club, Supper-Program. Report: of Delegates to
Regional Gamma Delta Convention in Cleve-
land.
Tuesday at 9:15: Social Hour.
Thursday at 9:00 P.M.: Ascension Day Vesper.
Service.
THE VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center Chapel
Willow Run
Reverend Blaise Levai, Pastor
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Sermon "Searching
For A Kingdom."
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
4:30 P.M.: Study and Discussion Group.
Leader-Mrs. Bedford Watkins.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
The Episcopal Student Foundation
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu.
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).
10:00 A.M.: Junior High Class.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev,
Henry Lewis.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.'
5:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.
5:45 P.M.: Canterbury Club Buffet Supper and
Program,
6:00 P.M.: High School Club (Lofberg residence
1607 Granger Avenue).
7:00 P.M.: Rector's Class.
Tuesday, (St. Philip and St. James) 7:00 A.M.:
Holy Communion.
Wednesday, 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast).
Thursday, (Ascension Day) 7':00 A.M.: Holy
Communion.
Friday, 7:00 A.M. and 12:10 P.M.: Holy Com-
munion; 4:00 to 6:00 P.M.: Open House,
Canterbury House.

FRIENDS MEETING

I.

* .I

Lane HaltLbrary

11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.

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(NEXT: What happensj
obligations are not met?)

when bond

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We want
to educate

you!

For your own safety and conven-
ience, take a lesson from us. Learn

to use Traveler's Checks.

They are

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