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April 21, 1951 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1951-04-21

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r'

I THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 1951

______________________ U I

...........

and Pupils.
Vill Invade
J Campus
pproximately 6,000 high school
icians will flood the campus
iy when the Michigan School
d and Orchestra Festival gets
der way.
n annual affair since 1939, the
ival is sponsored by the Michi-
School Band and Orchestra
ciation. Current chairman of
Association is Prof. William
,elli, of the music school.
* * *
&RTICIPATING in the Festi-
will be 102 high-school and
or-high-school bands and 20
iestras.
'he students taking part are
st-division winners in the dis-
ct contests which have been
Ld during the year through-
the state.
[usic sessions will be held
>ughout today, beginning at 8
Hill Auditorium, Pattengill
itorium, University H i g h
poo1 and Slauson Junior High
001 will be used.
HE EXPECTED overflow will
accommodated by Michigan
te Normal College in Ypsilanti.
Music racks, podiums and oth-
*necessary equipment have
en rounded up by 120 Uni-
sity bandsmen. The bands-
n will also act as stage man-
ers, messengers,. secretaries
A sponsors for the Festival.
ach student band or orchestra
be required to play a warm-up,
optional and a selected number.
playing will be judged on a
-category basis by appointed
mittees.
usic Festival
o Be ,Given
'he annual all-state Massed Or-
stra Festival under the auspices
the music school will be pre--
ted at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in
. Auditorium.
ne-hundred-ninety instrumen-
sts from 20 adult civic orches-
s in Michigan will perform.
elections for the program,
ch will be highlighted by Beet-
en's Eighth Symphony, have
n rehearsed separately by the
iestras. The only assembly and
earsal of the program by the'
ssed personnel will be just be-
e the concert.

Year-Round Sailors

-Daily-Ed Kozma
HARDY TARS-It takes more than rain, fierce winds, freezing temperatures or ten inches of ice to
keep members of the Michigan Sailing Club from knifing across their home-waters at Whitmore
Lake.,They sail conventionally from early spring to December, when they switch to ice boats. But
most of them admit that they enjoy it more in T shirts than in parkas.

IT'S STILL THE ARMY:
Recruiting Methods Timeless,
18th Century Comedy Shows

Recruiting methods haven't
changed much in 240 years.
At least that was the opinion of
two present-day recruiting ser-
geants after they saw the Arts
Theatre Club's production of
George Farquhar's "Recruiting
Officer." The restoration comedy
tells of the attempts of a British
officer of the early 18th century
to beg, trick or persuade men into
the British army.
* * *
THE TWO sergeants, tempor-
arily turned critics, were William
Long of the Air Force and Nor-
wood Boadway of the Army, both
of whom are attached to Ann Ar-
bor's Army-Air Force recruiting
station.
They declared that though
outwardly recruiting may have
changed a great deal since 1707
when the play was written,
fundamentally it was still "the
same old rat-race," as Sgt. Long
put it.
"Of course," Sgt. Boadway said,
"we don't Shanghai them like they
do in the play. There's no hitting
a recruit over the head and drag-
ging him away today."
* * S
"WELL, NOT exactly," Sgt. Long

qualified. "We're a little more sub-
tle now." But the Air Force ser-
geant declined to elaborate on this
statement. "Everybody's got their
trade secrets," he said evasively.
Both men agreed that the
"Old Buddy System" employed
often and effectively, by the
play's hero Captain Plume was
still widely used. "Make a guy
feel like he's your long lost bro-
ther and you've got him almost
every time," Sgt. Boadway said,
evidently not as worried about
his trade secrets as Sgt. Long. .
"But there is one new gimmick
in recruiting though that they
didn't have when this play was
written," Sgt. Boadway contin-
ued, "Those letters from the
President, which start out 'Greet-
ings'."

Theatre Club'
To Lengthen
Present Run
The Arts Theatre Club produc-
tion of "Recruiting Officer" will
be given an additional perform-
ance at 8 p.m. Monday, club Busi-
ness Manager Hy Berman, '53L,
announced yesterday.
Originally scheduled to close to-
morrow, the play by George Far-
quhar is being held over because
of a heavy demand for reserva-
tions to see the production.
If .there is sufficient demand,
Berman said, there might be a
second additional performance
scheduled for Tuesday. The deci-
sion on this will be made today,
he said.
In making the announcement,
the business manager noted reser-
vations for performances at 8:30
p.m. today and tomorrow are ex-
hausted.

