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April 19, 1951 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T.. R_ ..,, . ----,- ,-P ..,.

+ THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

..T. .T.. - MT.CTT..Ta1aa vaN Das TY a s s.a..

r ei xr. a

Titan Golfers ip

' in ome Debut, 15-

12

Veteran Olson Shoots 73
As Sophs Show Promise.

RESCHEDULING DIFFICULT:
& A -2 Weather Factor in Conference Baseball

By BOB ROSENMAN
The University of Detroit Titans
spoiled Michigan's home golfing
debut yesterday as they squeezed
past a sophomore-laden squad of
Wolverines, 15-12, over the Uni-
versity links.
Coach Bert Katzenmeyer had
three sophomores and two juniors
in the linup for Michigan. One of
the sophs had never played a round
of golf in college competition, and
none had ever competed over the
University's' course in a competi-
tive match.
BOB OLSON, who shot a fine
one-over par 73, was the only vet-
eran who saw action as Katzen-
meyer sought to determine who
would fill the open berths on the
squad. Three Wolverine veterans,
Dick Evans, Dean Lind, and John
Fraser, took the day off as the
"rookies" went through their paces.
The overall score, 15-12, is not
too important; poor golfing
weather, lack of adequate prac-
tice plus the earliness of the sea-
son affected the scores of both
teams.
What is significant, however, is
the scores recorded by the Michi-
gan sophs and juniors.
* * *
SOPHOMORE Lowell LeClair,
under the pressure of competition
over the difficult layout of the
University course, shot a good two-
over par 74. His putting and short
game was especially sharp.

a
Jim Dixon, who competed in a
few meets for Michigan last
year, shot a' 77, while Jack
Stumpfig, another soph, fired a
78 in his first match for Michi-'
gan.
Hugh Wright, another second-
year man, carded an 80 and War-
ren Gast had an 84 for the Wol-
verines.
PLAYING IN the first foursome,
Olson and LeClair were up against
Detroit's two top linismen, veter-
ans Sam Kocsis and Tony Novit-
sky. The former shot a 74 while
Novitsky tied Olson for medal hon-
ors with 73.
These two Titans came up
with two of the best.shots of the
day on the back nine holes.
Novitsky birdied the 415-yard,
par 4 13th when his 25-foot ap-
proach from the edge of the
green dropped into the cup.
Kocsis, "old man" of the meet at
31, birdied the short 17th as" he
dropped a 30-foot putt for a deuce.
* * *
THE WOLVERINES will get
back into the golfing wars Satur-
day at Columbus when they en-
gage Purdue, last year's Big Ten
champion, Indiana, and Ohio
State in a quadrangular meet.
This meet, pitting probably the
top golf teams in the Big Ten
should go a long way in determin-
ing favorites in the Western Con-
ference Meet next month.

NEW SWIMMING CO-CAPTAINS-John Davies of Australia,
(left) and Stew Elliott, who are both breast strokers, have been
chosen to lead the Wolverine tank squad next season.
* * * *
Elliott, Davies Selected
For Swim Co-Captaincy-

By GEORGE FLINT

O--

The Michigan swimming squad
named a pair of point-producing
breaststrokers, John Davies, '52,
and Stew Elliott, '52, to captain the
Mann-led natators next season.
The tankmen made their selec-
tion at the annual swimming ban-
quet in the Michigan Union.
* . *
DAVIES, A LITHE splasher from
Sidney, Australia, was the Big Ten
and National AAU champion in the

Lack of Outdoor Work Hinders Thinclads

k_ r

By BYRLE ABBIN
That nasty old weatherman,
whose antics have always bothered
Michigan's spring sports, has re-
ally spread his grief this year and
in so doing has brought repercus-
sions from such distant places as
Illinois and California with it.
All news coming out of the two
midwestern cinder squads, Illinois
and Michigan, has been anything
but rosy as the champ and run-
ner-up in the Big Ten Indoor
meet prepare to challenge the
cream of the West and the US
track world, Southern California,
in the top outdoor meet of the
season at Los Angeles' coliseum
this Saturday.

