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April 25, 1951 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-25

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t

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1951

Requirement
Discussed at
Conference
(Continued from Page 1)
PROF. ALBERT Marckwardt of
the English department added
that the word liberal should be
emphasized in liberal education.
"We should free students, he
said, from the naive conceptions
they possess about the world we
live in."
One student claimed that those
who don't like foreign languages
won't get anything out of it. "It's
torture," he said, "I can get what
I want of a foreign culture from
the newspapers."
ANOTHER STUDENT complaint
was that it would overload the
student with credit requirements.
In answer to this, Prof.'
Charles Staubach of the ro-
mance language department,
pointed to a poll of this years
senior class that showed that
72% of them had taken more
'foreign language courses than
the present one-year require-
ment demands.

9 t

Chief Denies
Inefficiency
Of Firemen
By VERNON EMERSON
Fire chief Ben Zahn yesterday
denied charges that Ann Arbor's
fire department improperly han-
dled a $60,000 blaze in a Wash-
tenaw Ave. home Sunday.
Several spectators at the fire
claimed that firemen were unor-
ganized, underequipped, and did
not use the best methods possible
to control the fire.
"THESE PEOPLE just don't
know the facts," Chief Zahn said.
"Even the largest and best
equipped departments can't get
control of basement fires such as
this one.',
. He pointed out that his men had
a hard time spotting the main
blaze, which roared from the bot-
tom of the house to the top inside
thick walls, until it reached the
roof.
"We didn't lack anything. We
did everything that could be
done-it just wasn't enough."
One witness, Carl Bryant, '51A,
said that when he got to the fire
a little after it started, he thought
it would be put out.
* * * *
MALCOLM OCHS, '53,.charged
that the fire fighters did not make
use ofhall of the equipment they
could have.
Miss Adda Sherwood, an occu-
pant in the dwelling, said that
firemen made no attempt to save
personal belongings in the house.
But insurance adjustor Walter
Burrows said that as far as his
company is concerned the fire de-
partment did everything possible
to save the building, "There are
always a lot of curbside firemen at

1 9
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/9 NQ

..Another student comment was
that the new requirement would
turn students' against language
courses, so they would take them
just to pass, rather than to broad-'
en their educational scope.
-On one point there was univer-
sfl Agreement, that the second
year of language courses should'
be revised to make them more
fseful and more intellectual,
Deferments
or Definite
Says Hershey
(Continued from Page 1)
~e urging all students to take the
titude exam regardless of scho-
astic standing.
* * *
D)EPUTY DIRECTOR Brig. Gen.
ioUis H. Renfrow has warned that
2tough the exam is not mandatory
now, it may be made an essential
aprt of deferment at a later date.
In that event, he said, the
raft board which has no test
core for a student will have to
_prder his induction.
At present draft boards may base
de4erment on either the test score
4a on scholastic standing.
THE IMPORTANCE of taking
le test was further stressed when
t University official predicted that
the students' class standing will
*ot be determined until late June
or possibly early July.
Before the standings can be
; etermined, the semester's final
rades will have to be averaged
and charted. The process is ex-
pected to take several weeks.
he University will announce at
alater date how, when and
vhere the class standings may be
obtained.
0 Applications for the aptitude
4*am, however, are now available
t all local draft boards and at the
tniversity's Armed Services In-
trmation Center, Rm. 555 Ad-
inistration Building. The Ann
bar draft board is located at 208
!. Washington.
According to the Educational
Testing Service which is in charge
qf the exam, registrants will be no-
tified of the date and place of
examination approximately two
'eeks after they mail their appli-
4ations.
(Tomorrow-Aptitude Exam In-
structions)
24
1217 Prospect Street
For Delivery
Call 7171

v 4 t}{
?vi
FRONTLINE HUMOR-Some GI, remembering those shaving
cream signs back home, put up these on poles along a highway
in Korea. In order they are: Disagree with Harry-If you want
to get back--If you don't think it's true-Ask poor ole Mac!
DEVIL DOMINATES:
Arts Theatre To Present
JamesIBridie Fantasy