More Booths
Planned for
SL Election
The Student Legislature has an-
nounced plans to employ a record
number of voting booths in next
week's all-campus election.
Also approximately 300 more
volunteers are needed to man
these booths if this added con-
venience to voters is to be fully
realized.
* * *
SL PLANS call for a total of
1,080 man hours to handle the
voting. If each volunteer works at
the booths for the one-hour min-
imum 1,080 volunteers will be
needed.
So far, Alice Spero, '53, legis-
lator In charge of voting booth
personnel, reports there have
been approximately 700 volun-
teers.
Students may vounteer to work
any time from 9 am. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday or Wednesday by phoning
the SL Building at 34732, Miss
Spero said.
* *' *
SL IS AIMING to make this
election turnout the biggest.
"There are 16,560 students en-
rolled in the University and we
won't be satisfied until every one
of them has voted," George Rou-
mell,'SL president, said.
"But we are realistically
shooting for a 60 to 70 per cent
turnout Tuesday and Wednes-
day.
"We are placing special empha-
sis on getting the graduate stu-
dents out to vote this time. They
form a major portion of the stu-
dent body and almost invariably
fail to participate in elections,"
Roumell pointed out.
NSA Meeting
To Be Held
Gerge Roumell, president of
the Student Legislature, will wel-
come approximately 100 delegates
to the Michigan Student Govern-
ment Clinic at its opening session
at 11 a.m. today in the Union.
Sponsored by the Michigan
Region of the National Student
Association, the initial session
will also feature addresses by Dean
of Students Erich Walter and
Prof. Algo Henderson, of the edu-
cation school and former presi-
dent of Antioch College.
Thirteen state colleges and uni-
versities will be represented at the
two-day conference which will
deal with all areas of student gov-
ernment. Discussion group meet-
ings will begin at 1 p.m.
Student Legislator Leonard Wil-
cox, '51, will preside at the clinic
banquet at 6:30 p.m. today, at
which Prof. Edgar Waugh, of Mi-
chigan' State Normal College, will
speak.
The work of the clinic will be
concluded with two sessions to-
morrow: discussion group meet-
ings in the morning and the final
general assembly in the afternoon.
'Finian' Matinee
To ShowToday
A matinee performance of "Fin-
ian's Rainbow" will be held at
2:30 p.m. today in Lydia-Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
Tickets priced at 74 and 90
cents will be available at the wuA
office at 2 p.m. today, according
to Burt Sapowitch, '51, producer.
Tonight's performance is sold out.

Two Ball--Corner Pocket Committee
s WillCollect
For Phoenix
A special gifts committee of 100
persons will be enlisted by the
Phoe ix Project to collect $1,000,-
000 in special donations from
alumni before the drive closes on
Commencement Day.
The drive to date has netted
$3,875,000. More than $2,200,000
is needed to fulfill the $6,000,000
goal.
ACCORDING TO the national
Phoenix Project Headquarters,
$1,500,000 will be solicited from
corporations, and the rest by the
special gifts committee.
Fifty alumni have already
agreed to serve on the commit-
tee and the rest are expected to
accept within the next week.
They will each have a $10,000
- quota to fill.
The coast to coast committee
-Daily-Malcolm Shatz will be under the direction of
CUE EXPERTS-World pocket billiard champion Willie Mosconi George W. Mason, '13, president
watches intently as finalist in the national collegiate pocket of Nash-Kelvinator, and Chair-
billiard championship Leroy Kinman, makes a tricky shot. man of the Special Gifts Commit-
_____________________________________________________tee.
The national headquarters hopes
Engine Open House Scheduled that the remainder of the needed
amount will be made up of small
gifts from alumni who have not
Military and commercial exhi- yet been contacted. More than
bits will be featured in the engi- sity students and faculty, will be been cntace ore thn
neering college's open house to be guided through the departments ,000 gifts have already been.re-
held Friday and Saturday in the of the college. Engineering stu- ceived at national headquarters,
college and Yost Field House. dents who wish to serve as guides and 5,000 more are hoped for be-
ll C ( llTL d E tfore Commencement.

x

a.

Navy, Coast Guard and Army
displays will take their place
among the civilian demonstrations
shown every two years.
Engineers, high school students
and the public, as well as Univer-

may cal arrou iee y, i, at
38517.
Friday's Technic will contain
articles on the major displays
and will be sold in the Engineer-
ing Arch.