AND THERE has been good
reason, too, for Illini Coach Leo
Johnson and Wolverine mentor
Don Canham to be pessimistic
about their squad's chances and
in the same breath pass all the
superlatives westward to USC's
famous molder of top college cin-
der aggregates, Jesse Hill.
The midwestern c o a c h e s
have had nothing but inclement
weather to face in their spring
training, which is so important
to good outdoor track perform,
ances, while.Hill has had noth-
ing but warm California sun-
shine to get his team into shape
for the all-important meet.

PIGSKIN BLUES:
Knutson Injured in Practice;
Out for Rest of Spring Drills

Johnson has been saying over
and over how he hates to think of
what is going to happen to his
cindermen out in California and
Canham reiterates this to the full-
est extent and-adds more yet to
it.
* * *
BESIDES HAVING the oppor-
tunity to practice outside every
day since last fall, the USC Tro-
jans have had the very important
fortune of having three outdoor
meets under their belt already.
In each of these meets the
National Champs looked power-
ful, with the major wins being a
77-54 thumping of a very good
Arizona State of Tempe team,
and a resounding 102-28 rout of
the University of California.
Michigan and Illinois, in the
meantime, were entering small
contingents in scattered indoor
meets, and attempting the tran-
sition to outdoor work at the
same time. Although doing well
in the indoor meets, both squads
could look for no solace in this,
as their outdoor preparations
were going to nought as the result
of incessant rain, snow, and un-
seasonably cold weather,
MAINLY HURT by this bad
weather are the hurdlers and
dashmen, who have had little
chance to train and get used to
the much longer outdoor dis-
tances. The rest of the squad was
restrained too, in that no full ef-
fort could be given in practice
and trials for fear of the pulled
muscles and other injuries that
occur easily in cold weather.
The Wolverine cindermen prac-
ticed all spring vacation, trying
to make use of what good days did
show up, and wound up their Ann
Arbor drills yesterday afternoon,
This morning they will leave Wil-
low Run at 8 a.m. on a chartered
United Air Line plane.

200 and 220-yard breaststroke
races, respectively.
He also placed second to for-
mer Wolverine star Charley Moss
in the 100-yard event at the
AAU meet in Columbus.
His top time in the 200 this sea-
son was 2:18.4, clocked at the Big
Ten championships. He had a
2:34.7 for the 220-yard race. Dav-
ies was a member of the Austral-
ian team at the 1948 Olympic
games and placed fourth in the
200-meter breast stroke.
ELLIOTT, ONE OF the most im-
proved members of this season's
squad, won the 100-yard title in
the Big Ten meet and swam on
the medley relay team in most of
the 1951 dual meets.
King-sized for a swimmer, the
Dousman, Wisconsin athlete pla-
ced third in the 100 at the NCAA
championships at Austin. His
top time in that event in the big
meets was the 60.4 mark he
achieved in the conference
championships.
Davies and Elliott suceed sprint-
er Dave Neisch, '51, the captain
during the past season.
MICHIGAN HAD co-captains in
the sport in 1948, when Bob Sohl
and Dick Weinberg led the Maize
and Blue to the Big Ten and NCAA
championships.
Davies and Elliott only hope that
is a good omen for their tenure
at the top of the Wolverine tank

By JIM PARKER
Old man Weather, the culprit
that caused Michigan's home base-
ball season to be moved up to a
Big Ten opening with Illinois here
tomorrow afternoon, could turn
out to be a major factor in deter-
mining the Western Conference
champ this year.
The same weatherman that
caused the cancellation of the
scheduled opener with Wayne
Tuesday, may interfere with the
diamond proceedings this week-
end-and with a result that could
either help bring another Confer-
ence crown to Michigan or just as
easily put a possible title out of the
range of the Wolverines.
IT ALL STEMS from a Big Ten
ruling that prevents the re-sched-
uling of games that are rained
out on their scheduled dates.
Thus, if the weather were to
interfere agai pnthis weekend to
cause the cancellation of the
Illinois series, Michigan could
possibly be benefitted by having
its Big Ten schedule moved up
to next weekend and two games
with Iowa.
This would give the Wolverines
a much-needed chance next week
to sharpen their claws on two
strong non-conference foes, West-
ern Michigan and Detroit, both of
which are much higher caliber
opponents than the six Michigan
faced on its southern training
trip,
**
ON THE OTHER hand, the can-
cellation of the Illinois series
could prove a hindrance if the
LATE SPORTS:
Knicks Even
NBA Playoffs
NEW YORK-(A) - The New
York Knicks evened the final NBA
playoff series at three gaines
apiece last night by beating the
Rochester Royals, 80 to 73, for
the third straight time. The de-
ciding game in the best-of-seven
series will be played at Rochester
Saturday night.
SENATORS 6, ATHLETICS 4
PHILADELPHIA - (P) - The
Washington Senators staged a
three run ninth inning rally for
a 6-4tvictory over Philadelphia's
Athletics last night.