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIEDADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
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Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
ROOMS FOR RENT
DESIRABLE SINGLES & DOUBLES-
Gradtuate or business women. Very
good location. Ph. 2-5232. )44R
ATTRACTIVE double front. New furni-
ture, 1106 Lincoln. Phone 5224. )47R
LARGE SINGLE - Gas heat, shower,
automatic hot water, student land-
lord. Phone 3-1791 after 6. )33R
ROOMS FOR MALE STUDENTS-One
double and one single near Law Club
and Bus. Ad. School. Continuous
hot water, showers. 808 Oakland.
Ph. 22858. )12R
CAMPUSTourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower, Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )1R
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Manuscripts, theses, etc. Call
Lois Spaide, 2-0795 or 2-7460. )20B
VIOLA STEIN -- Experienced typist.
Legal, master's, doctor's dissertations;
foreign manuscripts, etc. New Elec-
tromat typewriter. 513 E. William. Ph.
2-9848. )2B
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office Equipment Serv-
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typewriters. ,6B
SQUARE DANCING IS FUN
If you are planning a party, why not
have a square dance? Call Wayne
Kuhns, 2-9326 for further information.
)17B
KIDDIE KARE
RELIABLE SITTERS available. Phone
3-1121. )10B
TYPEWRITERS and FOUNTAIN PENS.
Sales, rentals and service. Morrill's,
314 S. State St. )4B
TYPING WANTED-To do in my home.
830 S. Main, 7590. )19B
FrCNMA

PERSONAL
ALL PEOPLE who have participated in
STUDENT PLAYERS productions this
year are invited to an organizational
meeting at the Union at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday. )26P
SENIOR P.L.C.s-Going to Quantico this
summer? Contact Merv Ezray 2-4410.
)34P
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
122 E. Liberty - Phone 8161 )2P
RAY HATCH will patch that match.
Learn to dance with
RAY HATCH DANCE STUDIO
209 S. State - Phone 8083 )4P
HELP WANTED
YOUNG MEN AND UNDERGRADS 17-22
to assist circulation mgr. Must be
neat, courteous and ambitious. Aver-
age earnings 65.00 per week. Trans-
portation paid. Permanent work. To
leave immediately. See Mr. Hollins-
head, Employment Service, 111 Felch
St., 10 a.m.-12 noon Friday. )$7H
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE June or September for
fraternity or annex, 6 pleasant rooms,
2 baths. Church St. Or could lease
10-room, 3-bath house. Phone 6876
eve. )17F
MEN'S SINGLE--One block from Rack-
ham, 120 N. Ingalls, Ph. 2-6644. )18F
LOST AND FOUND
MAN'S WEDDING RING-White gold.
Inscribed "M.B.W. to T.S.L." Call
3-0807. )56L
LOST - Juvenia wrist watch. Broken
cordovan band. Reward. Call Herb,
321 Adams House, 2-4401. )55L
FOUND-Schaeffer pen near A.H. Call
DExter 4241 after 5:30. )57L
LOST-All white pet cat. A.A. High
area. Call 2-8870. )54L
Read Daily Classifieds

A

LOST AND FOUND
LOST IN ANGELL HALL-Parker 51 pen,
maroon & silver. Please call or re-
turn to Administration Bldg. lost &
found. Reward. Phone 2547 Alice Lloyd
3-1561. )45L
LOST-Will the HONEST PERSON who
found a brown leather billfold yes-
terday please call Lee. Ph. 9201.
FOUND-1 Schaeffer Lifetime in A.H.
Call 3-0459. )53L.
FOR SALE
1940 FORD-2-door, good tires, cheap
transportation, high mileage. $150.
Jim Corson, Ph. 2-9874. )57
TENOR BANJO - Excellent buy, $50.
Jim Corson, 907 Lincoln, 2-9874. )57
SCHWINN CONTINENTAL at half price.
Phone Jack after 7 p.m., 8146. )56
KODAK-Retina I. New, with case and
original boxes, etc. 3.5 XENAR lens.
Cost $83.00. Owner will sell for $55.00.
Ph. 9233, Room 4. )55
PARAKEETS, canaries and zebra finch-
es; bird supplies and cages. Reason-
able. 562 S. Seventh. Ph. 5330. )2
MEN'S GOLF CLUBS - Joe Kirkwood
matched set. 4 irons, 2 woods. Never
been used. $30.95. Ph. 2-8692. )50
GOING ON A CRUISE WITH THE
NAVY? U.S. Navy-type oxfords $6.88.
Navy T-shirts 49c, white shorts 69c,
black hose, anklet or long 39c, laun-
dry bags 69c. Open until 6 p.m. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. )5
J. H. COUSILNS
ON STATE STREET
SHORT SLEEVED SWEATERS
Magic blend of NYLON & VICARA.
The wonders of science bring to you
a blend of coal and corn in a magic
thread of cashmere-like feel. $3.95.
)3
EVERGREENS-Offering Univ. person-
nel home-grown evergreens at whole-
sale. See Michael Lee, 1208 Chem.
Bldg. mornings or tel. 8574 mornings.