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick .results

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109 New Phi Bete Members
Initiated at Annual Ceremony
____ __1_4

Y FESTIVAL

Philadelphia Orchestra at all Concerts

I

THURSDAY, MAY 3, 8:30-ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Pianist;
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. Toccata and Fugue in D minor
(Bach-Ormandy); Piano Concerto No. 2 (Chopin); Symphonie
fantastique (Berlioz).
FRIDAY, MAY 4,.8:30-EILEEN FARRELL, Soprano; BLANCHE
THEBOM, Contralto; COLOMAN de PATAKY, Tenor; OSCAR
NATZKA, Bass; UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION; THOR JOHNSON,
Conductor-in VERDI'S "Requiem Mass."
SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2:30-TossY SPIVAKOVSKY, Violinist;
ALEXANDER HILSBERG, Conductor. FESTIVAL YOUTH CHORUS,
MARGUERITE HOOD, Conductor. Overture to "Manfred" (Schu-
mann); American Folk Songs, orchestrated by DOROTHY JAMES;
Rhapsodie espagnole (Ravel);. Violin Concerto in D minor
(Sibelius).
SATURDAY, MAY 5, 8:30-RIsE STEVENS, Mezzo-Soprano;
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. Suite for Strings, Op. 5 (Cor-
elli); "Che Faro senza Euridice" from Orfeo ed Euridice
(Gluck); "Voi che sapete" from Marriage of Figaro (Mozart);
"Il est doux" from Hirodiade (Massenet). Symphony No. I
(Shostakovich); Die Moldau (Smetana); Air de ha from
L'Enfant Prodigue (Debusy); Habanera, and Seguidilla from
Carmen; Polka and Fugue from Schwanda (Weinberger).

(Continued from Page 1)
Earlier yesterday, 109 students
were initiated into the nation's old-
est greek letter society.
New members include the follow-
ing: .
LITERARY COLLEGE JUN-
IORS follow: Herbert Boothroyd,
Russell Church, James Clark, Ray-
mond Lewkowicz, Constance New-
man, Edward Poindexter, Gladys
Quale, Garry Schott, Joan Strief-
ling, Arthur Waltz, and Nancy
Watkins.
SENIORS: Elizabeth Ainslie,
Isaac Akita, Maureen Anderson,
Lloyd Appell, Robert Atkins, Ro-
bert Backus, Thelma Batten, Da-
vid Belin, John Beljan, Warren
Benedict, William Berridge, Jr.
Henry Boldt, William Bren-
ton, Joyce Briskman, Juanita
Brown, Barbara Buslepp, Norma
Chud, James Degnan, James
Faircloth, David Fox, Doris
Gardner, Jerome Goldman,
ENGINEERS
Receiving bachelors
& graduate degrees
in
AERONAUTICAL
MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL
Investigate
Career Opportunity
That May Be Available
For You in
Aerodynamics as applied to the
aircraft propulsion means.
Experimental stress analysis.
Development of electro-
mechanical parts.
Experimental test engineering.
THE PROPELLER DIVISION
CURTISS-WRIGHT CORP.
CALDWELL, NEW JERSEY
Location: On New Jersey High-
way No. 6 adjacent to the
Caldwell-Wright Airport.

Henry Green, Charles
Lita Hagen,- Conrad
Barbara Jans, Carolyn
Alan Kidston.

Gwinn,
Heyner,
Kaplan,

Esther Kleitman, Jerome Knit-
tie, William Kopp; Bernard Kow-
alski, Lawrence Krause, Marvin
Labes, Esther Laden, Berton Lon-
don, William Matheson, Richard
Matsch, Charles Mays, James Mc-
Reynolds, Shirley Miller, Louise
Moore, Harold Niemeyer.
Nancy Notnagel, William Par-
shall, Carl Pohly, Elizabeth Ross,
Marshall Sahlins, Alice Shannon,
David' Shappiro, Bruce, Stewart,
Kenneth Veenstra, Harvey Wei-
ner, Arvin Wells, Edmund Whale,
Richard. Whipple, Susan Wilcox,
and Joan Williams.
* * *
GRADUATES OF FEBRUARY:
Avraham Amith, Riva Genfan, Lo-
is Irwin, Roger Lull, and David
Vance.
Graduates of August and June,
1950: Alphonso Brown, Francis
Crowley, Roger Dettmer, 'Rose
Deutsch, John Finger, Irwin
Goffman, Eugene Gordon, John
Huntley, Virginia Moore, Frank
Richardson, Bernard Sivak, Jo-
anne Stoller, Mary Walsh, Sher-
win Wine, and Jack Wirth.
School of Education: Margaret
Hodges, Mary Hook, Yvonne John-
son, and Ruth Frank.
School of Music: Mary Bailey,
James Berry, Jr., Robert Cogan,
Arthur KatterJohn, Norman
Rost, Jesse Sander on, Carlo
Cartaino, Gertrure Hauenstein,
Thomas Gligoroff, and Graham
Young.
Graduate School: Richard Cut-
ler, Betty Fladeland, Samuel
Pratt, John Riordan, Jr., and Mar-
ian Winterbottoln.