SOFTBALL
Sigma Chi 9, Kappa Nu 0
Theta Chi defeated Alpha Phi Alpha
(forfeit)
Beta Theta Phi 5, Kappa Sigma 3
Sigma Phi Epsilon 3, Delta Upsilon 0
Phi Kappa Psi 6, Delta Chi 0,
Sigma Phi 6, Triangle 1
Phi Sigma Delta 10, Acacia 0
Theta Chi defeated Omega Psi Phi
(forfeit)
Phi Gamma Delta 21, Psi Upsilon 0
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 8, Chi Phi 7
Pi Lambda Phi 4, Phi Kappa Psi 1
(correction)
WATER POLO
Phi Delta Theta 2, Alpha Tau Omega 0

Conference flag winner were to
be decided on the basis of games
played,
This happened to Iowa last
year. The Hawkeyes finished
their Big Ten schedule with an
8-3 record, lacking just one vic-
tory of sharing the crown with
Michigan and Wisconsin, both
with 9-3 records,
And Iowa's "other game," a'can-
cellation with Purdue, was one
that the Hawkeyes should have
won, considering that the Boiler-
makers finished just one notch
above the Conference cellar,
* * *
SO EVEN IF tomorrow's game
were to be rained out, forcing a
double header on Saturday, and
foul weather should claim one or
both of these, Michigan could end
up in the same boat as Iowa last
year-just out of the running.
There is one condition under
which a Conference game may
be rescheduled, but this is rare-
ly resorted to.
If the home team coach arrang-
es for a rescheduling of the series
before the visiting team arrives
at the game site, Big Ten rules
permit the change-but only if
drastic weather conditions force
this move and then only if both
teams can arrange an open date
for rescheduling.

THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN
". e erve to Serve adEt
309 SOUTH MAINy STREET

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In Michigan's c a s e neither
seems likely. And Coach Ray
Fisher himself is not too concerned
with this angle-he's too busy
readying the squad for Illinois,
good weather or bad.
Pitching again received Fisher's
special attention yesterday as he
sent Duane Hegedorn, Dick Yirk-
owski, Bill DenHouter, John Schu-
ett and Earl Keim to the mound
to face their teammates in the
team's second straight outdoor in-
tra-squad game.

crew.

l
1
r
7
1
t
t
Y
n I

One of the coaches' worst ene- terbaan and his cohorts are put-
mies, the injury jinx, struck the ting the lads mostly through fun-
Wolverine spring football camp damentals. The Michigan mentor
this week, plans no changes in position of any
The victim is Gene Knutson, who of his players as yet.
suffered a broken right leg. The* *
Beloit, Wisconsin gridder was ONE OF THE many rebuilding
deemed the outstanding frosh end jobs facing Oosterbaan is the find-
prospect by Coach Bennie Ooster- ing of a place kicker to replace
baan. He will miss the remaining Harry Allis, who held forth on the
five weeks of practice. place kicking department for the
* * * past three years.
KNUTSON DIDN'T realize he When asked who would replace
bad broken a limb in practice al- the Flint extra point specialist,
though the leg pained him. In fact Oosterbaan mentioned three fel-
he didn't know it until he stepped lows, Don Peterson, Dick Stro-
off a curb and the leg gave out, zewski and Bill Billings. Peter-
Enutson is now confined to the son will be a senior in September
health service with a cast on the and the latter two will be jun-
limb. iors.
On the happier side of the Both Peterson and Strozewski
picture is the fact that the grid- are aiming at the uprights daily
ders are progressing with scrim- while Billings performs on the
mages being the order of the baseball squad. Billings displayed
day since the first week of prac- excellent punting form in his brief
tice. appearances on the gridiron last
For the time being, at least, Oos- season.

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