FURNISHED APARTMENT - For sum-
mer for 2 sttudeijts, near Law School.
Call Goodman or Wepman 3-4145. )}W

We Are
Authorized Dealers
of Webster-Electric
Ekotape
High Quality
Take Recorders
RECORDING STUDIO
521 EAST LIBERTY
Phone 2-3053

t ,
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TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Ride to and from Detroit,
daily. Arrive in Detroit approximately
8:00 to 8:30 a.m., leave between 5 and
6 p.m. Will accept part time ride or
ride for one way only if hours differ.
Weekdays call 3-1511 ext. 2611. Eve-
nlings & weekends call 3-8600. )23T.
WANTED TO BUY
WARDROBE TRUNK - Phone 2-9218
evenings or Sunday. )13X

WANTED TO RENT

By DAVIS CRIPPEN '
The stage of the Arts Theatre
Club will go to the Devil Friday
night:
The occasion is the opening of
the late James Bridie's "Mister
Bolfry," in which Hell's master
plays an important role.
THE COMEDY fantasy is set in
the rectory of a Presbyterian
minister in a remote part of Scot-
No Difference
In Views on
AtomnShown
People who live near atomic
energy plants have no more know-
ledge, fear or interest in man's
newest force than residents of
areas where there are no atomic
plants, according to a study made
by the Survey Research Center.
A study of public response to
peacetime uses of atomic energy
was conducted by the Center in
August of 1950 under a research
grant from the United States
Atomic Energy Commission.
* * s
RESULTS OF THE study indi-
cate that people in both installa-
tion and non-installation areas
are generally aware of atomic en-
ergy but have little understanding
of it.
In both groups, researchers
found that about one in a hun-
dred people had not heard of
the A-bomb, and that only six
in a hundred knew of no other
uses for atomic energy.
The over-all findings of the
study show few differences in peo-
ple's reactions to atomic energy
regardless of whether they live in
an installation area or not.
They merely indicate that some-
what fewer people in areas near
atomic energy activities are con-
cerned with potential dangers, and
that somewhat more are perhaps
bored with the subject of atomic+
energy, the Center study reported.
Bayly To Continue
Religious Lectures
"Are Jesus' Teachings Rele-
vant?" will be the topic of the
third University Christian Mission
lecture scheduled for 7:30 p.m. to-
day in Kellogg Auditorium.
The speaker will be Joseph T.
Bayly, eastern regional secretary
of, the Inter-Varsity Fellowship.
Bayly will also be available for
personal consultation from 1:30 tol
3:30 p.m. today in the League con-X
ference room.

land. Living with the cleric is
his niece, who is opposed to every-
thing her uncle believes in. This
is where the Devil enters.
The niece, to put her uncle in
a different position, calls up Sa-
tan. But much to the embarass-
ment of both niece and uncle, it
soon turns out that the Devil is
on the side of the minister. The
rest of the play is devoted to re-
solving the difficulties.
Bridie and his work are little
known in this country, but accord-
ing to club member Strowan Rob-
ertson, who is directing the -up-
coming play, the Scotchman was
one of England's leading play-
wrights until his death early this
year.
Robertson said that as far as
he knew this will be the first
American performance for the
play.
The presentation of the Bridie
work represents a change from
the play originally scheduled by
the club for this period. The first
American presentation of "Mar-
tine," by Jean Jacque Bernard,
was set tobe the group's fifth pro-
duction. However, red tape pre-
vented this, Robertson said,
"First we had to write to France
to get permission to do the play.
After we'd done that, we didn't
have time to write the play's
translator in England and still get
things going on time," Robertson
declared.

4

something
said.

like that anyway," he

May Festival
Will Present
Noted Artists
More than a dozen prominent
performers of the music world will
appear in a series of six concerts
when the annual May Festival
gets underway May 3, 4, 5 and 6.
Included in the Festival will be
nine noted soloists, four conductors
and two choral groups. In addition,
the Philadelphia Orchestra will
perform at all concerts.
Among the soloists will be
such well-known artists as Artur
Rubinstein, William Kapell, Rise
Stevens, Tossy Spivakovsky and
Oscar Natzka. Other famous
soloists will include Blance The-
bom, Patrice Munsel, Eileen Far-
rell and Coloman de Pataky.
Thor Johnson will direct the
Choral Union, in two concerts,
and the Festival Youth Chorus,
led by Marguerite Hood, will also
make an appearance.