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.4

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill at Tappan Street
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
9:30 A.M.: Church School. College Age Class.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (nursery for chil-
dren). Sermon: Four student speakers on the
topic "Major Decisions of Youth."
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Jean Garee Bradley, AssocIate
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 supper at the Congrega-
tional Church, State & William. Guest speakers
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Banks of Flanner House,
Indianapolis.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-"Doctrine of Atonement.",
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
Ths room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Fridays 7-9
P. M., Saturday 3-5 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
504 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Crystal Cuthbert, Assistant Student Counsel
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, "Kingdom of God."
6:00 P.M.: Cost supper and evening program at
the Guild House. Dr. Julius Fischbach of Lan-
sing, "Five Successful Careers in One Life-
time."
8:00 P.M.: Party for-Foreign Protestant Students
at the Church.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State & Williams
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr D.D.
Student Ministry: Rev. H. L. Pickerill;
Mrs. George Bradley
Director of Music: Wayne Dunlap
Organist: Howard P. Chase
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
10:45 A.M.: Church Service. Dr. Parr will speak
on "Removing the Old Landmarks."
The Student Guild will meet at the church at 6:00
for supper and meeting. Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Banks from Flanner House, Indianapolis will
speak.

FRIENDS MEETING

Lane Hall Lbrary

BEER is what YOU need
on Picnics
Get it at
CAPITOL MARKET

11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
STUDENT CENTER
(National Lutheran Council)
1304 Hill Street
Dr. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Student Center.
10:30 A.M.: Services in Zion and Trinity Churches.
5:30 P.M.: L.S.A. Supper Meeting in Zion Parish
Hall-Program at 7:00. The Rev. Harry Wolf
will speak on "The Lutheran Church & Its
Inter-Mission Program in Detroit."
Wednesday--
4:00 P.M.: Teo and Coffee Hour at the Center.
Thursday-
7.25-7:50 A.M.: Devotions at the Center.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, "How Salvation is
Obtained."
Sunday at 4:45: Bible Study; Study of Ephesians
continues.
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta Supper-Program.
Discussion, "How Wrong Is Gambling?"
Tuesday at 9:00: Social Hour.
THE VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center Chapel
SWillow Run
Reverend Blaise Levai, Pastor
Sunday, April 22nd, 1951
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship.
Sermon-"The -Art of Compassion."
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
4:30 P.M.: Study and Discussion Group.
Leader-Mrs. Bedford Watkins.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Dr.
Lemon "This Shaken World."
.5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild Supper Hour.
Meeting at 6:30 P.M. Rev. John Bathgate waIl
speak on "Turning the World Upside Down."
Installation of Officers.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
' 10:00 A.M.: Adult Group--"Probing the Ideas of
a Unitarian"-Dr. Alvin Zander, Chairman.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship: "Unitarian Needs
and Attitudes Today"-Sermon by Edward M.
Redman based on series of Adult Group dis-
cussions.
12:15 P.M.: Fellowship Dinner-Reservations by
phone 2-0085.
1:00 P.M.: Special Meeting of the Congregation.
3:00 P.M.: Unitarian High School Group.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
The Episcopal Student Foundation
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
O490O A M . Hlv Communion (followed by Stu-

-c
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i

r TICKETS

I

A limited number of tickets for several of the concerts, mostly in
the $1.80 section, are available and will continue on sale so long
as the suppy lasts.

1
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SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2;:30-WTLLIAM KAPELL, Pianist; OSCAR
NATZKA, Bass; UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION; THOR JOHNSON,
Conductor. Overture, "Fingal's Cave" (Mendelssohn); "Sum-
mer's Last Will and Testament" (Lambert); Piano Concerto
No. 3 (Prokofieff).
SUNDAY, MAY 6, 8:30-PATRICE MUNSEL, Soprano; EUGENE
ORMANDY, Conductor. Overture, Euryanthe (Weber); "Chacun
1 t " n Tn -tff - V ni hn R,0;.:01t frfn:7 ..il . n n

We carrya full line of
KOSHER DELICATESSEN

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verdu in.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.

~

SALAMI

CORNED BEEF PASTRAMER

Distance Plant is from
CaIdwell 4
Montclair '6
Newark, NJ Airport 23
New York City 25
Philadelphia 112

miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
--

WEINERS SMOKED FISH
FRESH DAILY
RRFAD RAGFI-S R _OLLS

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.

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