ON THE SHORE OF LAKE MICHIGAN
The OLD TRAIL INN
HARBOR SPRINGS, MICHIGAN
A Moder% Inn on the shore of beautiful Lake Michigan
with the hospitality, atmosphere, cuisine and friendliness
of an Old Fashioned Inn
Attractive Guest Cottages - American Plan
A distinctly Family Resort
HONEYMOONERS WELCOME
Please write: Phone 785 WI
THE OLD TRAIL INN HARBOR SPRINGS

ENGINEERS
Receiving bachelors
& graduate degrees
in
AERONAUTICAL
MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL
I nvestigate
Career Opportunity
That May Be Available
For You in
Aerodynamics as applied to the
aircraft propulsion means.
Experimental stress analysis.
Development of electro-
mechanical parts.
Experimental test engineering.
THE PROPELLER DIVISION
CURTISS-WRIGHT CORP.
CALDWELL, NEW JERSEY

A ,

I I toction: On New Jersey High
-I way No.6 adjacent to the
- CcIdwell-Wright Airport.

FI

." bom

updomoodmad

"

ASKS TECHNICAL AID:
U.S. Can't Supply World with
Enough Food, Darby Asserts

starring
ROBERT
MONTGOMERY

S.L. CINEMA GUILD
and the Congregational, Disciples, Evangelical,
and Reform Guilds
present
"GREEN
FOR DANGER
... a mystery featuring the zaniest great
detective in film history, ALSTAIR SIM
with LEO GENK and TREVOR HOWARD.

Distance Plant is from:
Caldwell 4
Montclair 6
Newark, NJ Airport 23
New York City 25
Philadelphia 112
Pittsburgh 525
Ann Arbor 650

To
1.

investigate:
Send Letter giving in detail
personal data, academic
course, military status, ex-
tra-curricular activities, ca-
reer interest, etc.

miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles

I

:A

2. Forward letter to:
J. William Long
Administrative Engineer
Curtiss-Wright Corporation
Propeller Division
Caldwell, New Jersey

F

It is impossible for Americans to
raise enough food to feed the rest
of the world at our level of con-
sumption, Prof. William J. Darby
of Vanderbilt University said in a
speech here.
While Prof. Darby felt that
America should help provide food
in emergencies, he declared that
our greatest contribution should be
machines, tools and information.
"This will allow these underde-
veloped areas to raise themselves to
the level of which they are cap-
able," he explained.
PROF. DARBY, professor of bio-
Faculty Panel Will
Discuss Education
UNESCO and the Union will co-
sponsor a panel discussion on
"What Kind of Education Do We
Really Need for Peace?" at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow in the Union.
Dean Hayward Keniston of the
literary college will act as modera-
tor for the discussion. The panel
members will be Prof. Robert An-
gell of the sociology department,
Prof. Kenneth Boulding of the
economics department and Prof.
Samuel Eldersveld of the political
science department.

chemistry and nutrition, visited
many of the undeveloped areas of
the world last year. He said that 46
per cent of the world's non-Com-
munist population live in these
areas.
"In Asia, home of famines,
there is still gross starvation. It
is almost impossible for us to
understand the threat of famine
which stalks these people," Prof.
Darby continued.
Describing the primitive camel-
drawn water-wheel - "the Egyp-
tian version of our TVA" -- the
squallor of the adobe huts and the
"human beasts of burden," Prof.
Darby emphasized the problems of
water, sanitation, and transporta-
tion in these areas.
He also mentioned lack of re-
frigeration and processed foods,
"the piling up of villages" and
shocking illiteracy, as factors
which add to the plight of peo-
ple throughout Latin America,
Africa, and Asia.
"Industrialization, improved
farming, sanitation, and transpor-
tation, are the only solution to
this problem," the professor em-
phasized.

We have brought back this film which
played in Ann Arbor last year in answer to
many requests. --S. L. Cinema Guild

f

Architectural Auditorium
50c

Friday and Saturday
7:30-9:30

WEEKDAYS
44c TO 5 P.M.
Continuousfrom 1 P.M.
Last Times Today

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--

ra...rO.

A. TODAY!

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Starts Thursday
MAGNIFICENT
ADVENYURE
M...m an Empire Aflane!

a

-n

_. -

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
presents
A 1-Act Playbill
cuttings from
"KING HENRY V" by Shakespeare
"PRIVATE LIVES" by Noel Coward
"LADIES IN RETIREMENT" by Percy & Denham

j

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4

CoI., by
SUPER-CINECOLOR

.o

A CHEESE
SANDWICH

I't s
o IEn
IItOIiT

A.

1111

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F I I A ir~i' ~

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